SOLD Items
Badges
Norfolk Light Artillery Blues Gold Pin

SOLD!!!

Offered is a beautiful gold and enamel pin worn by members of the Norfolk Light (Virginia) Artillery Blues.  This beautiful pin has a pair of crossed cannon tubes in the middle of the pin.  The cannon tubes have a red enameled background.  Surrounding the tubes are “111” and “B”.  Around the red enamel is a circle of blue enamel with “Norfolk Light Artillery Blues – 1828” written on it.  On the back of the pin is engraved “1925”.  Also stamped in the back is “10K – B.B. Co.”.  The pin is approximately 9/16 inches wide.  


The battery was originally formed in 1828. It was placed on active duty in April, 1861, as Company H, 16th Virginia Infantry Regiment. It is represented by a marker at Gettysburg.

1862
March 25Organized by the conversion of Company H, 16th Infantry, to artillery service, under the command of Captain Charles R. Grandy. Assigned to Department of Norfolk.
MayBattery armamed with two 12-lb. Napoleons, two 12-lb. Howitzers, and two 3-inch Rifles
JulyAttached to Artillery, Department of North Carolina
DecemberAttached to Artillery Battalion, Anderson’s Division, 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
December 13
Battle of Fredericksburg
1863
MayAttached to Artillery Battalion, Heth’s Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
May 1-4
Battle of Chancellorsville
July 1-4
Battle of Gettysburg

Captain Grandy took 106 men into the fight with two 3 Inch Ordnance Rifles and two 12 pounder howitzers.

From the War Department marker on the field at Gettysburg:

July 1 Arrived on the field in the afternoon but was not engaged.

July 2 The Rifles took position here in the morning and participated during the afternoon and evening in the artillery duel with the Union batteries on Cemetery Hill.

July 3 Ordered to the south side of McMillan’s Woods and held all day in reserve without firing a shot though sometimes under fire.

July 4 The Howitzers were never actively engaged in the battle but on this day were placed in a position here. At night they rejoined the Rifles and with them began the march to Hagerstown. Losses not reported in detail.

JulyTransferred to Garnett’s-Richardson’s Battalion, Artillery, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
July 14Falling Waters
November-DecemberMine Run Campaign
1864
May 5-6
Battle of The Wilderness
May 8-21
Battle of Spotsylvania Court House
May 23-26North Anna
June 1-3
Cold Harbor
JunePetersburg Siege begins
1865
March-AprilAppomattox Campaign
April 8Captured as part of Walker’s column with 1 Warrant Officer and 13 men
Captain Jacob Vickery took command after Captain Grandy

Pickett-Buchanan Confederate Veteran Camp, Norfolk, Virginia Ribbon

SOLD!!!
Offered is a great ribbon worn by Confederate veterans of the Pickett-Buchanan Camp of Confederate veterans of Norfolk, Virginia.   The ribbon is a beige color.  On the top half of the ribbon the Confederate battle flag and the Virginia state flag are crossed.  On the bottom half of the ribbon is written in blue ink "Pickett-Buchanan Camp, C.V. - Norfolk, VA.".  The ribbon is made by the "Paxton Pollard Engraver & Printer, Norfolk, VA." as written on the back of the ribbon.  The ribbon is approximately 7 1/8 inches tall by 2 3/8 inches wide.  There are a couple of water marks on the ribbon.  You can see these mostly on the back of the ribbon and they do not impact the beauty of this wonderful ribbon.

Richmond Howitzers at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument Unveiling Ribbon

SOLD!!!
A fantastic ribbon worn by members of the famed Richmond Howitzers and the 1894 monument unveiling of the Richmond, Virginia Soldiers and Sailors Monument.  The ribbon is a beige color with a likeness of the Richmond Howitzer's badge in the middle of the ribbon in red ink.  Written in black ink on the ribbon is "Unveiling Soldiers and Sailors Monument.  Howitzer Association. - Richmond, VA. - May 30th, 1894.".  Written on the likeness of the badge is "Richmond Howitzers - Cita Mors Aut Victoria Laeta - 1859".  The ribbon is approximately 6 1/2 inches long and 2 3/8 inches wide.  It is in great condition.  

4th Michigan Cavalry Reunion at Detroit in 1899 Badge

SOLD!!!

Offered is a great badge worn by veterans of the 4th Michigan Cavalry Association at their reunion held in Detroit, Michigan in 1899.  The hanger is a celluloid button wrapped in a light blue cloth with a pair of cavalry sabers in a silver color.  Attached to the hanger is a yellow ribbon.  Written in silver colored ink on the ribbon is "4th Michigan Cavalry Association - Detroit, Mich. - 1899".  The ribbon was made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted by the manufacturer's label attached to the back of the ribbon.


 
4th Michigan Cavalry
The Fourth Cavalry was authorized about the 1st. of July, 1862, with Colonel R. Minty, of Detroit, Lt.Colonel of the Third Cavalry as commander, being ordered into rendezvous at Detroit, on the 29th. of July. It was mustered into the service of the United States on the 29th. of August, with the maximum force, being composed of companies recruited in various parts of the State. When they left Michigan on the 26th. of September, it had on its rolls the names of 1233 officers and men. They were fully armed and equipped, their destination being, Louisville,KY.

The Fourth, under the command of Colonel Minty, marched from Louisville on October the 10th., being in the advance on Stanford,KY, where the confederate Morgan was stationed with 2500 men, two pieces of artillery. Attacking and driving Morgan as far as Crab Orchard, killing a Lieutenant Colonel, taking a Major and 11 men prisoners, the Regiment marched back to Mumfordsville. On November 1st., it marched, 543 strong, from this point, with the cavalry division, via Bowling Green, South Union, Springfield and Mitchellville, to Galatin,TN, there reporting to Major General Crittenden, on November 8th. Crossing the Cumberland River, it met and drove back Morgan's pickets, next morning marched to Lebanon, again driving in his pickets, then at a gallop entered that town, two miles in advance of the Infantry, attacking and driving Morgan, with his force of 750 men, his two pieces of artillery, capturing a large number of mules, commissary stores and clothing, rejoining Crittenden at Silver Springs, where they engaged in scouting the surrounding countryside.

