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General John C. Bowen CDV

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A nice CDV of General John S. Bowen. Bowen was born in Savannah, Georgia and graduated from West Point. Before the war he was an architect in St. Louis, Missouri. He was appointed colonel of the 1st Missouri Infantry. He was promoted to brigadier general on March 14, 1862 and major general May 25, 1863. He was wounded at Shiloh and died after the surrender of Vicksburg on July 13, 1863. The backmark on this CDV is "Published by E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, from Photographic Negative in BRADY'S National Portrait Gallery". A period ink identification is on the back of the CDV.
 
Major-General John S. Bowen was born in Georgia in 1829. He was appointed to the United States military academy in 1848 and on graduation was promoted to brevet second-lieutenant, July 1, 1853. Being assigned to the Mounted Rifles, he served at the Carlisle cavalry school, and on the frontier, with promotion to second lieutenant on July 20, 1854. He resigned his commission on the 1st of May, 1856, and became an architect in Savannah, GA, continuing to gratify his military tastes as lieutenant-colonel of Georgia militia. He removed to St. Louis, Mo., in 1857, where he also followed the business of an architect. From 1859 to 1861 he was captain in the Missouri militia. He was adjutant to General Frost during his expedition to the Kansas border in search of Montgomery, a prominent character in the Kansas troubles. When the civil war began he commanded the Second regiment of Frost's brigade. He was acting chief-of-staff to Frost when Camp Jackson was captured by General Lyon. Going to Memphis, Tenn., and into the southeastern part of Missouri, he raised the First Missouri regiment of infantry, of which he was commissioned colonel on June 11, 1861. He was assigned to the army of General Polk at Columbus, Ky., and acted as brigade commander under that officer's command. When in the spring of 1862 Albert Sidney Johnston and Beauregard were concentrating their armies for an attack upon Grant, Bowen, who on March 14h had received his commission as brigadier-general, was assigned to the division of John C. Breckinridge. In the first day's battle at Shiloh he was wounded. General Beauregard, in his official report of the battle thus speaks: "Brig.Gens. B. R. Johnson and Bowen, most meritorious officers, were also severely wounded in the first combat, but it is hoped will soon be able to return to duty with their brigades." When in 1863 Grant crossed the Mississippi and landed at Bruinsburg, General Bowen, though fearfully outnumbered, threw himself in his path and with the utmost courage and determination, resisted his advance. After a patriotic sacrifice he was forced back upon the main army under Pemberton. On the 25th of May he was rewarded for his brave work at Port Gibson by the commission of major-general in the army of the Confederate States. He fought with distinction in the other battles outside of Vicksburg, and in all the fighting and suffering of the long siege he and his men had their full share. At the fall of the city he was paroled, and went to Raymond, Miss., where he died from sickness contracted during the siege, July 16, 1863.

General John C. Pemberton CDV

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A nice image of General John C. Pemberton, the defender of Vicksburg.  Pemberton was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1814 and graduated from West Point in 1837.  In 1848 he married Martha Thompson of Norfolk, Virginia.  In 1861 he resigned the US Regular Army, and was commisioned into the Confederate Army.  He rose quickly in the ranks and eneded up a Lieutenant General in October 1862.  He was given command of the Department of Mississippi and Eastern Louisiana, an area which embraced the all important stronghold of Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He surrenedered Vicksburg to General U.S. Grant on July 4, 1863.  He resigned his Lieutenant General commision and served the rest of the war as a Colonel of artillery. 
 
The image does not have a backmark.  Written in pencil on the back of the image is "Lieut Genl John C. Pemeberton - Virginia - CSA". 

John Clifford Pemberton
(1814-1881)


Born August 10, 1814, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, John Clifford Pemberton's marriage to a Virginia woman influenced him to fight for the South. By wars end, he had become one of the Confederacy's most controversial generals.
An 1837 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, Pemberton saw action in the Second Seminole War and was decorated for bravery in the Mexican War. In peacetime, he proved to he an effective administrative officer. Though his defenders would later claim that Pemberton frequently exhibited antebellum pro-Southern sentiments, there is much evidence to the contrary When war broke out in 1861, he agonized for weeks before coming to Virginia to fight for his wife's native land.
Pemberton's first significant duty came in March 1862, when he was promoted to major general and took command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia. Always adept at military politics, he had moved rapidly upward in rank despite a lack of accomplishments.
The new commander soon was embroiled in controversy Many South Carolinians feared that the Northern-born general was not dedicated to an all-out defense of the department. Pemberton added to their fears by declaring that, if he had to make a choice, he would abandon the area rather than risk losing his outnumbered army When state officials complained to Robert B. Lee, Pemberton's predecessor and now adviser to Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Lee told Pemberton that he must defend the department at all cost. Pemberton was eventually relieved from command, but he had learned a fateful lesson from Lee.
Despite Pemberton's preference for administrative duties and his problems in South Carolina, Davis promoted him to lieutenant general and gave him arguably the most difficult command in the Confederacy Pemberton was to defend Vicksburg, a Mississippi city standing on high bluffs above the Mississippi River. Its defenses were the last major river obstacle to Union shipping.
Taking command of the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana on October 14, 1862, Pemberton immediately set to work solving supply problems and improving troop morale. For several months he enjoyed remarkable success, defeating attempts by Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant to take Vicksburg in the winter of 1862--1863.
In the spring, however, Grant confused Pemberton with a series of diversions and crossed the Mississippi below Vicksburg practically unnoticed. Grant was free to maneuver because Pemberton had remembered Lees admonishment and had fought to hold Vicksburg at all cost. Jefferson Davis reinforced Pemberton's thinking with an order not to give up the river city "for a single day" Now that Grant had successfully crossed the Mississippi, Pemberton determined to stay close to Vicksburg. Davis complicated matters by sending Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Mississippi to try to reverse declining Confederate fortunes. Johnston ordered Pemberton to unite his forces and attack Grant, if practicable, even if that meant abandoning the defense of Vicksburg.
Torn by conflicting orders, Pemberton marked time while Grant swept inland scoring a series of quick victories at Port Gibson, Raymond, and Jackson. Pemberton finally tried to please both Davis and Johnston. He moved his army east from Edwards Station, all the while maintaining close contact with Vicksburg. A new order from Johnston forced Pemberton to reverse his course and unite with Johnston's forces that had been defeated at Jackson. Before the order could be carried out, Pemberton's army bumped into Grants forces at Champions Hill and suffered a major defeat. Pemberton retreated to the Big Black River where he suffered more heavy losses. Remembering Lees and Davis's orders, Pemberton chose to ignore another order from Vicksburg. He would try to save the city even if that meant risking the loss of his army. He retreated into the city where he and his men endured a forty-seven day siege before surrendering on July 4, 1863. Pemberton became a pariah in the South and was accused by his immediate superior, General Johnston, of causing he Confederate disaster by disobeying orders.
John Pemberton might have made a positive contribution to the Confederate war effort had his talents been properly used. An able administrator, he was uncomfortable in combat. He had demonstrated his weaknesses in South Carolina, yet Davis had sent him to Mississippi anyway. A few months after Vicksburg, Pemberton displayed his loyalty to the Confederate cause by requesting a reduction in rank. He served the cause the remainder of the war as a lieutenant colonel of artillery in Virginia and South Carolina.
After the war he settled on a farm near Warrenton, Virginia, and eventually returned to his native Pennsylvania, where he died July 13, 1881, in the village of Penllyn. He is buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.
Source: MacMillan Information Now Encyclopedia "The Confederacy." Article by Michael B. Ballard

