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Photographs
Commodore George N. Hollins CDV

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A nice image of Confederate Commodore George N. Hollins.  The backmark on the image is "Sold By Lawrence & Houseworth, Opticians, 637 Clay Street, San Francisco - Published by E.&H.T. Anthony, No. 501 Broadway, New York, Manufacturers of the Best Photographic Albumns.".
 
Commodore George Nichols Hollins was born at Baltimore, September 20, 1799. He entered the navy of the United States as midshipman in 1814, served on the Erie in her attempt to break the British blockade of Chesapeake bay, and was subsequently transferred to the President, where he served under Stephen Decatur until captured at Bermuda, where he was held until peace was established. His career thus gallantly begun, continued to be a conspicuous one. In the Algerian war of 1815 he served under Decatur with such merit as to be presented a sword in recognition of his gallantry. Subsequently he was on duty upon the Guerriere, Columbus, Franklin, and Washington, and commanded an East India merchantman for a time. He was promoted lieutenant in 1828, commander in 1841, and captain U. S. N. in 1855. In the latter year he bombarded Graytown in the interests of American residents. In 1861 Captain Hollins resigned his commission, upon which the war department refused to accept the resignation and ordered his arrest. But he eluded the effort made to this end, and in March, 1861, was at Montgomery, then the Confederate capital, where he met Semmes, Tattnall, Brent, and many other naval officers, for consultation with the committees of the Confederate Congress on the means to provide a navy for the new government. Hollins became a commander in the navy of the Confederate States, was assigned to very important duties, and quickly attracted attention by his clever capture, on June 29, 1861, of the steamer St. Nicholas in the Potomac river. On July 10th the naval defenses of the James river were placed under his command, and on July 31st he was put in charge of the naval station at New Orleans, where he defeated the Federal blockading squadron in the following October. Being appointed flagofficer, in December he took a fleet up the Mississippi river to assist in the defense of the works at Columbus, Ky. In April, 1862, he was called back to New Orleans by the appearance of the enemy in force, but before the fall of the city he was appointed to the court of inquiry on the destruction of the Virginia. After the war he resided at Baltimore, and died there January 18, 1878.

Major General John Sedgwick - 1st U.S. Cavalry - KIA - CDV

A nice image of Major General John Sedgwick, one of the most beloved soldiers in the Army of the Potomac.  He graduated West Point in 1837 and served against the Seminoes and Cherokee Indians.  He served under both Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott in the Mexican War and won brevets of captain and major.  He was major of the 1st U.S. Cavalry and was promoted colonel on the defection to the Confederacy of R.E. Lee and William J. Hardee.  He was commisioned brigadier general on August 31, 1861.  He fought on the Peninsula until he was wounded at Frayser's Farm in June 1862.  He was promoted major general in July 1862.  He was wounded three times at Sharpsburg and was carried from the field.  After his recovery he commanded the VI corps.  He commanded at Chancellorsville,Gettysburg, and the Wilderness.  At Spottsylvania he exposed himself to enemy fire and his aides cautioned him.  His reply, "they couldn't hit an elephant at this distance," was soon followed by the whistle and thump of a sharpshooters bullet which struck him below the left eye and killed him almost instantly. 
 
This great image of General Sedgwick has him seated wearing his major general's uniform.  The backmark on this image is "E.&H.T. Anthony, New York".

Lt. George Montgomery Fleming - 137 PA Infantry, 21 PA Cavalry, 11 US Infantry - CDV

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A very nice clean image of Lieutenant George Montgomery Flming of the 137th Pennsylvania Infanty, the 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry, and the 11th United States Infantry.  In August 1862, Fleming mustered into the 137th Pennsylvania Infnatry as a private.  He mustered out in june 1863.  In August 1863 he mustered into Company E, 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry as a private and by January 1864 was quartermaster sergeant.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in March 1864.  He served with the 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry until July 1865.  He had subsequent service with the 11th United States Regular Army as an officer.  This image is of Fleming when he was serving in the 11th US infantry.  The backmark is "C.R. Rees & Co., Richmond, Virginia, 1868".  Fleming signed his signature on the reverse of the image in period ink.  Written on the back of the image is "G.M. Fleming - 1st Lieut - 11th US'. 
 

137th Infantry Regiment
Pennsylvania Volunteers

Company A, of this regiment, was recruited principally in Wayne County,
Company B, in Crawford County,
Companies C, E, and H, in Clinton County,
Companies D, F, and G, in Butler County,
Company I, in Bradford County, and Company K, in Schuylkill County.

The men rendezvoused by squads and companies, at Camp Curtin, and on the 25th of August, 1862, a regimental organization was effected, by the choice of the following field officers:

  • Henry N. Bossert, of Clinton county, Colonel
  • Joseph B. Kiddoo, of Allegheny county, Lieutenant Colonel
  • Charles W. Wingard, of Clinton county, Major
With the exception of a small number of officers and men who had served in the militia, and in the three months' service, and Lieutenant Colonel Kiddoo, who had made the Peninsula campaign under M'Clellan, as a private, all were wanting in military experience.

Soon after its organization, the regiment was ordered to Washington, and upon its arrival, reported to General Casey. It went into camp near the city, and during its stay the companies were drilled by officers from the neighboring forts. On the 31st, it was assigned to General Hancock's Brigade, Smith's Division, Sixth Corps, then marching through Washington, after the defeat at Bull Run, and about to enter on the Maryland camnpaign.

South Mountain and Antietam

At Crampton's Gap, in the South Mountain, the corps came up with the enemy, and the regiment was here for the first time under fire, though not in the front line. The Pass was carried without its active participation, though the men were eager for the fray, and bore themselves, though almost entirely destitute of knowledge in military duty, with commendable coolness. After crossing the mountain, Colonel Bossert was ordered with a detachment from the different regiments of the brigade, to proceed in the direction of Harper's Ferry, and establish a line across the valley to guard against surprise from that direction. The rest of the regiment was assigned to the charge of the wagon train.