On the 19th, they escorted the 14th. Brigade from Rural Hill to Stewart's Ferry, where they continued on scouting duty, when on the 9th., they reported to General Stanley, Chief of Cavalry, then marched to Camp Rosecrans, near Nashville, where they were again engaged in scouting, having lost 3 men wounded, during October and November. At 7 O'Clock on the morning of December the 4th., Colonel Minty, with 302 officers and men, moved from Nashville on a reconnaissance in the direction of Franklin. When about eight miles from Nashville, they encountered the confederate pickets, driving them back on both Wilson Creek and Franklin Pikes, to their reserve, posted at Hollow Tree Gap, naturally an exceedingly strong position. Dislodging the confederates at this point, they advanced to within one mile of Franklin, where a large confederate force was stationed., thence they returned to camp at Nashville, not having sustained any loss. On the 17th., the Regiment, as part of a larger cavalry force, under the command of General D.S. Stanley, moved towards Triune, engaging the confederates about eight miles out, on the Wilson Creek Pike, driving them back to within three miles of Triune. Learning that the southerners were in force at that point, under Buckner and Hardee, General Stanley withdrew three miles and halted on a crossroad to Franklin, the horses remain saddled all of the night. Before daybreak, they moved on, arriving at Franklin about 7 A.M. Finding the confederates 1300 strong, well posted, under cover of houses along the bank of the river, Colonel Minty advanced with the Regiment at a gallop to a shallow ford, the bridge having been destroyed, where, with his revolving rifles, he succeeded in forcing a crossing, capturing the rebel pickets and dislodging the force behind them. He pursued them three miles, keeping well in advance of the mounted force, killing one Captain and four men, wounding six, and capturing a stand of colors along with seventeen prisoners, two of whom were officers. Then returning to Franklin, they destroyed a large supply of flour and other stores. Notwithstanding the Regiment was much exposed to hostile fire, they suffered no casualties. They then returned to camp at Nashville.

On the 15th., Captain Abeel, with a picket of 40 men, stationed on the Murfreesboro Pike, was approached by a flag of truce, then while negotiating with a rebel officer, who accompanied it, was surprised and captured with his entire command.

On the 20th., they fought at Laurel Hill. On the 21st., Captain Mix, with 50 men moved out of camp, with orders to scout in the direction of Franklin, on both sides of Wilson Creek Pike, to obtain all information possible. About 2 miles out, he met Colonel Stanley, in charge of a forage train, with two regiments of infantry, a section of artillery, and a detachment of 30 men of the 4th. Kentucky cavalry. The Colonel informed Captain Mix that the Kentuckians were skirmishing with the confederates, and directed him to join them, assume command, then act as his judgement might dictate. Dismounting his men, but failing to dislodge the rebels, strongly posted behind a stone wall, the Captain remounted his force, then charged, causing a precipitate retreat of the defenders, only after they fired two volleys, wounding Sergeant McIntire of Company "B", while the confederates lost 7 killed, with 10 captured.

There was a general advance of the Army of the Cumberland from Nashville, on the 26th, towards Lavernge. The Regiment, in command on Lieutenant Colonel Dickinson, as a part of Minty's Brigade, met the confederates about 10 miles out, on the Murfreesboro Pike. After sharp skirmishing, the rebels fell back, being steadily reinforced until reaching Lavernge, where they made a stand with 2500 cavalry and mounted infantry, with four pieces of artillery, under the command of General Wheeler. Here the fighting continued until dark, when the Regiment bivouacked, having lost one wounded. On the morning of the 27th., the rebels having fallen back, Minty's Brigade moved forward, with the exception of one battalion of the 4th., under the command of Captain Mix, who was sent to the left in advance of the brigade, to report to General Hazen, on the Jefferson Pike. General Hazen directed Captain Mix to gain possession of a bridge, about two miles in front of him, to prevent its destruction. He pushed forward, when he was immediately confronted by a force of rebel cavalry. He charged, then in less than fifteen minutes, had possession of the bridge, having driven an entire rebel regiment of cavalry before them. He was in turn attacked by the whole force of the brigade, but held his position, for an hour and a half, when General Hazen came up with his infantry, when the confederates fell back. Captain Mix had two men wounded with three taken as prisoners.

On the afternoon of the 31st., the Regiment having moved rapidly across the country from Lavernge, whither it had been sent the night before to operate against General Wheeler, rejoined the brigade, which took up a position on the right flank of General McCook, at Stone River, and nearly parallel to, and about three-fourths of a mile from, the Nashville and Murfreesboro Pike.

Here the Regiment,formed a line of dismounted skirmishers, close to the edge of a wood, out of which had been driven a large force of confederate cavalry. Colonel Minty, with his brigade, was here driven back by an overwhelming force of dismounted cavalry, with four pieces of artillery, just at sundown. The rebels remounted, then advancing from the woods, formed four lines. After falling back to the cover of a small knoll, the Colonel reformed the brigade, then ordered a charge, General Stanley leading two companies of the 4th., along with 50 men of the 15th. Pennsylvania, routing the confederates, while capturing four stands of colors. At the same time, Colonel Minty charged the first line in his front, and with the balance of the 4th., along with the 1st. Tennessee, driving it back, then again reforming, dashed at the second line of rebels, which in turn broke and ran, retreating from the field. During the engagement the Regiment lost 5 wounded, 3 prisoners with 2 missing, while in the whole operations surrounding the Battle of Stone River, lost 12 horses killed, 3 wounded and 8 captured. While the loss to the confederates appears to have been very great in prisoners, as Minty's Brigade alone captured 192.

The Regiment, with its brigade, moved out from Murfreesboro on the evening of the 9th., returning to Nashville, scouting the area in between the two cities, to return on the 19th. Early in February the Regiment set out on a scouting mission to gain information and hinder the confederates operating under General's Wheeler and Forrest. During this scout the Regiment marched over 250 miles in much privation, due to the rainey cold weather, but returned with 145 prisoners, including 2 Colonels and 14 other commissioned officers.

The Regiment remained in the Tennessee area, continually scouting and skirmishing with the rebels, until April of 1864, when 800 strong and well equipped, now armed with the Spencer repeating carbine, they left Nashville, under the command of Colonel Park, marching to Columbia, where they became part of the 2nd. Cavalry Division. They then moved through Shelbyville, Tullahoma and Dechard, over the Cumberland Mountains to Stevenson, then Bridgeport, crossed the Tennessee River, to Shell Mound, crossed Raccoon Ridge, Lookout Valley, Lookout Mountain, Pigeon Mountain to Lafayette, then across Taylor's Ridge to Vilanon,GA. They then participated in all of the movements of the army, in the March to Atlanta, where scouting and skirmishing became almost a daily occurrence, in addition to the patrols needed to locate the defensive positions of the retreating confederates. When the Regiment reached Atlanta, in August, its men and mounts had been worked to the limits of endurance.

During the past 12 months, the Regiment had marched over 2600 miles, when they were ordered back to Nashville for re-mounting and re-equipping. On the 12th. of January, 1865, they again moved out, to conduct operations in the Alabama and Georgia areas.

On the 7th. of May 1865, the Regiment was ordered to proceed, as quickly as possible, to Spaulding,GA, in Irwin County, and picket the Omulgee River, from Hawkinsville to the mouth of the Oconee River, for the purpose of preventing the escape of Jefferson Davis, who was then supposed to be making his way to the coast, and if the Regiment got on his track to follow him wherever he went, then to capture, or kill him without fail. At Abbyville, Colonel Minty became satisfied that Davis had already crossed the Ocmulgee River, then ascertained that the 1st. Wisconsin Cavalry were following him closely in the direction of Irwinsville. With 153 of his best mounted men of the Regiment, he followed the line of the Ocmulgee for some miles, then took a bridle path, or blind road through the woods towards Irwinsville, arriving there about 2 A.M. on the 10th., to find that Davis's party had not yet passed.