 

Brevet Brigadier General Joseph A. Potter - 15 U.S. Infantry - CDV

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A hard to find image of Brevet Brigadier General Joseph Adams Potter as a Colonel.  Potter is in a bust view and you can clearly see his eagle on his shoulder strap.  The backmark is "R.S. De Lamater - Photographer - 258 Main St. - 3 doors above Post Office - Hartford, CT.".  A green three cent revenue stamp is also attached to the back of the image.  Image can be confirmed on page 488 of "Brevet Brigadier Generals in Blue" by Roger Hunt.  Roger actually looked at this image and confirmed the image was Potter. 


General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson CDV

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A nice image from life of General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.  Jackson was Genneral Lee's commander to go to when he needed action or something to happen.  Jackson was wounded at Chancellorville and died ten days later.  There is no backmark on the back of this image.

General Bushrod Johnson - CSA - CDV

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A member of the Class of 1840, United States Military Acadamy at West Point, Bushrod Rust johnson saw service in the Seminole Warin Florida and the war with Mexico.  He resigned the army in 1847 to become a teacher at Western Military Institute at Georgetown, Kentucky and then the Military College of the University of Nashville.  Johnson was active in the militia of both states and entered service to the Confederacy as a colonel of engineers.  He was promoted to brigadier general in January 1862.  He was captured at Fort Donelson but escaped.  Later he was severly wounded at Shiloh.  After his recovery he led his brigade in the Kentucky campaign of 1862, at Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, and in the Knoxville campaign under Longstreet.   He was then transferred East, where he took part in the defense of Petersburg.  He was commisioned major general on May 21, 1864.  He served the rest of the war with the Army of Northern Virginia.  His division was shattered at Sayler's Creek.  He escaped but was on the parole records at Appomattox.  This image is missing the lower left corner.  The backmark is "E. & H.T. Anthony. 501 Broadway, New York, Manufacturers of the best Photographic Albumns.".


General Arnold Elzey - 1st Maryland Infantry - CDV

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A nice waist up photograph of General Arnold Elzey.  Elzey graduated from West Point in 1837.  He served in one of the Seminole uprising, won a brevet for gallantry in Mexico and was in command of the United States arsenal in Augusta, Georgia at the outbreak of the war.  He entered Confederate service as Colonel of the 1st Maryland Infantry.  He was promoted to brigadier general for his services at the battle of First Manassas.  He also distinquished himself in the Shenandoah campaign of 1862 and in the beginning of the Seven Day's fighting around Richmond, where he was desperately wounded and incapacitaed for many months.  Upon his partial recovery he was promoted major general on December 4, 1862.  He commanded the Department of Richmond and towards the end of the war he acted as chief of artillery for the Army of the Tennessee for some time.  He did not participate in Hood's Tennessee campaign.  He was paroled at Washington, Georgia on May 9, 1865.  The backmark on this image is "E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, Manufactures of the best Photographic Albums".


General James R. Chalmers - Forrest's Cavalry - CDV

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Here is a nice image of General James R. Chalmers of Forrest's Cavalry.  Chalmers started the Civil War as Colonel of the 9th Mississippi Infantry.  he was promoted to brigadier generral in February 1862 and fought at Shiloh under General Withers.  He led his brigade in the invasion of kentucky under General Bragg and at the battle of Murfreesboro, after which he transferred to cavalry.  He was given a division under General Forrest and fought with him in Northern Mississippi, Kentucky, and Tennessee.  Distinctly an individualist, his relations with Forrest were not always completely harmonious, although his ability and gallantry were unquestioned.  The image has a E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York" backmark.
 

Early life

Born to Mississippi congressman Joseph Williams Chalmers near Lynchburg, Virginia, Chalmers later moved with his family to Jackson, Tennessee, in 1835 and, three years later, to Holly Springs, Mississippi. He later attended St. Thomas Hall.

Studying law at South Carolina College (now present day University of South Carolina) in Columbia, South Carolina, Chalmers graduated in 1851 and, at the age of 21, attended as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention of 1852, before being admitted to the bar the following year.

Chalmers began practicing law upon his return to Holly Springs and, in 1858, later served as district attorney for the seventh judicial district of Mississippi before participating in the secession convention of Mississippi in January 1861.

Military service

Confederate Cavalry General James Ronald Chalmers

In March 1861, Chalmers enlisted in the Confederate Army as a captain and, despite no prior military experience, was elected Colonel of the 9th Mississippi Infantry Regiment the next month.

Stationed at Pensacola, Florida, during the first few months of the war, Chalmers was promoted to brigadier general on February 13, 1862, and later fought under General Withers at the Battle of Shiloh on April 6.

On July 1, 1862, Chalmers' force of nearly 5,000 infantry engaged in battle with Union Col. Philip Sheridan at a forward outpost near Booneville, Mississippi, and, during the subsequent Battle of Booneville, was defeated by the 31-year-old Union officer both by superior weaponry and by repeatedly moving Union troops off military transport trains, deceiving enemy forces into believing the Sheridan's command (only numbering 827 men) to be much larger than their own.