As the battle of Antietam opened, Colonel Bossert drew in his detachment and re-joined the brigade on the field. The Colonel, with Company I, was sent to the support of the brigade battery, and by his coolness under fire, won the thanks of the commander of the brigade. The main body of the regiment was held in reserve, and after the battle, assisted in burying the dead. It was then ordered to stay at Dam!No. 4, on the Potomac, where it was engaged in guard duty, and battalion drill.

When Stuart with his rebel cavalry made his raid into Pennsylvania, the brigade, then commanded by General Pratt, was sent in pursuit. The men were aroused at midnight and put upon the march, and no halt was called until they were far into Pennsylvania. The pursuit was fruitless, and the command went into camp a few miles from Hagerstown, near the State line.

Near the close of October, when the army returned into Virginia, the regiment was ordered to the defenses of Washington, and was encamped to the south of the east branch of the Potomac, with other new regiments. An excellent opportunity was here given for drill and dissipline, which, was studiously improved.

When the army reached Fredericksburg, under command of General Burnside, the regiment was again ordered to the field, and marching down to a point opposite, Acquia Creek, crossed the river. Here Colonel Bossert was placed in command of the post, with a brigade, composed of his own regiment. four regiments of New Jersey troops, and one friom New York, and was charged with guarding the landing, and the railroad leading to Fredericksburg.

The regiment remained on duty here, until Burnside opened his second campaign on the 20th of January, 1863, when it was ordered to the front, and assigned to the Third Brigade, First Division, First Army Corps, General Paul commanding the brigade, and Wadsworth the division.

Upon the abandonment of this campaign, it went into camp at Belle Plain, where it became well versed in drill and picket duty. On the 14th of March, Colonel Bossert was honorably discharged, and Lieutenant Colonel Kiddoo was promoted to succeed him, Major Wingard, to Lieutenant Colonel, and Captain Die Los Walker, to Major.

Chancellorsville

In the campaign under Hooker, which opened on the 27th of April, the regiment moved out with the corps, and crossing the RappahaInnock at Franklin's Crossing, under a heavy artillery fire, took position on the south bank, and built temporary earth-works. It remained in this position, under a violent fre of the enemy's artillery, until the night of the 1st of May, when the corps was ordered away to Chancellorsville, where the main body of the army was in position, and where the premonitions of hard fighting were strongly marked.

Accordingly, it re-crossed the river, marched to United States Ford, passed the stream, and after having just encamped for the night near its banks, was suddenly aroused and moved to the front, on the extreme right of the line, the Eleventh Corps having in the meantime been routed by the powerful army of Stonewall Jackson. The position of the brigade was on the right of the corps, and the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh on the right of the brigade. There was no serious fighting in its front, and three days after it returned with the army and occupied its former camp.

About the middle of May, the term of enlistment being about to expire, it was ordered to Harrisburg, where, on the 1st of June, it was finally mustered out of service.

Source: Bates, Samuel P. History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-65, Harrisburg, 1868-1871.

 

 

21st Cavalry / 182d Regiment

Pennsylvania Volunteers

The Twenty-first Cavalry was recruited during the months of July and August, 1863, by authority of Governor Curtin, under the President's call of June 15th, for cavalry for six months' service.

  • Company A was recruited in York county,
  • Company B in Adams County,
  • Companies C, and G in Lancaster County,
  • Companies D, I, I, K, L, and M in Franklin County,
  • Comapny E in Bedford County, and
  • Company F in Cambria County.
The companies were equipped and mounted at Camp Couch, near Harrisburg, and were thence sent to camp of instruction near Chambersburg. The following field officers were selected and commissioned:

  • William H. Boyd, Colonel
  • Richard F. Moson, Lieutenant Colonel
  • Charles F. Gillies, Major
  • Oliver B. Knowles, Major
  • John W. Jones, Major
The field officers were all experienced in cavalry duty. Colonel Boyd had commanded a company in the Lincoln Cavalry, which had attained distinction upon the Peninsula, and especially in skirmishing with the advance of Lee's army, in the Cumberland Valley, in the Gettysburg campaign. Lieutenant Colonel Moson had commanded a company in the Seventh Cavalry. Major Gillies was a regular army officer, and Major Knowles had served with great gallantry under--Captain Boyd--in-the Lincoln Cavalry. Most of the line officers and men had previously been in the service.

On the 23d of August, the regiment was ordered to Harrisburg, whence a detachment, consisting of companies C, E, K, H, L, and M, was sent for duty to Pottsville and Scranton, and company B to Gettysburg. The remaining five companies, under command of Colonel Boyd, proceeded to Harper's Ferry, and during the fall and winter, were engaged in arduous duty in the Department of the Shenandoah.

In January, 1864, authority was given to re-organize the regiment for three years service, and about the 1st of February, its scattered ranks were concentrated at camp near Chambersburg, where the troops who did not choose to re-enlist were mustered out of service; the remainder were mustered for the long term, and its depleted ranks were filled by new recruits, The field officers all remained, with the exception of Major Joties, whose place was filled by the promotion of Captain Robert Bell.

On the 1st of April, company D was ordered to duty at Scranton, Pennsylvania, where it remained for over a year. About the middle of May, the regiment was ordered to Washington, where, upon its arrival, it was dismounted, armed and equipped as infantry, and sent by transport to join the Army of the Potomac. It arrived at the front on the Ist of June, and was assigned to the Second Brigade, First Division, of the Fifth Corps, where it was associated with the Sixty-second Pennsylvania, and Twenty-second and Twenty-third Massachusetts, commanded by Colonel Sweitzer.