Pretending to be a part of his escort, Colonel Pritchard gained information from a citizen that Davis was encamped in the woods about three fourths of a mile north of the town.

The camp in which Davis and his family were found was pleasantly situated, surrounded by a thick pine forest, close to a small swamp, not far from a running brook, affording healthful refreshment for the weary fugitives who rested near its banks. In the camp were standing three wall tents, in line, parallel with the road, facing the opposite direction, while the narrow space between the tents, was occupied by several horses, without equipment. Still beyond, in advance of this line of tents, was a small tent, pitched against a large tree. In this closure of tents, reposing all unconscious of the impending danger, lay Davis and his family, together with his military staff. Nearby was the rest of the camp, which appeared to be troops, with army wagons, ambulances, horses and cavalry equipment. The Regiment charged into the camp just at early dawn, completely surprising them, then making the arrest. A few Michigan men then guarded the tents, while the main force was called to the sound of firing, unfortunately caused by a collision of a portion of the 4th., with the 1st. Wisconsin Cavalry, closing in on the camp simultaneously with the 4th.

The camp was soon broken up, when after breakfast and a brief rest, the male prisoners were mounted on their own horses, Mrs. Davis, her servants and the rest of the family were placed in the ambulances for the trip to Macon. On arriving at Macon, Colonel Pritchard, Captain Hudson and Lieutenant's Stauber and Purinton, with 22 men were detailed to escort Davis to Washington D.C.

There having been a reward, of 100,000 dollars, posted for the capture of Davis, the men of the 4th. were naturally elated at their good fortune, however, the War Department appointed a commission that decided that the men of the 4th. were indeed entitled to the money, but when Congress approved the appropriation, a claim was immediately put forth by the men of the 1st. Wisconsin. It was not until July of 1868 that a bill authorizing the payment was passed, and at that time Congress felt the reward be shared by both the 4th. Michigan and the 1st. Wisconsin.

When the money was distributed, it was shared equally by all men who had participated in the expedition.

The Fourth gained a national reputation, with world wide notoriety, by the capture of Davis. It was an accomplishment of an eminently special and important duty, for the nation, so distinctive and definite in its character, as to render a like service impossible, giving it a place in the history of the war, without parallel.

The Regiment, while feeling its duty was more than aptly performed, and that the war was indeed finally complete, returned to Nashville, on the 1st. of July, where they were mustered out of service and paid off. Returning to Michigan, they arrived at Detroit, where they were disbanded on the 10th.

During their term of Federal service, they were engaged at:

Stamford, KyGallatin, TnLebanon, Tn
Rural Hill, TnBaird's Mill, TnHollow Tree Gap, Tn
Wilson's Creek Road, TnPurdy, TnFranklin, Tn
Wilson Creek, TnLavernge, TnJefferson's Bridge, Tn
Nashville Pike, TnStone River, TnManchester Pike, Tn
Harpeth River, TnBradyville, TnWoodbury, Tn
Rover, TnCharlotte, TnAuburn, Tn
Liberty, TnUnionville, TnThompson's Station, Tn
Rutherford Creek, TnDuck River, TnProsperity Church, Tn
Snow Hill, TnMcMinnville, TnStatesville, Tn
Alexandria, Tn Wartrace, Tn Middletown, Tn
Versailles, Tn Cherry Valley, Tn Shelbyville, Tn
Hickory Creek, Tn Tullahoma, Tn Rock Island, Tn
Sparta, Tn Sperry Mill, Tn Smith's Cross Roads, Tn
Reed's Bridge, Tn Chickamauga, Ga Rossville, Ga
Cotton Port, Tn Hill Creek, Tn Chattanooga, Tn
Cleveland, Tn Mission Ridge, Tn Tunnel Hill, Ga
Mission Bridge, Ga Arundel Creek, Ga Kingston, Ga
Dallas, Ga Villa Rica, Ga Lost Mountain, Ga
Big Shanty, Ga McAfee's Cross Roads, Ga Noonday Creek, Ga
Kenesaw Mountain, Ga Rosswell, Ga Lebanon Mills, Ga
Stone Mountain, Ga Covington, Ga Flat Rock Creek, Ga
Atlanta, Ga Fair Oaks, Ga Jonesboro, Ga
Lovejoys Station, Ga McDonough's, Ga Rosswell, Ga
Sweet Water, Ga Moses Creek, Ga New Hope Church, Ga
Stilesboro, Ga Rome, Ga Blue Pond, Ga
Selma, Al Double Bridge, Ga Macon, Ga

ORGANIZATION

Organized at Detroit, Mich., and mustered in August 28, 1862.
Left State for Louisville, Ky., September 26.
Attached to 1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Ohio to November, 1862.
1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to January, 1863.
1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to October, 1863.
2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to November, 1863.
1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to November, 1864.
1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi to November, 1864.
2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi to July, 1865.
Mustered out July 1, 1865.

1861-1865

Total Enrollment2217
Killed in Action32
Died of Wounds15
Died of Disease328
Total Casualty Rate16.9%

4 Michigan Cavalry Regimental Badge

SOLD!!!

Offered is a nice badge worn by members of the 4th Michigan Cavalry Association at their various reunions and parades.  The hanger celluloid button covered by blue cloth.  A pair of silver colored sabers are on the blue cloth.  A yellow ribbon is attached to the hanger.  Written in silver colored ink on the ribbon is "4th Michigan Cavalry Association".  The badge was made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted by the manufacturer's label in the back of the ribbon.


4th Michigan Cavalry

The Fourth Cavalry was authorized about the 1st. of July, 1862, with Colonel R. Minty, of Detroit, Lt.Colonel of the Third Cavalry as commander, being ordered into rendezvous at Detroit, on the 29th. of July. It was mustered into the service of the United States on the 29th. of August, with the maximum force, being composed of companies recruited in various parts of the State. When they left Michigan on the 26th. of September, it had on its rolls the names of 1233 officers and men. They were fully armed and equipped, their destination being, Louisville,KY.

The Fourth, under the command of Colonel Minty, marched from Louisville on October the 10th., being in the advance on Stanford,KY, where the confederate Morgan was stationed with 2500 men, two pieces of artillery. Attacking and driving Morgan as far as Crab Orchard, killing a Lieutenant Colonel, taking a Major and 11 men prisoners, the Regiment marched back to Mumfordsville. On November 1st., it marched, 543 strong, from this point, with the cavalry division, via Bowling Green, South Union, Springfield and Mitchellville, to Galatin,TN, there reporting to Major General Crittenden, on November 8th. Crossing the Cumberland River, it met and drove back Morgan's pickets, next morning marched to Lebanon, again driving in his pickets, then at a gallop entered that town, two miles in advance of the Infantry, attacking and driving Morgan, with his force of 750 men, his two pieces of artillery, capturing a large number of mules, commissary stores and clothing, rejoining Crittenden at Silver Springs, where they engaged in scouting the surrounding countryside.