Despite this embarrassing defeat, Chalmers went on to have a successful military career, taking part in the Kentucky Campaign under General Braxton Bragg and as a brigade commander at the Battle of Stones River, where he was wounded at "Hell's Half-Acre".

In 1863, Chalmers was appointed commander of the District of Mississippi and East Louisiana before his transfer to the first division of Maj. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry corps the following year. Earning the nickname "Little 'Un" while under Forrest, Chalmers saw action in Confederate military operations in North Mississippi, Kentucky, and West Tennessee, as well service with the Confederate Army of Tennessee during Lt. Gen. John B. Hood's 1864 campaign. He was paroled in Gainesville, Alabama, on May 10, 1865.[1]

Later years

In the years following the war, Chalmers returned to Mississippi where he resumed his law career and, as a prominent Mississippi political figure during Reconstruction, served as a member of the state senate from 1876 to 1877. After Mississippi's readmission into the Union, Chalmers was elected a U.S. Representative for the state for three terms in 1877, 1878, and 1882 respectively. Although failing in three other bids for election, contested by John R. Lynch and Van H. Manning, Chalmers retired from politics and, in 1888, moved to Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he continued his law practice until his death on April 9, 1898. He was buried in Memphis, Tennessee, at Elmwood Cemetery, Evergreen Section, Lot 448.

 
J. R. CHALMERS, son of the Hon. Judge Joseph W. Chalmers (who was in the United States Senate under Polk’s administration), was born in Halifax County, Virginia, on the 11th of January, 1831. He is the oldest and only survivor of seven children—four sons and three daughters. In 1834 or 1835 he removed with his father to Jackson, Tennessee, and thence to Holly Springs, Marshall County, Mississippi, in 1839, where he was sent to school and prepared for college, which he entered at Columbia, South Carolina, in September, 1848, where he graduated in December, 1851, taking the second honor in a class of about fifteen. Returning to Holly Springs, he at once entered upon the study of law in the office of Barton & Chalmers, the firm being composed of his father and the great and gifted Roger Barton. In 1852 he was a delegate to the Democratic Convention which nominated Franklin Pierce for President. The next year he began to practice law at Holly Springs, and in 1857 he was elected District Attorney of the Seventh Judicial District, over several worthy and popular competitors. He was soon recognized as one of the ablest prosecuting attorneys in the State, and greatly increased and strengthened his popularity. He was a delegate from DeSoto County to the Mississippi State Convention, which passed the ordinance of secession, in January, 1861, and chairman of the military committee in that body.

The subject of this sketch was elected Colonel of the Ninth Mississippi Regiment of infantry, which was the first that entered the Confederate service from that State. His first engagement was a successful attack upon Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island, south of Pensacola, Florida.

Chalmers was appointed Brigadier-General on the 13th of February, 1862, and was in command of the forces that drove Sherman and his gunboats back from Eastport, Mississippi, on March 12th, and thus saved Bear Creek bridge from destruction, and the Memphis and Charleston Railroad from falling into the hands of the enemy. At the battle of Shiloh he commanded the extreme right brigade, and made the last charge on Sunday that was made by the Confederates on that eventful day. Balls passed through his clothing, and his horse was shot from under him on Monday. When the Confederate army fell back to Tupelo, Bragg assigned Chalmers to a cavalry command for a short time, but having been recalled to take charge of his infantry brigade, he went with Bragg on his Kentucky campaign. The former made an unsuccessful attack upon Mumfordsville, and was complimented by the latter for what he did. At the battle of Murfreesboro General Chalmers was severely wounded, and before he had fully recovered from the effect of his wound he was assigned by Bragg to the command of the cavalry in Northwest Mississippi, at the special request of the Governor of that State—Pettus.

General Chalmers now went to work in his new field and organized the “squads” and companies into regiments, which afterward, under his command, formed a prominent part in that terrible column that enabled Forrest to perform his wondrous feats and made his name immortal, causing him to go down the ages as the “Wizard of the Saddle.” General Chalmers commanded the first division of Forrest’s Cavalry from January, 1864, to the close of the war, as fully set forth in the preceding pages of this work, to which I refer the reader for the balance of the military career of this gallant and noble officer. He accepted the terms of surrender in good faith, and returned to his home in North Mississippi, where he again began the practice of his profession—the law.

In 1872 he was on the electoral ticket in Mississippi for Horace Greeley; in 1872 he was elected to the State Senate; in 1876 he was elected to Congress, from what is known as the “Shoe-string District,” and again in 1878, without opposition. In 1880 he was returned as elected, but was unseated in a contest by John R. Lynch, the Republican candidate. General Chalmers then removed from Vicksburg to Sardis, Mississippi, and in 1882 became an independent Democratic candidate for Congress against V. H. Manning, the regular Democratic nominee, and after a close, exciting canvass was elected, but by some sort of manipulation or legerdemain at Jackson by the Governor and Secretary of State, he was refused his certificate of election, though he was finally seated by a Democratic House, after a most exciting contest between Manning and himself. In 1884 and 1886 he was again a candidate against the Hon. J. B. Morgan, the regular Democratic nominee, and while there is but little doubt in the minds of his friends that he was elected both times, yet the certificate of election was given to his opponent.

As a speaker, General Chalmers is fluent, bold, pointed, and fearless. In his style he draws occasionally upon a cultivated and exuberant fancy, but indulges more frequently in pointed and racy anecdote. As a friend, he is sincere, true, and devoted; as an enemy, fearless and inflexible; but at all times just and generous, as ready to atone for a wrong, when he is convinced that he has committed one, as he is, upon the other hand, steadfast and immovable when satisfied that he is right.

I take the following from a letter recently received from Colonel C. R. Barteau:

“I meet General Chalmers frequently, and he inquires about your book. As I know him better, I love and appreciate the man. His talent is of a high order, his character spotless, and his moral courage beyond all question.”

The general is now (1887) engaged in the practice of law in the city of Memphis, Tennessee, in connection with his former comrade-in-arms and almost lifetime friend, Colonel Thomas W. Harris. They are recognized as among the leaders and most efficient of the Southern bar.