The army was then in front of Cold Harbor, and at noon of the 2d, the regiment was sent to the left of the Fifth Corps, where it was ordered to throw up breast-works. These were hardly completed, before the enemy opened upon it a flank fire from his artillery, from which Lieutenant Richard Waters was instantly killed. On the following morning, it was ordered a half-mile to the right, to the support of a battery, and at seven, the enemy brought his twenty-four pounders into play, killing two men and three horses belonging to the battery. The regiment was subsequently ordered to the front line,and in reaching it, was obliged to pass over a grain-field which was raked by the enemy's infantry and artillery fire. The charge across this was gallantly made, but with a loss of eight killed and nineteen wounded. A galling fire was kept up during the entire day from behind breast-works, and, notwithstanding it had this protection, it suffered considerable additional loss, the entire number being eleven killed and forty-six wounded. Colonel Boyd received a severe wound, on account of which he was subsequently discharged. Captain William H. Phillips, and Lieutenant Martin P. Doyle, were also among the wounded.

On the 18th of June, it was again engaged in front of Petersburg. "We were marched" says J. D. H., who has published a pamphlet of the "Travels and Doings" of the regiment, "over the field where the Second Corps had been engaged the day before, and the ground was covered with their dead. We came to a halt in a woods, where we were ordered to lie down. The rebels then commenced to shell us. We lost a great many men, killed and wounded. Among the latter was Major Gillies, of the First Battalion, wounded in the knee. We were ordered to go forward, and charged across a large field, and came to the Petersburg and Suffolk Railroad. Here we halted and kept up a brisk fire with the rebels, who were behind their works in front of us about half a mile. In the evening we were ordered to charge a large rebel fort. We fixed bayonets, and went up the hill on a yell, while the rebels opened upon us a perfect hail-storm of iron and lead from their muskets, and from sixteen pieces of artillery. If Cold Harbor was hard, the fight of the 18th of June was harder. We charged the brow of the second hill, and the rebel fort lay directly in front of us, at a distance of about one hundred and fifty yards. Here we found that we could go no farther. He who went beyond this, went to his grave. Four times were our colors shot down, and four times were they raised again. Finding that we could do no more, we halted and formed, and while some carried rails and built works, others kept up a heavy fire on the fort, which effectually silenced their artillery. After forming a line of works, we lay behind them, keeping up a fire with the rebels until morning, when we were relieved and taken to the rear."

In this engagement, the loss was eleven killed, seventy-nine wounded, and one missing. Lieutenant Colonel Moson, and Lieutenant Henry G. Lott, were among the severely wounded, the latter mortally. Major Gillies was incapacitated for further service, and was honorably discharged,and Lieutenant Colonel Moson was prevented from re-joining his command until near the time of its muster-out. The command of the regiment consequently devolved on Major Knowles

.On the 22d, the regiment was again engaged on the Jerusalem Plank Road, losing two killed and three wounded. Early in July, the Sixty-second Regiment was mustered out of service, by reason of expiration of its term, and the Ninety-first was assigned to the brigade, to the command of which Colonel E. M. Gregory succeeded. The regiment remained for some time in heavy works, near the Ninth Corps line, where it was subjected to a vigorous shelling. On the 30th of July, upon the occasion of the springing of the Mine, it was under fire, and sustained some loss, Captain John H. Harmony being wounded, but no advantage was gained, and the routine of duty behind the works was resumed.

On the 18th of August, a descent was made upon the Weldon Railroad, in which the Twenty-first participated, and was engaged in destroying the track, when the enemy attacked; but by the timely arrival of a portion of the Ninth Corps, he was repulsed, and the portion of the road possessed was held. The loss was one killed and twenty-seven wounded. Among thelatter was Lieutenant James Speer Orr, mortally.

Early in September, the Twenty-first was brigaded with the One Hundred and Eighty-seventh, Major Knowles commanding. About the middle of the month, upon the withdrawal of the One Hundred and Eighty-seventh from the front, the Twenty-first was transferred to the First Brigade, General Sickel in command, where it was associated with the One Hundred and Ninety-eighth. On the 30th, the brigade joined in the movement to the left, and at Poplar Spring Church came upon the enemy's works, which were triumphantly carried, with a loss in the Twenty-first of sixteen killed and wounded. On the following day, the regiment was attacked while lying upon the ground, in a large open field, but held its position without serious loss. For its gallantry in this engagement, it received a complimentary order from General Griffin, in command bf the division. With this battle closed the connection of the regiment with the infantry.

On the 5th of October, the Twenty-first was sent to City Point, where it was equipped and mounted, and ordered to the division of General D. M'M.Gregg, in which it was assigned to the First Brigade, composed of the First Maine, Sixth and Thirteenth Ohio, Second New York, and Twenty-first Pennsylvania, commanded by Colonel C. H. Smith. On the 27th of October, ther egiment was in a sharp engagement at the Boydton Plank Road, where the division went to the support of the Second Corps, which was hard pressed.The fighting was severe, and the Union forces were obliged to retire, the cavalry holding the line until the infantry and artillery were well out of the way, and then cutting its way out after night-fall. The Twenty-first lost three killed, thirty-three wounded, and eighteen missing. Captains Elias M'Mellen and George F. Cooke, and Lieutenants Martin P. Doyle, Henry C. Pearson, JohnT. Pfoutz, and Henry B. Kendig, were among the wounded, and Lieutenant William Chandler, among the prisoners.

On the 1st of December, the division proceeded to Stony Creek Station, destroying the station and rebel stores.The regiment was of the rear-guard on the return march, and sustained some loss. On the 4th, company E was detailed for duty at the headquarters of the Sixth Corps, with which it remained until near the close of its service. On the 6th the regiment was again out upon the Bellefield raid, and on the10th was engaged, losing two killed, five wounded, and one, Lieutenant John A. Devers, a prisoner. In the meantime, Major Knowles was promoted to Colonel, and Captain Richard Ryckman to Major.

On the 5th of February, 1865, a heavy force of the Union army moved across Hatcher's Run, for the purpose of opening the way to the left, and extending the lines towards the South Side Railroad. It was met by the enemy, and heavy fighting ensued, but the Union forces held their ground. Gregg's Cavalry co-operated, and moved on to Dinwiddie Court House, meeting some opposition, but having no serious fighting. Colonel Knowles had command of the brigade in this expedition.