On the 19th, they escorted the 14th. Brigade from Rural Hill to Stewart's Ferry, where they continued on scouting duty, when on the 9th., they reported to General Stanley, Chief of Cavalry, then marched to Camp Rosecrans, near Nashville, where they were again engaged in scouting, having lost 3 men wounded, during October and November. At 7 O'Clock on the morning of December the 4th., Colonel Minty, with 302 officers and men, moved from Nashville on a reconnaissance in the direction of Franklin. When about eight miles from Nashville, they encountered the confederate pickets, driving them back on both Wilson Creek and Franklin Pikes, to their reserve, posted at Hollow Tree Gap, naturally an exceedingly strong position. Dislodging the confederates at this point, they advanced to within one mile of Franklin, where a large confederate force was stationed., thence they returned to camp at Nashville, not having sustained any loss. On the 17th., the Regiment, as part of a larger cavalry force, under the command of General D.S. Stanley, moved towards Triune, engaging the confederates about eight miles out, on the Wilson Creek Pike, driving them back to within three miles of Triune. Learning that the southerners were in force at that point, under Buckner and Hardee, General Stanley withdrew three miles and halted on a crossroad to Franklin, the horses remain saddled all of the night. Before daybreak, they moved on, arriving at Franklin about 7 A.M. Finding the confederates 1300 strong, well posted, under cover of houses along the bank of the river, Colonel Minty advanced with the Regiment at a gallop to a shallow ford, the bridge having been destroyed, where, with his revolving rifles, he succeeded in forcing a crossing, capturing the rebel pickets and dislodging the force behind them. He pursued them three miles, keeping well in advance of the mounted force, killing one Captain and four men, wounding six, and capturing a stand of colors along with seventeen prisoners, two of whom were officers. Then returning to Franklin, they destroyed a large supply of flour and other stores. Notwithstanding the Regiment was much exposed to hostile fire, they suffered no casualties. They then returned to camp at Nashville.

On the 15th., Captain Abeel, with a picket of 40 men, stationed on the Murfreesboro Pike, was approached by a flag of truce, then while negotiating with a rebel officer, who accompanied it, was surprised and captured with his entire command.

On the 20th., they fought at Laurel Hill. On the 21st., Captain Mix, with 50 men moved out of camp, with orders to scout in the direction of Franklin, on both sides of Wilson Creek Pike, to obtain all information possible. About 2 miles out, he met Colonel Stanley, in charge of a forage train, with two regiments of infantry, a section of artillery, and a detachment of 30 men of the 4th. Kentucky cavalry. The Colonel informed Captain Mix that the Kentuckians were skirmishing with the confederates, and directed him to join them, assume command, then act as his judgement might dictate. Dismounting his men, but failing to dislodge the rebels, strongly posted behind a stone wall, the Captain remounted his force, then charged, causing a precipitate retreat of the defenders, only after they fired two volleys, wounding Sergeant McIntire of Company "B", while the confederates lost 7 killed, with 10 captured.

There was a general advance of the Army of the Cumberland from Nashville, on the 26th, towards Lavernge. The Regiment, in command on Lieutenant Colonel Dickinson, as a part of Minty's Brigade, met the confederates about 10 miles out, on the Murfreesboro Pike. After sharp skirmishing, the rebels fell back, being steadily reinforced until reaching Lavernge, where they made a stand with 2500 cavalry and mounted infantry, with four pieces of artillery, under the command of General Wheeler. Here the fighting continued until dark, when the Regiment bivouacked, having lost one wounded. On the morning of the 27th., the rebels having fallen back, Minty's Brigade moved forward, with the exception of one battalion of the 4th., under the command of Captain Mix, who was sent to the left in advance of the brigade, to report to General Hazen, on the Jefferson Pike. General Hazen directed Captain Mix to gain possession of a bridge, about two miles in front of him, to prevent its destruction. He pushed forward, when he was immediately confronted by a force of rebel cavalry. He charged, then in less than fifteen minutes, had possession of the bridge, having driven an entire rebel regiment of cavalry before them. He was in turn attacked by the whole force of the brigade, but held his position, for an hour and a half, when General Hazen came up with his infantry, when the confederates fell back. Captain Mix had two men wounded with three taken as prisoners.

On the afternoon of the 31st., the Regiment having moved rapidly across the country from Lavernge, whither it had been sent the night before to operate against General Wheeler, rejoined the brigade, which took up a position on the right flank of General McCook, at Stone River, and nearly parallel to, and about three-fourths of a mile from, the Nashville and Murfreesboro Pike.

Here the Regiment,formed a line of dismounted skirmishers, close to the edge of a wood, out of which had been driven a large force of confederate cavalry. Colonel Minty, with his brigade, was here driven back by an overwhelming force of dismounted cavalry, with four pieces of artillery, just at sundown. The rebels remounted, then advancing from the woods, formed four lines. After falling back to the cover of a small knoll, the Colonel reformed the brigade, then ordered a charge, General Stanley leading two companies of the 4th., along with 50 men of the 15th. Pennsylvania, routing the confederates, while capturing four stands of colors. At the same time, Colonel Minty charged the first line in his front, and with the balance of the 4th., along with the 1st. Tennessee, driving it back, then again reforming, dashed at the second line of rebels, which in turn broke and ran, retreating from the field. During the engagement the Regiment lost 5 wounded, 3 prisoners with 2 missing, while in the whole operations surrounding the Battle of Stone River, lost 12 horses killed, 3 wounded and 8 captured. While the loss to the confederates appears to have been very great in prisoners, as Minty's Brigade alone captured 192.

The Regiment, with its brigade, moved out from Murfreesboro on the evening of the 9th., returning to Nashville, scouting the area in between the two cities, to return on the 19th. Early in February the Regiment set out on a scouting mission to gain information and hinder the confederates operating under General's Wheeler and Forrest. During this scout the Regiment marched over 250 miles in much privation, due to the rainey cold weather, but returned with 145 prisoners, including 2 Colonels and 14 other commissioned officers.

The Regiment remained in the Tennessee area, continually scouting and skirmishing with the rebels, until April of 1864, when 800 strong and well equipped, now armed with the Spencer repeating carbine, they left Nashville, under the command of Colonel Park, marching to Columbia, where they became part of the 2nd. Cavalry Division. They then moved through Shelbyville, Tullahoma and Dechard, over the Cumberland Mountains to Stevenson, then Bridgeport, crossed the Tennessee River, to Shell Mound, crossed Raccoon Ridge, Lookout Valley, Lookout Mountain, Pigeon Mountain to Lafayette, then across Taylor's Ridge to Vilanon,GA. They then participated in all of the movements of the army, in the March to Atlanta, where scouting and skirmishing became almost a daily occurrence, in addition to the patrols needed to locate the defensive positions of the retreating confederates. When the Regiment reached Atlanta, in August, its men and mounts had been worked to the limits of endurance.

During the past 12 months, the Regiment had marched over 2600 miles, when they were ordered back to Nashville for re-mounting and re-equipping. On the 12th. of January, 1865, they again moved out, to conduct operations in the Alabama and Georgia areas.