J. R. CHALMERS, son of the Hon. Judge Joseph W. Chalmers (who was in the United States Senate under Polk’s administration), was born in Halifax County, Virginia, on the 11th of January, 1831. He is the oldest and only survivor of seven children—four sons and three daughters. In 1834 or 1835 he removed with his father to Jackson, Tennessee, and thence to Holly Springs, Marshall County, Mississippi, in 1839, where he was sent to school and prepared for college, which he entered at Columbia, South Carolina, in September, 1848, where he graduated in December, 1851, taking the second honor in a class of about fifteen. Returning to Holly Springs, he at once entered upon the study of law in the office of Barton & Chalmers, the firm being composed of his father and the great and gifted Roger Barton. In 1852 he was a delegate to the Democratic Convention which nominated Franklin Pierce for President. The next year he began to practice law at Holly Springs, and in 1857 he was elected District Attorney of the Seventh Judicial District, over several worthy and popular competitors. He was soon recognized as one of the ablest prosecuting attorneys in the State, and greatly increased and strengthened his popularity. He was a delegate from DeSoto County to the Mississippi State Convention, which passed the ordinance of secession, in January, 1861, and chairman of the military committee in that body.

The subject of this sketch was elected Colonel of the Ninth Mississippi Regiment of infantry, which was the first that entered the Confederate service from that State. His first engagement was a successful attack upon Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island, south of Pensacola, Florida.

Chalmers was appointed Brigadier-General on the 13th of February, 1862, and was in command of the forces that drove Sherman and his gunboats back from Eastport, Mississippi, on March 12th, and thus saved Bear Creek bridge from destruction, and the Memphis and Charleston Railroad from falling into the hands of the enemy. At the battle of Shiloh he commanded the extreme right brigade, and made the last charge on Sunday that was made by the Confederates on that eventful day. Balls passed through his clothing, and his horse was shot from under him on Monday. When the Confederate army fell back to Tupelo, Bragg assigned Chalmers to a cavalry command for a short time, but having been recalled to take charge of his infantry brigade, he went with Bragg on his Kentucky campaign. The former made an unsuccessful attack upon Mumfordsville, and was complimented by the latter for what he did. At the battle of Murfreesboro General Chalmers was severely wounded, and before he had fully recovered from the effect of his wound he was assigned by Bragg to the command of the cavalry in Northwest Mississippi, at the special request of the Governor of that State—Pettus.

General Chalmers now went to work in his new field and organized the “squads” and companies into regiments, which afterward, under his command, formed a prominent part in that terrible column that enabled Forrest to perform his wondrous feats and made his name immortal, causing him to go down the ages as the “Wizard of the Saddle.” General Chalmers commanded the first division of Forrest’s Cavalry from January, 1864, to the close of the war, as fully set forth in the preceding pages of this work, to which I refer the reader for the balance of the military career of this gallant and noble officer. He accepted the terms of surrender in good faith, and returned to his home in North Mississippi, where he again began the practice of his profession—the law.

In 1872 he was on the electoral ticket in Mississippi for Horace Greeley; in 1872 he was elected to the State Senate; in 1876 he was elected to Congress, from what is known as the “Shoe-string District,” and again in 1878, without opposition. In 1880 he was returned as elected, but was unseated in a contest by John R. Lynch, the Republican candidate. General Chalmers then removed from Vicksburg to Sardis, Mississippi, and in 1882 became an independent Democratic candidate for Congress against V. H. Manning, the regular Democratic nominee, and after a close, exciting canvass was elected, but by some sort of manipulation or legerdemain at Jackson by the Governor and Secretary of State, he was refused his certificate of election, though he was finally seated by a Democratic House, after a most exciting contest between Manning and himself. In 1884 and 1886 he was again a candidate against the Hon. J. B. Morgan, the regular Democratic nominee, and while there is but little doubt in the minds of his friends that he was elected both times, yet the certificate of election was given to his opponent.

As a speaker, General Chalmers is fluent, bold, pointed, and fearless. In his style he draws occasionally upon a cultivated and exuberant fancy, but indulges more frequently in pointed and racy anecdote. As a friend, he is sincere, true, and devoted; as an enemy, fearless and inflexible; but at all times just and generous, as ready to atone for a wrong, when he is convinced that he has committed one, as he is, upon the other hand, steadfast and immovable when satisfied that he is right.

I take the following from a letter recently received from Colonel C. R. Barteau:

“I meet General Chalmers frequently, and he inquires about your book. As I know him better, I love and appreciate the man. His talent is of a high order, his character spotless, and his moral courage beyond all question.”

The general is now (1887) engaged in the practice of law in the city of Memphis, Tennessee, in connection with his former comrade-in-arms and almost lifetime friend, Colonel Thomas W. Harris. They are recognized as among the leaders and most efficient of the Southern bar.


J. R. CHALMERS, son of the Hon. Judge Joseph W. Chalmers (who was in the United States Senate under Polk’s administration), was born in Halifax County, Virginia, on the 11th of January, 1831. He is the oldest and only survivor of seven children—four sons and three daughters. In 1834 or 1835 he removed with his father to Jackson, Tennessee, and thence to Holly Springs, Marshall County, Mississippi, in 1839, where he was sent to school and prepared for college, which he entered at Columbia, South Carolina, in September, 1848, where he graduated in December, 1851, taking the second honor in a class of about fifteen. Returning to Holly Springs, he at once entered upon the study of law in the office of Barton & Chalmers, the firm being composed of his father and the great and gifted Roger Barton. In 1852 he was a delegate to the Democratic Convention which nominated Franklin Pierce for President. The next year he began to practice law at Holly Springs, and in 1857 he was elected District Attorney of the Seventh Judicial District, over several worthy and popular competitors. He was soon recognized as one of the ablest prosecuting attorneys in the State, and greatly increased and strengthened his popularity. He was a delegate from DeSoto County to the Mississippi State Convention, which passed the ordinance of secession, in January, 1861, and chairman of the military committee in that body.

The subject of this sketch was elected Colonel of the Ninth Mississippi Regiment of infantry, which was the first that entered the Confederate service from that State. His first engagement was a successful attack upon Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island, south of Pensacola, Florida.