During the winter, the Twenty-first was recruited to the full maximum strength, and on the 1st of March, was transferred to the Second Brigade, of the Second Division, which was composed of the Second, Fourth, Eighth, Sixteenth and Twenty-first Pennsylvania regiments, commanded by General J. Irvin Gregg. The dismounted men of the Twenty-first, comprising nearly half its entire strength, were ordered to City Point, under command of Captain James Mickley, and with the dismounted men of the brigade, participated, under command of Major Oldham, of the Eighth Pennsylvania, in the final assault upon the defenses of Petersburg.

"On the 29th of March," says Major Bell," the cavalry corps moved out on the left flank of the army, the Eighth Pennsylvania having the advance. By some mistake, this regiment mistook the road, which left the Twenty-first in advance, and gave it the honor of making the first charge in the campaign, striking the rebels near Dinwiddie Court House, carrying their barricades, and capturing some prisoners, from whom important information, pertaining to the rebel cavalry under Fitz Hugh Lee, was obtained. The Twenty-first was not in the fight of the 31st, which well nigh proved a disaster, it having been detailed to hold a bridge over Stony Creek. When it was discovered that the cavalry line was unable to hold its ground, Colonel Forsythe, of Sheridan's staff, ordered the Twenty-first to throw up a line of works across the road, in rear of the Court House, and said, with emphasis, "Thismust be held, at all hazards, until morning, when the Fifth Corps will be up"

Fortunately, the rebels did not follow their advantage, and the regiment was undisturbed during the night. The Second Brigade was only partially engaged at Five Forks, it being posted to prevent any flanking attacks on the left. On the 5th of April, the Second Division struck the rebel wagon train, and captured a battery, destroying two hundred wagons, and bringing in some nine hundred mules. The First Brigade made the captures, while the Second and Third did the most of the fighting. Out of two hundred and thirty-four engaged, the Twenty-first lost ninety-eight in killed, wounded, and missing, in less than half an hour. Adjutant Samuel Henry had two horses shot under him. On the next day, the Twenty-first was in the fight at Sailors' Creek, capturing a number of prisoners, with the loss of Lieutenant J. Henry Triece, killed, and a few men wounded. On the 7th, the brigade had a sharp, and in a measure disastrous fight, at Farmville, in which General Gregg was captured, and the regiment sustained some loss, mostly prisoners.

At daylight on the 9th, our brigade, under Colonel Young, of the Fourth, was thrown across the main road to Lynchburg, upon which the rebel army was retreating, and had some sharp work, contesting the ground in front, while Rosser's Cavalry hung upon its rear. Finally, the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth corps came up, and the division turned upon Rosser, who was driven nearly a mile, when he made a determined stand, and preparations were made to charge him in force. The Third Brigade had the centre, and the Twenty-first led on the main Lynchburg Road. At the sound of the bugle, the regiment dashed forward ,driving in the rebel skirmish line; but by the time his main force was reached, it was discovered that the regiment was entirely unsupported, and fearfully exposed to capture. A precipitate retreat was made, in which some prisoners were lost. On its way back, it was greeted with the glad tidings that Lee had surrendered, the other brigades having received the intelligence just as the Twenty-first went forward.

From Appomattox Court House, the brigade marched back to Burkesville, and shortly after to Petersburg. It had been but a few days in camp, when Sheridan moved with his entire cavalry corps for North Carolina, Upon his arrival at the Dan River, learning that General Johnston had surrendered, he turned back, and retired again to Petersburg. Early in May, the brigade was sent to Lynchburg, whence detachments were sent for provost duty to various points in the surrounding counties. Colonel Knowles, with a part of the Twenty-first, was sent to Danville, Virginia.

About the middle of June, the entire regiment, including detached companies and dismounted men, was concentrated at Lynchburg, and on the 8th of July, was mustered out of service. The active duty of the regiment really commenced on the 1st of June, 1864, at Cold Harbor, and virtually ended on the 9th of April, at Appomattox Court House, a period of a little over ten months. In that time it had three field officers severely wounded, one staff officer slightly wounded, one died of disease, and one was discharged to accept promotion in the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Regiment. Of the line officers, four were killed in battle or mortally wounded, ten were wounded, four were wounded previous to their promotions,and four were captured. Of the enlisted men, one hundred and forty-seven were killed in battle, or died of disease, and two hundred and fifty-three were wounded.

Organization

The original 21st Cavalry as organized at Harrisburg and Chambersburg June 28-August 1, 1863, for six months. Companies "C," "E," "H," "K," "L," "M," duty at Pottsville, Pa., and Scranton, Pa., and Company "B" at Gettysburg, Pa. Companies "A," "D," "F," "G" and "I" ordered to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., August 23, 1863. Attached to Cavalry Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. West Virginia, to February, 1864. Duty about Harper's Ferry, W. Va. Expedition from Charlestown to New Market November 15-18 (Detachment). Mount Jackson November 16. Wells' demonstration from Harper's Ferry December 10-21. Skirmish at Winchester January 3, 1864. Mustered out February 20, 1864. The 21st was organized as a 3-year unit at Harrisburg February, 1864. (Co. "D" detached April 1, 1864, and duty at Scranton, Pa., entire term.) Regiment moved to Washington, D. C., May 15, 1864, thence to Join Army Potomac in the field, arriving at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps, Army Potomac, to September, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Corps, to October, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry corps, Army Potomac, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, to July, 1865.

Service

Battles about Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-12, 1864.
Before Petersburg June 16-18.
Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865.
Weldon Railroad August 18-21.
Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2.
Sent to City Point October 5 and mounted.
Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28.
Warren's Expedition to Hicksford December 7-12.
Bellefield December 9-10.
Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865.
Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9.
Dinwiddie C. H. March 30-31.
Five Forks April 1.
Paine's Cross Road April 5.
Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox C. H. April 9.
Surrender of Lee and his army.
Expedition to Danville April 23-29.
Moved to Lynchburg, Va., and duty there and in Dept. of Virginia till July.
Mustered out July 8, 1865.