On the 7th. of May 1865, the Regiment was ordered to proceed, as quickly as possible, to Spaulding,GA, in Irwin County, and picket the Omulgee River, from Hawkinsville to the mouth of the Oconee River, for the purpose of preventing the escape of Jefferson Davis, who was then supposed to be making his way to the coast, and if the Regiment got on his track to follow him wherever he went, then to capture, or kill him without fail. At Abbyville, Colonel Minty became satisfied that Davis had already crossed the Ocmulgee River, then ascertained that the 1st. Wisconsin Cavalry were following him closely in the direction of Irwinsville. With 153 of his best mounted men of the Regiment, he followed the line of the Ocmulgee for some miles, then took a bridle path, or blind road through the woods towards Irwinsville, arriving there about 2 A.M. on the 10th., to find that Davis's party had not yet passed.

Pretending to be a part of his escort, Colonel Pritchard gained information from a citizen that Davis was encamped in the woods about three fourths of a mile north of the town.

The camp in which Davis and his family were found was pleasantly situated, surrounded by a thick pine forest, close to a small swamp, not far from a running brook, affording healthful refreshment for the weary fugitives who rested near its banks. In the camp were standing three wall tents, in line, parallel with the road, facing the opposite direction, while the narrow space between the tents, was occupied by several horses, without equipment. Still beyond, in advance of this line of tents, was a small tent, pitched against a large tree. In this closure of tents, reposing all unconscious of the impending danger, lay Davis and his family, together with his military staff. Nearby was the rest of the camp, which appeared to be troops, with army wagons, ambulances, horses and cavalry equipment. The Regiment charged into the camp just at early dawn, completely surprising them, then making the arrest. A few Michigan men then guarded the tents, while the main force was called to the sound of firing, unfortunately caused by a collision of a portion of the 4th., with the 1st. Wisconsin Cavalry, closing in on the camp simultaneously with the 4th.

The camp was soon broken up, when after breakfast and a brief rest, the male prisoners were mounted on their own horses, Mrs. Davis, her servants and the rest of the family were placed in the ambulances for the trip to Macon. On arriving at Macon, Colonel Pritchard, Captain Hudson and Lieutenant's Stauber and Purinton, with 22 men were detailed to escort Davis to Washington D.C.

There having been a reward, of 100,000 dollars, posted for the capture of Davis, the men of the 4th. were naturally elated at their good fortune, however, the War Department appointed a commission that decided that the men of the 4th. were indeed entitled to the money, but when Congress approved the appropriation, a claim was immediately put forth by the men of the 1st. Wisconsin. It was not until July of 1868 that a bill authorizing the payment was passed, and at that time Congress felt the reward be shared by both the 4th. Michigan and the 1st. Wisconsin.

When the money was distributed, it was shared equally by all men who had participated in the expedition.

The Fourth gained a national reputation, with world wide notoriety, by the capture of Davis. It was an accomplishment of an eminently special and important duty, for the nation, so distinctive and definite in its character, as to render a like service impossible, giving it a place in the history of the war, without parallel.

The Regiment, while feeling its duty was more than aptly performed, and that the war was indeed finally complete, returned to Nashville, on the 1st. of July, where they were mustered out of service and paid off. Returning to Michigan, they arrived at Detroit, where they were disbanded on the 10th.

During their term of Federal service, they were engaged at:

Stamford, KyGallatin, TnLebanon, Tn
Rural Hill, TnBaird's Mill, TnHollow Tree Gap, Tn
Wilson's Creek Road, TnPurdy, TnFranklin, Tn
Wilson Creek, TnLavernge, TnJefferson's Bridge, Tn
Nashville Pike, TnStone River, TnManchester Pike, Tn
Harpeth River, TnBradyville, TnWoodbury, Tn
Rover, TnCharlotte, TnAuburn, Tn
Liberty, TnUnionville, TnThompson's Station, Tn
Rutherford Creek, TnDuck River, TnProsperity Church, Tn
Snow Hill, TnMcMinnville, TnStatesville, Tn
Alexandria, Tn Wartrace, Tn Middletown, Tn
Versailles, Tn Cherry Valley, Tn Shelbyville, Tn
Hickory Creek, Tn Tullahoma, Tn Rock Island, Tn
Sparta, Tn Sperry Mill, Tn Smith's Cross Roads, Tn
Reed's Bridge, Tn Chickamauga, Ga Rossville, Ga
Cotton Port, Tn Hill Creek, Tn Chattanooga, Tn
Cleveland, Tn Mission Ridge, Tn Tunnel Hill, Ga
Mission Bridge, Ga Arundel Creek, Ga Kingston, Ga
Dallas, Ga Villa Rica, Ga Lost Mountain, Ga
Big Shanty, Ga McAfee's Cross Roads, Ga Noonday Creek, Ga
Kenesaw Mountain, Ga Rosswell, Ga Lebanon Mills, Ga
Stone Mountain, Ga Covington, Ga Flat Rock Creek, Ga
Atlanta, Ga Fair Oaks, Ga Jonesboro, Ga
Lovejoys Station, Ga McDonough's, Ga Rosswell, Ga
Sweet Water, Ga Moses Creek, Ga New Hope Church, Ga
Stilesboro, Ga Rome, Ga Blue Pond, Ga
Selma, Al Double Bridge, Ga Macon, Ga

ORGANIZATION

Organized at Detroit, Mich., and mustered in August 28, 1862.
Left State for Louisville, Ky., September 26.
Attached to 1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Ohio to November, 1862.
1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to January, 1863.
1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to October, 1863.
2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to November, 1863.
1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to November, 1864.
1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi to November, 1864.
2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi to July, 1865.
Mustered out July 1, 1865.

1861-1865

Total Enrollment2217
Killed in Action32
Died of Wounds15
Died of Disease328
Total Casualty Rate16.9%

1897 Greenville, Michigan State Grand Army of the Republic Badge

SOLD!!!
A very nice badge worn by Michigan Union veterans at the 1897 Department of Michigan Grand Army of the Republic Encampment held in Greenville, Michigan in 1897.  A brass colored hanger has a red colored ribbon attached.  Written in gold colored ink on the ribbon is "19th Annual Encampment MICHIGAN - Greenville - April 7 & 8, 1897".  A celluloid drop is attached to the ribbon.  On the front of the drop is a likeness of William Shakespeare, Michigan G.A.R. Department Commander.  Written around the likeness is "Department Commander - WM. SHAKESPEARE - Michigan G.A.R. 1897".  The back of the drop has a likeness of the Grand Army of the Republic membership badge.  Written around the likeness is "Presented By The Citizens of Greenville.".  The badge was made by the C.S. Cole & Co., Chicago, Illinois as noted on the back of the ribbon.

1907 Bay City, Michigan Grand Army of the Republic State Badge

SOLD!!!
Offered is a nice badge worn by Michigan Union veterans at their state Grand Army of the Republic encampment held in Bay City in 1907.  The hanger is a bronze colored medal with the Grand Army of the republic logo in the middle.  Written around the G.A.R. logo is "Bay City - June 1907".  A red ribbon is attached to the hanger.  Attached to the bottom of the ribbon is a metal piece with "DELEGATE" written on it.  A drop is attached to the metal piece below the ribbon.  In the middle of the drop is a likeness of a man, probably the Commander of the Michigan Division of the Grand Army of the Republic.  Written around the male likeness is "29th Annual Encampment - Dept. of Michigan".  On the back of the drop is the state seal of Michigan.  