Chalmers was appointed Brigadier-General on the 13th of February, 1862, and was in command of the forces that drove Sherman and his gunboats back from Eastport, Mississippi, on March 12th, and thus saved Bear Creek bridge from destruction, and the Memphis and Charleston Railroad from falling into the hands of the enemy. At the battle of Shiloh he commanded the extreme right brigade, and made the last charge on Sunday that was made by the Confederates on that eventful day. Balls passed through his clothing, and his horse was shot from under him on Monday. When the Confederate army fell back to Tupelo, Bragg assigned Chalmers to a cavalry command for a short time, but having been recalled to take charge of his infantry brigade, he went with Bragg on his Kentucky campaign. The former made an unsuccessful attack upon Mumfordsville, and was complimented by the latter for what he did. At the battle of Murfreesboro General Chalmers was severely wounded, and before he had fully recovered from the effect of his wound he was assigned by Bragg to the command of the cavalry in Northwest Mississippi, at the special request of the Governor of that State—Pettus.

General Chalmers now went to work in his new field and organized the “squads” and companies into regiments, which afterward, under his command, formed a prominent part in that terrible column that enabled Forrest to perform his wondrous feats and made his name immortal, causing him to go down the ages as the “Wizard of the Saddle.” General Chalmers commanded the first division of Forrest’s Cavalry from January, 1864, to the close of the war, as fully set forth in the preceding pages of this work, to which I refer the reader for the balance of the military career of this gallant and noble officer. He accepted the terms of surrender in good faith, and returned to his home in North Mississippi, where he again began the practice of his profession—the law.

In 1872 he was on the electoral ticket in Mississippi for Horace Greeley; in 1872 he was elected to the State Senate; in 1876 he was elected to Congress, from what is known as the “Shoe-string District,” and again in 1878, without opposition. In 1880 he was returned as elected, but was unseated in a contest by John R. Lynch, the Republican candidate. General Chalmers then removed from Vicksburg to Sardis, Mississippi, and in 1882 became an independent Democratic candidate for Congress against V. H. Manning, the regular Democratic nominee, and after a close, exciting canvass was elected, but by some sort of manipulation or legerdemain at Jackson by the Governor and Secretary of State, he was refused his certificate of election, though he was finally seated by a Democratic House, after a most exciting contest between Manning and himself. In 1884 and 1886 he was again a candidate against the Hon. J. B. Morgan, the regular Democratic nominee, and while there is but little doubt in the minds of his friends that he was elected both times, yet the certificate of election was given to his opponent.

As a speaker, General Chalmers is fluent, bold, pointed, and fearless. In his style he draws occasionally upon a cultivated and exuberant fancy, but indulges more frequently in pointed and racy anecdote. As a friend, he is sincere, true, and devoted; as an enemy, fearless and inflexible; but at all times just and generous, as ready to atone for a wrong, when he is convinced that he has committed one, as he is, upon the other hand, steadfast and immovable when satisfied that he is right.

I take the following from a letter recently received from Colonel C. R. Barteau:

“I meet General Chalmers frequently, and he inquires about your book. As I know him better, I love and appreciate the man. His talent is of a high order, his character spotless, and his moral courage beyond all question.”

The general is now (1887) engaged in the practice of law in the city of Memphis, Tennessee, in connection with his former comrade-in-arms and almost lifetime friend, Colonel Thomas W. Harris. They are recognized as among the leaders and most efficient of the Southern bar.



Lt. Thomas J. Stotsbery - 22 Ohio Infantry & 53 USCT - CDV

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A rakish image of Lt. Thomas J. Stotsbery of Company A of the 22nd Ohio Infantry and Company F of the 53 United States Colored Troops.  Please note that this guys name is spelled Stateberry, Stotsbery, and Stotesberry in the different references I have found him.  I am using the Historical Data Systems spelling for his 53rd USCT record.  Stotsbery enlisted as a private in Compant A of the 22nd Ohio Infnatry in April 1861.  He mustered out in August 1861.  He was commisioned 2nd Lieutenant in Company F of the 53rd USCT in August 1863.  He resigned on July 18, 1864 as a 1st Lieutenant.  This guy looks like a bummer if I have ever seen one!  The image is pencil signed on the front of the carte 'Yours Truly - Thos. J. Stotesbery".  There is no backmark.
 
22nd Ohio Regiment Infantry (3 Months). Organized at Camp Jackson, Columbus, Ohio, April and May, 1861. Moved to Parkersburg, W. Va., May 30, thence to Burning Springs and Elizabethtown, and to Three Forks. Attached to Cox's Brigade, District of the Kanawha, W. Va. Operations against guerrillas in Gilmer, Calhoun and Braxton Counties and railroad guard duty till August. Mustered out August 19, 1861.
 

53rd Regiment Infantry

Organized March 11, 1864, from 3rd Mississippi Infantry (African Descent). Attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, United States Colored Troops, District of Vicksburg, Miss., to October, 1864. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Corps, to November, 1864. Dept. of Arkansas to February, 1865. District of Vicksburg, Miss., and Dept. of Mississippi to March, 1866.

SERVICE.--Post and garrison duty at Haines Bluff, District of Vicksburg, Miss., until October, 1864. Expedition to Grand Gulf March 12-14. Action at Grand Gulf July 16. Moved to St. Charles, Ark., on White River October, 1864, and duty there until February, 1865. Action on White River, near St. Charles, October 22, 1864. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., February, 1865, and duty there; at Macon, Meridian and other points in the Dept. of Mississippi until March, 1866. Mustered out March 8, 1866.


Captain John J. Carran - 46 Ohio Infantry - WIA - CDV

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A nice, clean image of Captain Joohn J. Carran of Company F, 46th Ohio Infantry.  Carran enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant in December 1861 and was discharged for disability on May 2, 1864.  Carran was promoted to Captain in September 1862 and was wounded at Shiloh on April 6, 1862.  The image is period ink signed "Jno J Carran, Class of 64 - April 13, 1864".  The backmark is "J.F. Ryder, Phootgraphist, 171 SuperiorStr. - Cleveland, O.".
 