Losses

Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 80 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 116 Enlisted men by disease. Total 202.
Source: Bates, Samuel P. History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-65, Harrisburg, 1868-1871.



Captain David Van Buskirk - 27 Indianna Infanty - POW - Tallest Man in Union Army - CDV

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A nice full standing image of Captain David Van Buskirk of Company F ,27th Indiana Infantry.  Van Buskirk was commisioned 2nd Lieuteneat in August 1861.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in July 1862 and Captain in September 1862.  He was captured at Winchester on May 24, 1862 and was exchanged for Charles M. Harper, 8th Georgia Infantry on September 21, 1862.  He was considered the "Tallest" man in the Union Army measuring 6' 10 1/2 " tall and weighing approximately 300 pounds.  He resigned in April 1864.
 
Twenty-seventh Infantry INDIANA
(3 years)

Twenty-seventh Infantry.  Col., Silas Colgrove; Lieut.-Cols. 
Archibald T. Harrison, Abisha L. Morrison, John R. Fesler; 
Majs., John Mehringer, William S. Johnson, George W. Burge, 
Theodore F. Colgrove

This regiment was organized at Indianapolis in Aug. 1861, and 
was mustered in Sept. 12.  It left the state Sept. 15, for 
Washington City where it was transferred to Banks' Army of the 
Shenandoah in October.

It was in winter quarters near Frederick City, Md., and joined 
the movement in Shenandoah Valley in March, 1862, marching 
into Winchester on the 9th and after the battle of March 22-
23, joined in pursuit of Jackson's army.  It was in the 
battles of Front Royal and Winchester in May, holding back a 
vastly superior force for nearly 4 hours, after which it fell 
back with the army and engaged the enemy in the public 
streets.

It became part of Banks' division of Pope's Army of Virginia 
at Culpeper Court House and with that command participated in 
the battle of Cedar Mountain.  It then took part in the 
Maryland campaign and was actively engaged at Antietam, where 
it lost heavily.  It was then placed on picket duty, on the 
east bank of the Potomac, from Harper's Ferry to the mouth of 
Opequan creek, and during the winter moved to the vicinity of 
Fairfax Station, where it remained until spring.

It participated in the battle of Chancellorsville, losing 
heavily, and in pursuit of Lee's invading army marched with 
the 12th corps through Maryland into Pennsylvania, reaching 
Gettysburg in time to take a prominent part in that battle, 
and in the resistance to Pickett's charge on July 3, suffering 
heavy loss.

It then joined in the pursuit of the retreating army to the 
Potomac.  In September it was transferred to the West with the 
12th corps and was stationed at Tullahoma, Tenn., during the 
fall and winter.

A portion of the regiment reenlisted on Jan. 24, 1864, and 
after their return from furlough, it joined Sherman in 
Georgia, participating in the battle of Resaca, where, on an 
open field, it defeated the 32nd and 38th Ala., inflicting 
heavy loss and taking the battle flag, colonel and 100 
prisoners of the 38th.  Its own loss was 68 killed and 
wounded.

It participated in all the marching and skirmishing, battles and 
assaults of the army in the Atlanta campaign, moving to the city 
at its conclusion.  The non-veterans were mustered out Nov. 4, 
1864, the veterans and remaining recruits being transferred to 
the 70th regiment, and serving with it through the campaign to 
Savannah and up through the Carolinas.

On the muster-out of the regiment they were transferred to the 
33rd, with which they served until its muster out at 
Louisville, July 21, 1865.  The original strength was 1,052; 
gain by recruits, 116; reenlistments, 154; total, 1,322.  Loss 
by death, 275; desertion, 47; unaccounted for, 52.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3
 

1st Lieutenant Nelson S. Easton - 3 New Jersey Infantry - CDV

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A great image of 1st Lieutenant Nelson S. Easton of Company E & K of the 3rd New Jersey Infantry.  Easton was commisioned in the 3rd New Jersey Infantry in May 1861.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in December 1862 and 1st Lieutenant in August 1863.  He mustered out in June 1864. 
 
The image is a full standing image with Easton holding his kepi.  Written under the image is "Yours Truly, N.S. Easton" in period ink.  The backmark is "Broadbent & Co., 912 & 914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia".
 