6 Michigan Infantry 1911 Reunion Ribbon

SOLD!!!
Offered is a nice paper ribbon worn by members of the 6th Michigan Infantry & Heavy Artillery at their 1911 reunion held in Kalamazoo, Michigan.  On the top of the ribbon is a likeness of Col. F.W. Curtenius.  Written below the likeness of the Colonel is "38th Annual Reunion Sixth Michigan Volunteer Infantry - Heavy Artillery - Aug. 22, 1911 at Kalamazoo - Fifty years ago, August 20, 1861, we were mustered into the U.S. Army as the Sixth Michigan Volunteer Infantry in the City of Kalamazoo.".  The paper ribbon is approximately 8 inches tall and 2 5/8 inches wide.


The 6th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment lost 2 officers and 76 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 6 officers and 498 enlisted men to disease during the Civil War. In July of 1863 it was converted to a heavy artillery regiment after the siege of Port Hudson.

1861
Organized at Kalamazoo, Mich.
August 20Mustered in
August 30Left State for Baltimore, Md., Attached to Dix’s Command, Baltimore, Md.
November 11-December 8Expedition to eastern shore of Maryland
1862
February 22Ordered to Fortress Monroe, Va. and attached to Butler’s New Orleans Expedition
March 4Sailed with Gen. Butler’s Expedition against New Orleans, La., on Transport “Constitution”
March 13Arrived at Ship Island, Miss. Attached to 2nd Brigade, Dept. of the Gulf
April 25-28Operations against Forts St. Phillip and Jackson
May 2Occupation of New Orleans. One of the first Regiments to occupy the city.
May 9-10Expedition to New Orleans & Jackson Railroad
May 13Moved to Baton Rouge, La.
May 14-29Reconnaissance to Warrenton
May 16Grand Gulf
May 20Vicksburg
May 27Grand Gulf
June-JulyCamp at Baton Rouge
July 20-30Expedition to Camp Moore
August 5Battle of Baton Rouge
August 20Evacuation of Baton Rouge
August 22-December 6Guard duty at Metaria Ridge
NovemberAttached to Sherman’s Division, Dept. of the Gulf
1863
January 12-15Expedition to Bayou Teche attached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 19th Army Corps, Dept. of the Gulf
January 14Action with Steamer “Cotton”
January-MarchDuty at Camp Parapet and Kenner
March 21-30Expedition to Ponchatoula (1 company)
March 24Capture of Ponchatoula
March 26Skirmish at Ponchatoula
April 12Manchac Pass, Amite River
May 9-18Raid on Amite River & Jackson Railroad, destroying over $400,000 worth of property.
May 13Ponchatoula
May 15Camp Moore
May 21-23Moved to New Orleans, thence to Port Hudson
May 24-July 9Siege of Port Hudson
May 27 & June 14Assaults on Port Hudson
July 9Surrender of Port Hudson
July 10Regiment received thanks of Gen. Banks for gallant and efficient services during the siege and was by his orders converted into a Regiment of Heavy Artillery, to retain its Infantry number, and to have the organization pay and equipment prescribed by law for troops of the Artillery arms.
July 30Order approved by Secretary of War
AugustRegiment on garrison duty at Port Hudson, La. assigned to District of Port Hudson, La., Dept. of the Gulf
November 8Action at Tunica Bayou, La.
1864
June 6-24Moved to Morganza, La. and duty there as Infantry attached to Bailey’s Engineer Brigade, Dept. of the Gulf
June 24At Vicksburg, Miss.
July 23Moved to mouth of White River, thence to St. Charles, Ark.
July 24Ashton, Ark.
August 23Ordered to Mobile Bay, Ala. and attached to U.S. Forces, Mobile Bay, Dept. of the Gulf

Companies A, B, D, G and K garrison at Fort Morgan

Companies C, E, F, H and I garrison at Fort Gaines

December 23 – January 31Companies B, C, E, F and H detached on Granger’s Expedition to Mobile
DecemberAssigned to District Southern Alabama, Dept. of the Gulf

 

1865
March 31Companies A and K detached from Fort Morgan
March 31-April 8Companies A and K – Siege of Spanish Fort
April 8Companies A and K – Siege of Forts Huger and Tracy
April 9Companies A and K garrison Fort Blakely
April 20Companies A and K return to Fort Morgan.
April 10 – July 9Company B detached from Fort Morgan to Navy Cove

Company E detached from Fort Gaines at Fort Powell

July 9Regiment ordered to New Orleans, La. and duty there
August 20Mustered out
September 5Discharged at Jackson Mich.

124 Indiana Infantry 1913 Reunion Badge

SOLD!!!
Offered is a great badge worn by members of the 124th Indiana Infantry at their 1913 reunion held in Lynn, Indiana.  The hanger is a large celluloid button with the likeness of Chaplain R.H. Sparks on it.  A red, white, and blue ribbon is attached to the hanger.  Written in gold type ink is "124th INDIANA INFANTRY  37th Annual Reunion - Lynn, Indiana - Oct. 1 - 2, 1913".  The badge is made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.  

124th Indiana Infantry Regimental History
One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry. — Cols., James Burgess, John M. Orr; Lieut. -Cols., John M. Orr, Henry H. Neff, Henry S. Gibson; Majs., Henry H. Neff, Henry S. Gibson, John Messick. This regiment was organized by the consolidation of three companies, raised in the 6th Congressional district for the 125th regiment, and seven companies raised in the 5th Congressional district, rendezvousing at Richmond. It was mustered in March 10, 1864, left the state on the 19th, proceeding to Nashville via Louisville, and was assigned to the division command by Gen. Hovey. On April 5, it proceeded to Athens, Tenn., where the left wing was detached and sent to Columbus. With its corps it marched toward Red Clay, Ga., being joined at Columbus by the left wing. It was in an engagement at Buzzard Roost ; in frequent skirmishes in the vicinity of Resaca and Kingston; in sharp fighting at Lost mountain, and was actively engaged at Kennesaw mountain. Col. Burgess resigned July 9, and Lieut. -Col. Orr was promoted colonel. The regiment was in a constant skirmish until Atlanta was reached; was in the battle of Atlanta on the 22nd; took part in the siege of Atlanta; fought at Jonesboro, and then remained in camp at Decatur until Oct. 4, when it accompanied the column in pursuit of Hood; had a sharp skirmish at the Oostanaula river; continued the pursuit as far as Gaylesville, Ala.; moved via Cedar bluffs and Dalton to Nashville, where it joined Gen. Thomas' command. It next moved for Pulaski, reaching there on the 15th, and proceeding thence to Columbia, where it was in a brisk skirmish for two days. On the march toward Franklin it was in a brisk fight at Spring Hill, where Co. C was captured. It was in the battle of Franklin, Nov. 30, repelling every assault, was next engaged in the battle of Nashville, and joined in pursuit of Hood as far as Columbia, whence it moved to Clifton, embarked for Cincinnati, moved thence to Washington, which was reached on Jan. 30, 1865; then sailed for Morehead City, N. C, which was reached Feb. 27. From New Berne, it marched towards Kinston, being engaged at Wise's Forks, and aiding in repulsing an assault. From Kinston it marched for Goldsboro, where a junction was effected with Sherman's army on March 21. It was stationed at Lenoir institute for a short time, moving for Greensboro May 3, thence to Charlotte, where it went into camp. It returned to Greensboro July 13, remained there until Aug. 31, when it was mustered out. The original strength was 958; gain by recruits 79; total, 1,037. Loss by death, 149; desertion, 37; unaccounted for 6.