46th Regiment Infantry. Organized at Worthington, Ohio, October 16, 1861, to January 28, 1862. At Camp Chase, Ohio, till February 18, 1862. Ordered to Paducah, Ky., February 18. Attached to District of Paducah, Ky., to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, Army of the Tennessee, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, Army Tennessee, to July, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, District of Memphis, Tenn., to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, Right Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, District of Memphis, Tenn., 13th Army Corps, to December, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 17th Army Corps, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 16th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division. 15th Army Corps, to July, 1865.
SERVICE.--Moved to Savannah, Tenn., March 6-10, 1862. Expedition to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Duty at Pittsburg Landing till April 27. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. March to Memphis, Tenn., via La-Grange, Grand Junction and Holly Springs June 1-July 2. Guard duty along Memphis & Charleston Railroad and provost duty at Memphis, Tenn., till November. Affair at Randolph September 25. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central Railroad November, 1862, to January 10, 1863. Guard duty along Memphis & Charleston Railroad, and scout duty in Northern Mississippi till June 8. Ordered to Vicksburg, Miss., June 8. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., June 11-July 4. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 4-10. Bolton's Ferry July 4-6. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Camp at Big Black till September 25. Moved to Memphis, thence march to Chattanooga, Tenn., September 25-November 20. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Paint Rock, Ala., November 20. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hill November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Pursuit to Graysville November 26-27. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 8. Duty at Scottsboro, Ala., December 31, 1863, to May 1, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Near Resaca May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on line of-Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Ezra Chapel, Hood's 2nd Sortie, July 28. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. Rome October 17. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Griswoldsville November 22. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Reconnoissance to Salkehatchie River, S.C., January 25. Salkehatchie Swamp February 2-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Congaree and Savannah Creeks February 15. Columbia February 16-17. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20-21. Mill Creek March 22. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June, and duty there till July. Mustered out July 22, 1865. Regiment lost during service 10 Officers and 124 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 7 Officers and 149 Enlisted men by disease. Total 290.

Captain John S. Foster - 4 Independent Ohio Cavalry - CDV

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A nice image of Captain John S. Foster of 4th Independent Ohio Cavalry.  Foster was commisioned in July 1861 and mustered out in July 1864.  Written in period ink on the front of the carte is "John S. Foster - Captain 4th Ind. O.C. - Georgetown, Ohio".  There is no backmark.
 
4th Independent Cavalry Company. Organized at Georgetown, Ohio, July 9, 1861. Moved to Camp Chase, Ohio, July 10, thence to St. Louis, Mo., August 19-21. Provost duty there till September, and at Syracuse, Mo., till October. Attached to Gen. Pope's Command, Army of the West. Fremont's advance on Springfield, Mo., October 21-November 7. Scouting and skirmishing in Western and Northern Missouri till February, 1862. Skirmish at Roan's Tan Yard, Silver Creek, January 8. 1862. Moved to Benton Barracks, Mo., February, 1862; thence to St. Louis, and duty at Headquarters of Gen. Halleck till April 9. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., as escort to Gen. Halleck, and duty at Dept. Headquarters till August. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Scout duty in Western Tennessee, attached to the Commands of Gen. McClernand, Logan and Lawler, till November. Actions at Bolivar, Tenn., August 22; Greenville August 23; Bolivar August 25; Britton's Lane, near Denmark September 1. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November- December. Assigned to duty as escort to Gen. J. B. McPherson, Commanding 17th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, December, 1862, to April, 1864, and as escort to Gen. McPherson, Commanding Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1864, then as escort to Headquarters 17th Army Corps to May, 1865, participating in the movement to Young's Point and Milliken's Bend, La., and operations against Vicksburg, Miss., February to July, 1863. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battles of Port Gibson May 1; North Fork, Bayou Pierrie, May 3; Willow Springs May 3; Utica May 9-10; Raymond May 12; Jackson May 14; Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg May 18-July 4. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2, 1864. Champion's Hill February 4. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Battle of Resaca. Battles about Dallas May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Battle of Atlanta July 22, Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Mt. Elon, S.C., February 27. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro and Raleigh. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Old members mustered out July 16, 1864. Company mustered out May 28, 1865. Company lost during service 5 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 16 Enlisted men by disease. Total 21.

James O. Archer - 7 Ohio Light Artillery - CDV

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A wonderful image of Corporal James O. Archer in a full standing pose.  Archer mustered into the 7th Ohio Light Artillery in January 1862.  He died of disease on August 4, 1863 at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  There is no backmark and the image is pencil signed "James O. Archer - 7 O.V.A. ".
 

Organized at Camp Dennison, Ohio, and mustered in January 1, 1862. Moved to St. Louis, Mo., March 18; thence to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 6. Attached to 6th Division, Army of the Tennessee, to June, 1862. Artillery, 4th Division, Army of the Tennessee and District of Memphis, Tenn., to September, 1862. Artillery, 4th Division, District of Jackson, Tenn., to November, 1862. Artillery, 4th Division, Right Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. Artillery, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, to January, 1863. Artillery, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Artillery, 4th Division, 13th Army Corps, to August. 1863. Artillery, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, to April, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, 17th Army Corps, to September, 1864. Artillery, Post of Vicksburg, Miss., District of Vicksburg, Miss., to November, 1864. Artillery Reserve, District of Vicksburg, Miss., to August, 1865.

SERVICE.--Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30, 1862. March to Memphis, Tenn., via Grand Junction, Lagrange and Holly Springs June 1-July 21. At Memphis until September 6. March to Bolivar, Tenn., September 6-16. Battle of Hatchie River, Metamora, October 5. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November-December. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., and duty there until May, 1863. Ordered to Vicksburg, Miss., May 13. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Assault on Jackson July 12. Ordered to Natchez, Miss., August 12, and duty there until November 11. Expedition to Harrisonburg, La., September 1-8. Moved to Vicksburg November 11 and camp at Big Black until February, 1864. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. Champion's Hill February 4. Duty at Vicksburg until May. Expedition to Yazoo City May 4-22. Benton May 7 and 9. Duty at Vicksburg until January 3, 1865. At Jackson and Hazelhurst as Infantry until July. Mustered out August 11, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Enlisted man killed and 1 Officer and 31 Enlisted men by disease. Total 33.


Solomon P. Becker - 17 Ohio Light Artillery - CDV

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A great standing photograph of Solomon P. Becker of the 17th Ohio Light Artillery.  Becker mustered into the 17th Ohio Light Artillery in August 1862 and mustered out in August 1865.  The backmark on the image is "Washburn, Photographer, 113 Canal St., New Orleans.".  The image is pencil signed.
 