NEW JERSEY
THIRD INFANTRY
(Three Years)
     Third Infantry.--Cols., George W. Taylor, Henry W. Brown; 
Lieut.-Cols., Mark W. Collett, James N. Duffy; Majs., James W. 
H. Stickney, William E. Bryan.  This regiment, raised under 
authority of General Orders No. 15 of May 4, 1861, was fully 
organized, equipped and officered by May 18, and on June 4 was 
duly mustered into the U. S. service for three years, at Camp 
Olden, Trenton.  It left the state on June 28, with a full 
complement of men--38 officers, 1,013 non-commissioned officers 
and privates, total, 1,051.  It was assigned to Gen. Kearny's 
brigade, with the 1st, 2nd and 4th N. J., composing the 1st New 
Jersey brigade.  Immediately after the first battle of Bull Run 
it joined the 1st and 2nd regiments near Alexandria, having 
been stationed at Fairfax during the engagement. It was among 
the first to come into direct collision with the pickets of the 
enemy and to suffer loss in its ranks from Confederate bullets 
at Munson's hill.  On March 9, 1862, the 2nd and 3d, with a 
squadron of the Lincoln cavalry, occupied Sangster's station, 
on the Orange & Alexandria railroad, the 4th acting as a 
support to the advance.  On the following day the brigade moved 
cautiously forward and at 10 o'clock in the morning entered the 
abandoned works at Manassas Junction--eight companies of the 3d 
being the first to take possession and hoist the regimental 
flag.  At West Point, Va., the brigade relieved the troops in 
advance on the evening of May 6, 1862, and the men lay on their 
arms in line of battle until daylight, when they were ordered 
forward, the 3d regiment being on the skirmish line.  At 
Gaines' mill the brigade was formed in two lines, the 3d and 
4th in front, and in that order advanced to the brow of a hill, 
where the 3d, under Lieut.-Col. Brown, was ordered into the 
woods to relieve Newton's brigade, which was sorely pressed by 
the enemy.  The gallant regiment stood its ground, opening a 
galling fire on the enemy and remaining in the woods until the 
close of the action, with a loss of 34 killed, 136 wounded and 
45 missing.  The regiment participated in the battles of 
Charles City cross-roads, Malvern hill, Manassas, Chantilly, 
Crampton's gap and Antietam, and also in the movement against 
Fredericksburg in December.  In the spring of 1863 the regiment 
took part in the movements of Hooker in the vicinity of 
Fredericksburg and fought at Salem church.  In the Gettysburg 
campaign the brigade, which prior to that movement had been in 
various apparently aimless marches in Virginia, was attached to 
Wright's division of the 6th corps.  Following the Gettysburg 
fight the regiment was engaged at Fairfield, Pa., Williamsport 
and Funkstown, Md., Rappahannock Station and Mine Run, Va.  
Col. Torbert being assigned to the command of a cavalry 
division, Col. Brown, of the 3d, temporarily took charge of the 
brigade, to which the 10th regiment was added before the grand 
advance under Grant.  In all the operations in the Wilderness 
the Jerseymen behaved with the greatest steadiness.  At the 
opening of the fight at Spottsylvania, after some playing at 
cross-purposes, the 3d and 15th regiments were advanced, the 
former under Capt. Dubois deployed as skirmishers, and the 
latter under Col. Campbell acting as a support.  On May 12, the 
brigade was massed for a charge--the 3d being in the second 
line-and pushed forward through the woods until within 100 
yards of the Confederate works.  In the first eleven days of 
Grant's campaign against Richmond the 3d regiment sustained the 
following losses: Killed 21, wounded 102, missing 33.  After 
fighting at the North Anna river, Hanover Court House, 
Totopotomoy creek and Cold Harbor, the 3d left the front on 
June 3 and reached the New Jersey state capital on the night of 
the 7th.  The men of the regiment who had reenlisted and those 
whose terms had not expired were at first transferred to the 
4th and 15th, but were subsequently consolidated into the 1st, 
2nd and 3d battalions, and with the 4th, 10th and 15th 
regiments, from that time forward until Feb., 1865, constituted 
the 1st brigade--the 40th regiment being added at the latter 
date.  The regiment then participated in the final operations 
of the war until the surrender of Lee, when it was assigned to 
what was known as the provisional corps, Army of the Potomac, 
and was mustered out at Hall's hill, Va., June 29, 1865.  The 
total strength of the regiment was 1,275 and it lost, by 
resignation 23, by discharge 383, by promotion 84, by transfer 
95, by death 213, by desertion 111,  by dismissal 4, not 
accounted for 3, leaving 359 that were mustered out.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Captain Francis W. Butler - 5 New Hampshire Infantry - WIA - CDV

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A nice image of Captain Francis W. Butler of Company K, 5th New Hampshire Infantry.  Butler was commisioned in the 5th New Hampshire Infantry in October 1861.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in June 1862 and Captain in December 1862.  Butler was wounded in June 1864 at Petersburg, Virginia and died of his wounds a month later on July 30, 1864.  The backmark on this image is "Carte de Visite, by E.R. Noyes, (Successor to J. Morgan,) Main Street, opp. Phenix Hotel, Concord, N.H.".  Written on the back of the image is "Capt. Butler" in period ink.

5th New Hampshire Regiment Infantry

Regimental History
Fifth Infantry. — Cols., Edward E. Cross, Charles E. Hapgood, Richard E. Cross (not mustered), Welcome A. Crafts (not mustered); Lieut.-Cols., Samuel G. Langley, Charles E. Hapgood, Richard E. Cross, James E. Larkin, Welcome A. Crafts; Majs., William W. Cook, Edward E. Sturtevant, Richard E. Cross, James E. Larkin, Welcome A. Crafts, Thomas L. Livermore, John S. Ricker (not mustered). The 5th, composed of men from all parts of the state, was mustered in at Concord Oct. 12 to 26, 1861, for three years' service. The original members, not reenlisted, were mustered out at Concord, Oct 29, 1864, the reenlisted men and recruits at Alexandria, Va., June 28, 1865. The 5th was made a battalion of eight companies, original members 1,002, recruits and transferred men 1,560, total strength 2,562. The number killed or died of wounds was 295 and other deaths numbered 176. The regiment left the state for Bladensburg, Md., Oct. 29, 1861, and became at once a part of the Army of the Potomac, wintering near Alexandria, Va. It built the famous "Grapevine bridge" across the Chickahominy and met its first severe losses at Fair Oaks, June 1, 1862; was engaged at Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White Oak swamp and Malvern hill; was in advance at Boonesboro and met with heavy losses at Antietam and Marye's heights, where its dead were found near the noted stone wall. Gen. Hancock reports their conduct as "heroic." The 5th soon won a reputation for hard fighting that caused it often to be assigned to some post of danger and it never failed to acquit itself with honor. A detail of picked troops supported the cavalry at Beverly ford and Brandy station, Va., and rejoined their regiment at Sangster's station. The 5th lost heavily at Gettysburg and on Aug. 1, 1863, was ordered home to recruit. With other New Hampshire regiments it was present at Cold Harbor, again losing many men. In the actions at Petersburg and at Deep Bottom, Gen. Hancock mentions them in orders for "Gallantry in capture of an enemy's battery." The regiment was relieved and moved to the rear about Nov. 15, 1864, and on Dec. 1 it was ordered to Fort Welch. It met with slight losses at Fort Stedman, was in actions at Dinwiddle Court House and Sailor's creek, Va., and fought their final battle at Farmville, Va., April 7, 1865. Few escaped death or capture, but on April 9 Lee surrendered and the remnant of the gallant 5th participated in the grand review of the Union army at Washington on May 23.
 