Footnotes:
Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 3


1899 Indiana Grand Army of the Republic State Terre Haute Badge

SOLD!!!

Offered is a nice badge worn by Indiana Union veterans at the 1899 state reunion held in Terre Haute.  The badge has a bronze colored metal hanger with the word "SOUVENIR" on it.  An U.S. flag ribbon is attached to the hanger.  A celluloid drop is attached to the ribbon.  A likeness of Fort Harrison is in the middle of the drop.  Written around the likeness is "20th Annual Encampment, G.A.R. - Terre Haute, Ind. - Ft. Harrison - May 23 - 25, '99.".  The badge is made by the Whitehead & Hoag COmpnay of Newark, New Jersey as noted on the back of the drop.


Army of the Shenandoah Veterans Survivors Association Badge

SOLD!!!

A super badge worn by members of the Army of Shenandoah Veterans Survivors Association.  In order to be a member of the Army of the Shenandoah you had to fight in units that were in the Army of the Shenandoah.  The hanger of this badge has "ARMY OF THE SHENANDOAH" written on it.  It is surrounded by black enamel.  Attached to the hanger are two crossed rifles.  On top of the rifles is written "Veteran Survivors Association" surrounded by white enamel.  The drop is attached is a drop in the shape of the Eighth Corp badge with blue enamel.  In the middle of the drop is the 22nd Corp badge in red enamel.  On the back of the hanger is "214 PA VOLS.".


95 Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Ladder Type Badge

SOLD!!!
Offered is a wonderful badge worn by members of the 95th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infanty.  This great badge was worn by a member of Company A of the 95th Pennsylvania Infantry.  The hanger has "CO. A" written on it.  The drop is in the shape of the Sixth Corps badge.  Written on the drop is "95 PA. VOL. INF.".  

95th Pennsylvania Infantry

Online Books
95th Pennsylvania Infantry Soldier Roster - History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-5, Volume 3 by Samuel P Bates, 1869    

Regimental History
Ninety-fifth Infantry. — Cols., John M. Gosline, Gustavus W. Town, Thomas J. Town, John Harper ; Lieut.-Cols., Gustavus W. Town, Elisha Hall, Edward Carroll, J. G. C. MacFarlan, John Harper, John A. Ward; Majs., William B. Hubbs, David F. Foley, Thomas J. Town, Theodore H. McCalla, Francis J. Randall, Hugh O. Roberts, John Harper, John A. Ward, W. J. MacDonald. The 95th, many of whose members had belonged to the militia or had served with the three months' troops, was composed of men from Philadelphia and vicinity, excepting one company, which was recruited in Burlington county, N. J. It was mustered into the U. S. service from Aug. 23 to Oct. 16, 1861, at Philadelphia, for a three years' term, and went into camp at Hestonville. It left camp for Washington on Oct. 12 and was attached to Gen. Newton's brigade which was stationed at Fairfax seminary in an instruction camp. It engaged in the Peninsular campaign early in 1862 and suffered severe losses at Gaines' mill. It joined Pope's army after Bull Run and Chantilly; was engaged at Crampton's gap and Antietam ; participated in the battle of Fredericksburg, and went into winter quarters near White Oak Church, where it remained until the Chancellorsville action in the spring of 1863, in which it lost many men. It reached Gettysburg on July 2 and was ordered into action the same day. After the battle it camped at Warrenton and performed picket duty at New Baltimore and Culpeper, going into winter quarters near Hazel river. At the end of the year 245 members of the regiment reenlisted and were furloughed. On May 2 the veteran regiment broke camp, and as part of Upton's brigade, Russell's division, 6th corps, joined the Army of the Potomac for the Wilderness campaign. It took part in all the many engagements of the 6th corps until July 10, when it was ordered to Washington, where it was engaged at Fort Stevens, participating in the movements against Gen. Early which followed, and fighting at Fisher's hill and Cedar creek. On Oct. 15, 1864, the original members who had not reenlisted were ordered home for muster out and the regiment was reinforced by the addition of a battalion from the 96th. In December the 95th returned to Petersburg, where it spent the remainder of the winter. In the spring of 1865 it joined in the advance upon the city and after the evacuation, in the battle at Sailor's creek. It then moved to Danville, thence to Richmond and returned to Washington, where it was mustered out on July 17, 1865.

Footnotes:
Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 1


30 New York Infantry Iron Brigade 1892 Ribbon

SOLD!!!

Offered is avery nice, clean ribbon worn by members of the 30th New York Infantry at their 1892 reunion held in Saratoga Springs, New York.  This great ribbon has a First Corps symbol in the top center of the ribbon.  Written above it is "IRON BRIGADE".  Written below the First Corps symbol is "31st Anniversary of the SURVIVORS of the 30th REGIMENT N.Y.S. Vols. - Saratoga Springs, June 29, 1892".  The ribbon is approximately 6 7/8 inches tall and 2 5/8 inches wide.  This ribbon is clean and crisp!


The 30th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment lost 6 officers and 72 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 3 officers and 31 enlisted men to disease during the Civil War.

1861
Organized at Troy, N.Y. under Colonel Edward Frisby, Lieutenant Colonel Charles E. Brintnall and Major William M. Searing.
June 1Mustered in for two years service
June 28Left State for Washington, D.C.
June 29Arrived Washington and quartered at Caspari’s House
June 30Moved to Camp Union at Brightwood
July 23Crossed the Potomac, camping at Arlington
AugustTo Upton’s Hill. Worked on forts and picketed the Leesburg and Alexandria Pike attached to Keyes’ Brigade, Division of the Potomac
OctoberAttached to Keyes’ Brigade, McDowell’s Division, Army of the Potomac
November 16
Doolan’s Farm

A detachment from the regiment fought here and lost 1 enlsted man killed and 2 officers and 28 enlisted men captured

1862
MarchAttached to Augur’s Brigade, King’s 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac
March 10March to Centerville and Manassas, Va.
March 11Lt. Colonel Brintball resigned due to disability. Major Searing was promoted to lieutenant colonel and Captain Morgan H. Chrysler of Company G to major
March 15To Alexandria
April 9-19McDowell’s Advance on Falmouth, Va.
April 5To Manassas. Attached to 1st Brigade, King’s Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock and duty at Fredericksburg, Va., which became known as the “Iron Brigade of the East”
April 6To Bristoe
April 15To within 15 miles of Falmouth; skirmished with enemy and drove them across the Rappahannock.
May 29To Front Royal via Catlett’s Station, Bristo, Manassas Junction, Gainsville, Haymarket, Salem and Thoroughfare Gap
June 1-21Operations against Jackson; attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps. Pope’s Army of Northern Virginia
June 2To Falmouth
June 15Arrived at Falmouth
June 24Reconnoissance to Orange Court House. Skirmished with the enemy at Gordonsville and fell back to Falmouth
August 5Supported Gibbon’s reconnoissance to Hanover Court House; repulsed attack by Confederate cavalry on forage train
August 10To Culpeper and Cedar Mountain, arriving the day after the battle
August 16Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia
August 18Fell back from the Rapidan, crossing the Rappahannock at the railroad station and holding the crossing against the enemy
August 20-23Fords of the Rappahannock
August 28
Thoroughfare Gap

Private Patrick Walsh was killed. Picketed the battlefield until next daybreak and returned to Manassas.