Seventeenth Independent Battery Light Artillery. — Capts., Ambrose A. Blount, Charles S. Rice ; First Lieuts., George A. Ege, William Hunt, Jr., Absalom H. Mattox; Second Lieuts., Jeremiah Yeazel, William C. Howard, Abner Tuttle, Frank H. Houghton, Saul R. Strayer. This battery was mustered into service on Aug. 21, 1862, at Dayton, to serve for three years. It entered the field in September, taking a position in the rear of Covington, Ky., near Fort Wallace, to assist in repelling an expected attack from the Confederates under Gen. Kirby Smith. It was sent to Memphis in December and along with the forces of Gen. Burbridge aided in the destruction of the O. & S. railroad, and was present at the five days' fight at Chickasaw bayou and bluffs. It marched with Gen. McClernand's forces against Arkansas Post, and after the capture of that place encamped with the troops of the expedition at Young's point. In March the battery went into camp at Milliken's bend ; in April moved with the 13th corps on the campaign against Vicksburg; was engaged in the battles of Port Gibson, Champion's hill, Black river, and was 47 days in the siege of Vicksburg. In the demonstration against Jackson immediately after the fall of Vicksburg the battery was again actively engaged and performed valuable service in the reduction and capture of that place. It followed Gen. Burbridge on the Teche expedition in the fall of 1863, and was hotly engaged in the fight at Grand Coteau, La., in which more than half the brigade was killed, wounded and captured. The battery alone lost 25 men, 21 horses, 1 gun and 1 caisson. It remained at New Orleans until ordered to join the 16th corps in the spring of 1865 in the expedition against the city of Mobile. It was mustered out on Aug. 16, 1865, at Camp Chase, Ohio. The battery entered the service with 156 men, and at its muster-out its rolls showed 158, there having been from time to time 284 names added to its rolls. It lost 40 or more by death.

Lieutenant Thomas V. Coddingham - 54 Ohio Infantry & 52 USCT - CDV

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A nice bust photograph of 2nd Lieutenant Thomas V. Coddingham of Company C, 54th Ohio Infnatry and 52nd United States Colored Troops.  He enlisted in September, 1861 into Company C of the 54th Ohio Infantry as a corporal.  He served with the 54th Ohio until August 1863.  He wa discharged for promotion.  He was commisioned into Company F of the 52nd United States Colored Troops Infantry as 2nd Lieutenant.  He was mustered out in January 1865.  This image has a "D.P. Barr, Army Photographer, Palace of Art, Vicksburg, Miss." backmark.  Written in period ink on the front of the carte is "Truly Yours, Thos V. Coddingham, LT 52 U.S.C. Infantry".
 
 54th Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Dennison, Ohio, October, 1861. Left State for Paducah, Ky., February 17, 1862. Attached to District of Paducah, Ky., to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, Army of the Tennessee, to May, 1862. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1862. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, District of Memphis, Tenn., to November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, District of Memphis, Tenn., Right Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Right Wing 13th Army Corps, to December, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Sherman's Yazoo Expedition, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1865. Dept. of Arkansas to August, 1865.
SERVICE.--Moved from Paducah, Ky., to Savannah, Tenn., March 6-12, 1862. Expedition to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Russell's House, near Corinth, May 17. March to Memphis, Tenn., via LaGrange, Grand Junction and Holly Springs, June 1-July 21. Duty at Memphis till November. Expedition from Memphis to Coldwater and Hermando, Miss., September 8-13. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign, "Tallahatchie March," November 26-December 13. Sherman's Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Chickasaw Bayou December 26-28, 1862. Chickasaw Bluff December 29. Expedition to Arkansas Post, Ark., January 3-10, 1863. Assault and capture of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, January 10-11. Moved to Young's Point, La., January 17-21, and duty there till March. Expedition up Rolling Fork via Muddy, Steele's and Black Bayous and Deer Creek, March 14-27. Demonstrations on Haines and Drumgould's Bluffs April 29-May 2. Moved to join army in rear of Vicksburg, Miss., May 2-14, via Richmond and Grand Gulf. Battle of Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 4-10. Siege of Jackson, Miss., July 10-17. Camp at Big Black till September 26. Moved to Memphis, Tenn.. thence march to Chattanooga, Tenn., September 26-November 21. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Bear Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hill November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Pursuit to Graysville November 26-27. March to relief of Knoxville November 28-December 8. March to Chattanooga, Tenn., thence to Bridgeport, Ala., Bellefonte, Ala., and Larkinsville, Ala., December 13-31. Duty at Larkinsville, Ala., to May 1, 1864. Expedition toward Rome, Ga., January 25-February 5. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstration on Resaca May 8-13. Near Resaca May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Movements on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Ezra Chapel, Hood's 2nd sortie, July 28. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama against Hood September 29-November 3. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Fort McAllister December 13. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Salkehatchie Swamps, S.C., February 2-5. Cannon's Bridge, South Edisto River, February 9. North Edisto River, February 11-13. Columbia February 16-17. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 2, thence to Little Rock, Ark., and duty there till August. Mustered out August 15, 1865. Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 83 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 143 Enlisted men by disease.
 

USCT52nd Regiment Infantry

Organized March 11, 1864, from 2nd Mississippi Infantry (African Descent). Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, United States Colored Troops, District of Vicksburg, Miss., to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Corps, to November, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, United States Colored Troops, District of Vicksburg, Miss., to February, 1865. Maltby's Brigade, District of Vicksburg, Miss., and Dept. of Mississippi, to May, 1866.

SERVICE.--Post and garrison duty at Vicksburg, Miss., until June, 1865. Action at Coleman's Plantation, Port Gibson, July 4, 1864. Bayou Liddell October 15. Duty at various points in the Depts. of Mississippi and the Gulf until May, 1866. Mustered out May 5, 1866.


Colonel Harry Gilmor - 12 Viginia Cavalry, 1 & 2 Maryland Cavalry, Partisan Cavalry - CDV

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A great full standing photograph of Colonel Harry Gilmor.  He is armed andis wearing his full uniform.  Written underneath his photograph in period ink is "Harry Gilmor".  The backmark is "E.& H.T, Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York from Photographic Negative in BRADY'S National Portrait Gallery".
 