 
 

5th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment

The 5th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment lost 18 officers and 277 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 2 officers and 176 enlisted men to disease. This is the greatest loss sustained in battle of any regiment of infantry or cavalry in the Union Army during the Civil War. The regiment is honored by a monument at Gettysburg.

Monument to the 5th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg

1861

Organized at Concord, N. H.

October 22

Mustered in

October 29

Left State for Washington, D.C. In camp at Bladensburg, Defenses of Washington, D.C., attached to Howard's Brigade, Sumner's Division, Army of the Potomac

November 3-11

Expedition to Lower Maryland

November 27

At Camp California, near Alexandria, Va.

1862

January 17

Scout to Burke's Station (Company A)

March 10-15

Advance on Manassas, Va. attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac

March 20

Reconnaissance to Gainesville

March 28-29

To Rappahannock Station

March 28

Warrenton Junction

April 4

Moved to the Virginia Peninsula

April 5-May 4

Siege of Yorktown, Va.

May 28-30

Temporarily attached to Woodbury's Engineer Brigade to construct Grapevine Bridge over Chickahominy

May 31-June 1

Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines

June 25-July 1

Seven days before Richmond

June 28

Orchard Station

June 29

Peach Orchard, Allen's Farm and Savage Station

June 30

White Oak Swamp and Glendale

July 1

Malvern Hill

July-August

At Harrison's Landing

August 16-30

Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Alexandria and to Centreville, Va. to cover Pope's retreat from Bull Run

September-October

Maryland Campaign

September 14

Battle of South Mountain (Reserve)

September 15

Antietam Creek, near Keadysville

September 16-17

Battle of Antietam

September 21 - October 29

Duty at Harper's Ferry, W. Va.

October 16-17

Reconnaissance to Charlestown

October 29-November 17

Advance up Loudon Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va.

December 12-15

Battle of Fredericksburg

1863

January 20-24

Burnside's Second Campaign, "Mud March"

February-April

Duty at Falmouth

April 27-May 6

Chancellorsville Campaign

May 1-5

Battle of Chancellorsville

May

Colonel Cross takes command of the brigade, and Lieutenant Colonel Charles E. Hapgood takes command of the regiment

June 9

Reconnaissance to Rappahannock

June 13-July 24

Gettysburg Campaign

July 1-3

Battle of Gettysburg

When Colonel Cross was mortally wounded by a Confederate sharpshooter, Lt. Colonel Hapgood pointed out the man to Sergeant Charles Phelps, who dropped the hapless Rebel. Phelps, in turn, was himself mortally wounded.

From the monument: "Here July 2nd, 1863 from 5 p.m. till 7 the 5th N.H. Vols. stood and fought. Total engaged 182. Killed or mortally wounded 31. Total killed and wounded 81."

On this spot fell mortally wounded Edward C. Cross, Col. 5th N.H. Vols. Comdg. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Corps, July 2nd, 1863"

"Killed or mortally wounded: 2nd Lieut. Ruel G. Austin; Sergeants Oscar D. Allen, Samuel Dolbear, Charles H. Phelps, William B. Welch; Corporals Charles F. Burrell, Edwin B. Cilley, George H. Hackett, Warren M. Parker, George W. Sylvester, Edward G. F. Stinson, Joseph Tricky; Privates Byron Bennett, Horace Bolii, Joesph Bond Jr., George H. Bucknam, James Burns, Joseph Craig, Charles A. Damon, Lucius Feeney, Andrew J. Foss, Samuel R. Green, Charles Kimball, George Kimball, Charles A. Lovejoy, Nathan B. Osmer, Eliph. B. W. Stevens, Roland Taylor, Nathan B. Thompson, Otis Thompson"

"The State of New Hampshire erected this monument July 2nd, 1886 to commemorate the valor of her sons."

July 26-August 3

Moved to Concord, N.H., Dept. of the East for duty at Draft Rendezvous, Concord, N.H.

November 8-13

Moved to Point Lookout, Md. and duty there guarding prisoners. Attached to Marston's Command, Point Lookout, Md.

1864

May 27-June 1

Moved to Cold Harbor, Va., attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac

June 1-12

Battles about Cold Harbor

June 16-19

Before Petersburg, Va.; Siege of Petersburg begins

June 22-23

Jerusalem Plank Road

July 27-28

Deep Bottom, north of James River

July 30

Mine Explosion, Petersburg (Reserve)

August 13-20

Demonstration north of James River

August 14-18

Strawberry Plains

August 25

Ream's Station

October 12

Non-Veterans mustered out

December 9-10

Reconnaissance to Hatcher's Run

February 5-7

Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run

March 25

Watkins' House

March 28-April 9

Appomattox Campaign

March 29-30

On line of Hatcher's and Gravelly Runs

March 31

Hatcher's Run or Boydton Road and White Oak Road

April 2

Sutherland Station; Fall of Petersburg

April 6

Saylor's Creek

April 7

High Bridge and Farmville

April 9

Appomattox Court House. Surrender of Lee and his army.

May 2-12

Moved to Washington, D.C.