August 29
Battle of Groveton

The regiment lost Lieutenant Philip Rice and Privates William Seeley and Edmund Valley killed and 4 enlisted men wounded

August 30
2nd Battle of Bull Run

The regiment fought for two hours in an open field before the railroad embankment. It lost Colonel Frisby, Lieutenants Francis Dargen, William Morse, 2 other officers and 59 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 4 officers and 76 enlisted men wounded, and 2 officers and 34 enlisted men missing or captured out of 341 engaged. Eight color bearers were shot down, and 36 balls passed through the flag. It was finally forced to withdraw when the regiment exhausted its 100 rounds per man and was reduced to scrouging from the cartridge boxes of the dead.

September 6-22Maryland Campaign; attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac
September 14
Battle of South Mountain

The regiment lost 5 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 4 wounded out of 110 men engaged

September 16-17
Battle of Antietam

Commanded by Colonel William M. Searing, the regiment lost 6 enlisted men killed, 5 mortally wounded, and 1 missing or captured out of 49 men engaged. By the end of the day only 27 officers and men were still available for duty.

From the brigade marker on the Antietam battlefield:

Phelps’ Brigade formed line at 5:30 A. M. on September 17, and moved in support of Gibbon’s Brigade. When Gibbon deployed, 135 yards north of this in the Cornfield and on the plateau west of the Hagerstown Pike, Phelps’ Brigade (425 officers and men) halted 25 paces in his rear, in the Cornfield. After Gibbon advanced and became heavily engaged on both sides of the Pike, Phelps moved to the support of his left and fought on this ground. The subsequent movements of this Brigade conformed to those of Gibbon. After heavy loss it retired to the fields north of D. R. Miller’s and thence beyond the Poffenberger Lane.

SeptemberDuty in Maryland. The regiment received 200 recruits and five new officers.
September 20Lt. Colonel Searing promoted to colonel and Major Chrysler to lieutenant colonel, both with rank to August 30
October 29Movement to Falmouth, Va.
October 30Crossed the Potomac at the pontoon bridge at Berlin, crossed Bull Run Mountain and drove the enemy out of and occupied Warrenton.
November 1To Brooks Station on the Falmouth and Aquia Creek Railroas. Captain Albert Perry of Company F promoted to major.
December 7Two companies consolidated and a new company joins regiment as Company F
December 12-15
Battle of Fredericksburg

The regiment spent three days on skirmish duty on the left flank of the army, losing 2 enlisted men killed and 14 wounded out of 406 men engaged.

1863
January 20-34“Mud March”
FebruaryAt Falmouth
April 27-May 6Chancellorsville Campaign
April 29-May 2
Operations at Pollock’s Mill Creek

The regiment lost 1 enlisted man wounded

May 2-5
Battle of Chancellorsville

The regiment lost 1 enlisted man wounded

May 24Three years’ men transferred to 76th Regiment New York Infantry inclluding five officers who all became casualties at Gettysburg.
May 28Left the front to return to New York
June 18Mustered out , expiration of term, under Colonel Searing, Lt. Colonel Chrysler and Major Perry.
June 23Colonel Chrysler was authorized to reorganize the regiment for three years service as a mounted regiment, at first called the Empire Light Cavalry but then designated the 2nd New York Veteran Cavalry

15 New Jersey Infantry 1908 Trip Badge - Richmond & Petersburg, Virginia

SOLD!!!
A great badge worn by members of the 15th New Jersey Infantry on a trip to Washington, D.C., Richmond, Virginia, and Petersburg, Virginia.  The hanger is a celluloid button with the likeness of the 15th New Jersey Infantry regimental badge in the middle of the button.  Written around the likeness of the 15th's badge is "15th Regt. N.J. Volunteer's Veteran Ass'n".  Two ribbons are attached to the celluloid button.  One ribbon is blue and the other is gray.  Written in gold colored ink on the blue ribbon is "Washington, D.C.".  Written on the gray ribbon is "Richmond and Petersburg, VA.".  A paper insert on the back of the celluloid button says "May 19 - 23, 1908".  

20 New York Infantry 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Antietam Reunion Badge

SOLD!!!
This is an extremely hard bad to find!  Only 20 members of the 20 New York Infantry were able to attend this reunion held at Antietam battle field!  The badge is made of a silver colored metal.  An eagle is on the top of the hanger.  Written under the eagle is "20th Regiment New York Volunteers - Sept. 17, 1912."  Also uneder the eagle is a white enameled 4th Corps symbol with "20" on it.  A red, white, and blue ribbon is attached to the hanger.  The drop has the likeness of Abraham Lincoln in the middle.  Written on the drop is "50th ANNI. Battle of Antietam - 1862 - 1912 - Abraham Lincoln".  Since only 20 or less veterans were able to attend this reunion, this is a very hard badge to find!

See the source image


Additional Pages
1  2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61  [Next Page]

Cash, Check, Money Order, and PayPal
We now accept PAYPAL for those of you who would like to use credit cards!  Please send to vann@veteransattic.com .
 
Your satisfaction and happiness is our major concern.  We will be glad to refund your purchase price if you are not happy with your purchase if returned within fifteen days of your receipt.
 
You can order through our web site or you can call 803-431-1798 for your order.  Sales are complete when we confirm items are still in stock.
 
We ship using the United States Post Office.
 
 
Featured Item
32 Reunion, Grand Camp of Virginia, Harrisonburg, Virginia Ribbon

$185.00
Catalog update 07/29/2020
 Antietam
 Civil War Items
 Civil War Photographs
 Civil War Reference Books
 GETTYSBURG!
 Grand Army of the Republic
 Indian War and Western
 Mansfield, Ohio Civil War Show - May 2 - 3, 2015
 Nashville (Franklin) Show, December 2011
 Revolutionary War
 SOLD Items
 Spanish American War
 United Confederate Veteran
 World War 1
About Us!
Contact Information
Home Page
Your Account

Copyright © 2020 The Veteran’s Attic
Powered by Web-Cat Copyright © 1996-2020 GrayCat Systems