Harry Gilmor was born January 24, 1838 at "Glen Ellen", the family estate in Baltimore County, Maryland. After homesteading in Wisconsin and Nebraska, he returned to Maryland in time to join the newly formed Baltimore County Horse Guards as a corporal.
After the efforts of the citizens of Baltimore to prevent the movement of Federal troops through the city, the Horse Guards received orders to burn several bridges north of the city to prevent further troop movements toward Washington City.
Following the occupation of Baltimore by Federal troops under Brigadier General Benjamin "Beast" Butler, Gilmor was one of many to be arrested and imprisoned in Fort McHenry. After his release, he traveled South and joined the command of Colonel Turner Ashby on August 31, 1861.
In March 1862, he was commissioned Captain of Company F, Twelfth Virginia Cavalry. Captain Gilmor served throughout the Valley Campaign. At times, he was on special assignment to General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.
He was arrested during the Sharpsburg Campaign, while in the Baltimore area visiting family. He spent five months in prison.
He participated in the Battle of Brandy Station and was sighted in the after action reports of General Fitzhugh Lee and General J.E.B. Stuart for his conduct in this engagement.
On May 27, 1863, he was promoted to the rank of Major and asked to raise an independent battalion of cavalry. Before he could complete this assignment, the Gettysburg campaign interceded. During the battle, Major Gilmor was assigned command of the First and Second Maryland Cavalry, under General George Steuart's infantry brigade. Major Gilmor was the Provost Marshal of the town of Gettysburg while it was occupied.

Gilmor had organized six companies of partisan rangers by September of 1863. His command's area of operation was the Shenandoah Valley and parts of "West" Virginia. General J.E.B. Stuart ordered Gilmor to attack the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in February of 1864.

After the defeat of Major General Lew Wallace at Monocacy on July 9, 1864, Gilmor's command acted as the spearhead for the raid around Baltimore in 1864 with General Bradley T. Johnson's infantry command.

While assigned to scout duty under General Jubal Early, Colonel Gilmor single-handedly captured a company of Federal infantry. Gilmor and Holmes Conrad, a man under his command, later captured more than 50 troopers from the First New Jersey Cavalry.

Colonel Gilmor was ordered by General Early to take his command to Hardy County, West Virginia. He was to combine with other partisans in the area and attack the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Colonel Gilmor was finally captured in Hardy County, on February 4, 1865. He remained a prisoner at Fort Warren until July 24, 1865.

For several years after the war, Harry Gilmor lived in New Orleans, where he married Miss Mentoria Strong. Upon his return to Maryland, he was elected colonel of cavalry in the Maryland National Guard. He also served as Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1874 to 1879. He was a member of the Society of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States in Maryland and it's Vice-President in 1882.

Harry Gilmor died in Baltimore on March 4, 1883 at the age of forty-five. He was interred on "Confederate Hill" in Loudon Park Cemetery. To this day, people gather at his graveside on the anniversary of his birth to honor his life long service to his country.

From the website of Colonel Harry W. Gilmore Camp, #1388, Sons of Confederate Veterans

General Roger Hanson, Orphan Brigade Commander, CDV

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A great Confederate general CDV of General Roger Hanson. A Kentucky general who commanded the Kentucky brigade of John C. Breckinridge's division, which he lead at the battle of Stone's River. Hanson was mortally wounded on January 2, 1863, and died two days later in a house near the battlefield. He is buried in Lexington, KY. A wonderful full standing photograph.  The backmark is E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York.
 
Brigadier-General Roger W. Hanson was one of those gallant Kentuckians who, believing that the cause of the South was the cause of constitutional liberty, and fearing that the centralizing tendencies of the republican party would lead to the complete overthrow of the sovereignty of the States, left home and friends and, becoming an exile from his native State, threw his whole heart and soul into the struggle of the South for separate independence. His natural ability as a leader of men brought him to the front and he became colonel of the Second Kentucky infantry, commissioned September 3, 1861. His regiment was assigned to the Confederate army in central Kentucky, first under command of General Buckner. In the battle of Fort Donelson, amid a pitiless tempest of rain, snow and sleet and the more dreadful storm of shot and shell, Hanson and his men were distinguished for bravery and steady fighting, and are frequently mentioned in the official reports. It was late in the year when Colonel Hanson was exchanged. On the 13th of December, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general in the provisional army of the Confederate States. On the 3ist of the same month came the tremendous battle of Murfreesboro, in which Hanson commanded the Kentucky brigade of Breckinridge's division. On the ad of January Bragg noticed that Beatty's Federal brigade east of Stone's river enfiladed Polk's line in its new position. Bragg ordered Breckinridge to take his division and dislodge these troops. Lieut.-Col. S. C. Kniffin, of the staff of the Union General Crittenden, says: "In the assault that followed a brief cannonade, Hanson's left was thrown forward close to the river bank, with orders to fire once, then charge with the bayonet. On the right of Beatty was Col. S. W. Price's brigade, and the charge made by Hanson's Sixth Kentucky was met by Price's Eighth Kentucky regiment, followed by Hanson and Pillow in successive strokes from right to left of Beatty's lines. * * * Beatty ordered retreat, and assailants and assailed moved in a mass toward the river. * * * Crittenden, turning to his chief of artillery, said, 'Mendenhall, you must cover my men with your guns.' Never was there a more effective response to such a request. * * * In all, 58 pieces of artillery played upon the enemy. Not less than 100 shots per minute were fired. As the men swarmed down the slope they were mowed down by the score. Confederates were pinioned to the earth by falling branches. For a few minutes the brave fellows held their ground, hoping to advance, but the bank bristled with bayonets. Hanson was mortally wounded and his brigade lost 400 men." General Breckinridge in his official report says: "I cannot enumerate all the brave officers who fell, nor the living who nobly did their duty; yet I may be permitted to lament, in common with the army, the premature death of General Hanson, who received a mortal wound at the moment the enemy began to give way. Endeared to his friends by his private virtues and to his command by the vigilance with which he guarded its interest and honor, he was, by the universal testimony of his military associates, one of the finest officers that adorned the service of the Confederate States."

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