May 23

Grand Review

July 28

Mustered out

August 8

Discharged

Regimental history from A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, by Frederick Dyer:

Organized at Concord, N. H., and mustered in October 22, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., October 29, 1861. Attached to Howard's Brigade, Sumner's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1863. Concord, N.H., Dept. of the East, to November, 1863. Marston's Command, Point Lookout, Md., to May, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.--Camp at Bladensburg, Defenses of Washington, D.C., until November 27, 1861. Expedition to Lower Maryland November 3-11. At Camp California, near Alexandria, Va., until March 10, 1862. Scout to Burke's Station January 17, 1862 (Co. "A"). Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15. Reconnaissance to Gainesville March 20, and to Rappahannock Station March 28-29. Warrenton Junction March 28. Moved to the Virginia Peninsula April 4. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4. Temporarily attached to Woodbury's Engineer Brigade. Construct Grapevine Bridge over Chickahominy May 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Orchard Station June 28. Peach Orchard, Allen's Farm and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Alexandria and to Centreville, Va., August 16-30. Cover Pope's retreat from Bull Run. Maryland Campaign September-October. Battle of South Mountain, Md., September 14 (Reserve). Antietam Creek, near Keadysville, September 15. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17. Duty at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 21 to October 29. Reconnaissance to Charlestown October 16-17. Advance up Loudon Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 17. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Burnside's Second Campaign, "Mud March," January 20-24, 1863. Duty at Falmouth until April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Reconnaissance to Rappahannock June 9. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 13-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Moved to Concord, N.H., July 26-August 3. Duty at Draft Rendezvous, Concord, N.H., until November. Moved to Point Lookout, Md., November 8-13, and duty there guarding prisoners until May 27, 1864. Moved to Cold Harbor, Va., May 27-June 1, and join Army of the Potomac. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg, Va., June 16-19. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1865. Deep Bottom, north of James River, July 27-28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Demonstration north of James River August 13-20. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Non-Veterans mustered out October 12, 1864. Reconnaissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. On line of Hatcher's and Gravelly Runs March 29-30. Hatcher's Run or Boydton Road March 31. White Oak Road March 31. Sutherland Station April 2. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Saylor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D.C., May 2-12 Grand Review May 23. Mustered out July 28, and discharged July 8, 1865. This Regiment sustained the greatest loss in battle of any Infantry or Cavalry Regiment in the Union Army. Total killed and wounded 1,051.

Death losses during service 18 Officers and 277. Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 176 Enlisted men by disease. Total 473.

5th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment

The 5th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment lost 18 officers and 277 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 2 officers and 176 enlisted men to disease. This is the greatest loss sustained in battle of any regiment of infantry or cavalry in the Union Army during the Civil War. The regiment is honored by a monument at Gettysburg.

Monument to the 5th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg

1861

Organized at Concord, N. H.

October 22

Mustered in

October 29

Left State for Washington, D.C. In camp at Bladensburg, Defenses of Washington, D.C., attached to Howard's Brigade, Sumner's Division, Army of the Potomac

November 3-11

Expedition to Lower Maryland

November 27

At Camp California, near Alexandria, Va.

1862

January 17

Scout to Burke's Station (Company A)

March 10-15

Advance on Manassas, Va. attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac

March 20

Reconnaissance to Gainesville

March 28-29

To Rappahannock Station

March 28

Warrenton Junction

April 4

Moved to the Virginia Peninsula

April 5-May 4

Siege of Yorktown, Va.

May 28-30

Temporarily attached to Woodbury's Engineer Brigade to construct Grapevine Bridge over Chickahominy

May 31-June 1

Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines

June 25-July 1

Seven days before Richmond

June 28

Orchard Station

June 29

Peach Orchard, Allen's Farm and Savage Station

June 30

White Oak Swamp and Glendale

July 1

Malvern Hill

July-August

At Harrison's Landing

August 16-30

Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Alexandria and to Centreville, Va. to cover Pope's retreat from Bull Run

September-October

Maryland Campaign

September 14

Battle of South Mountain (Reserve)

September 15

Antietam Creek, near Keadysville

September 16-17

Battle of Antietam

September 21 - October 29

Duty at Harper's Ferry, W. Va.

October 16-17

Reconnaissance to Charlestown

October 29-November 17

Advance up Loudon Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va.

December 12-15

Battle of Fredericksburg

1863

January 20-24

Burnside's Second Campaign, "Mud March"

February-April

Duty at Falmouth

April 27-May 6

Chancellorsville Campaign

May 1-5

Battle of Chancellorsville

May

Colonel Cross takes command of the brigade, and Lieutenant Colonel Charles E. Hapgood takes command of the regiment

June 9

Reconnaissance to Rappahannock

June 13-July 24

Gettysburg Campaign

July 1-3

Battle of Gettysburg

When Colonel Cross was mortally wounded by a Confederate sharpshooter, Lt. Colonel Hapgood pointed out the man to Sergeant Charles Phelps, who dropped the hapless Rebel. Phelps, in turn, was himself mortally wounded.

From the monument: "Here July 2nd, 1863 from 5 p.m. till 7 the 5th N.H. Vols. stood and fought. Total engaged 182. Killed or mortally wounded 31. Total killed and wounded 81."

On this spot fell mortally wounded Edward C. Cross, Col. 5th N.H. Vols. Comdg. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Corps, July 2nd, 1863"

"Killed or mortally wounded: 2nd Lieut. Ruel G. Austin; Sergeants Oscar D. Allen, Samuel Dolbear, Charles H. Phelps, William B. Welch; Corporals Charles F. Burrell, Edwin B. Cilley, George H. Hackett, Warren M. Parker, George W. Sylvester, Edward G. F. Stinson, Joseph Tricky; Privates Byron Bennett, Horace Bolii, Joesph Bond Jr., George H. Bucknam, James Burns, Joseph Craig, Charles A. Damon, Lucius Feeney, Andrew J. Foss, Samuel R. Green, Charles Kimball, George Kimball, Charles A. Lovejoy, Nathan B. Osmer, Eliph. B. W. Stevens, Roland Taylor, Nathan B. Thompson, Otis Thompson"

"The State of New Hampshire erected this monument July 2nd, 1886 to commemorate the valor of her sons."

July 26-August 3

Moved to Concord, N.H., Dept. of the East for duty at Draft Rendezvous, Concord, N.H.

November 8-13

Moved to Point Lookout, Md. and duty there guarding prisoners. Attached to Marston's Command, Point Lookout, Md.

1864

May 27-June 1

Moved to Cold Harbor, Va., attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac

June 1-12

Battles about Cold Harbor

June 16-19

Before Petersburg, Va.; Siege of Petersburg begins

June 22-23

Jerusalem Plank Road

July 27-28

Deep Bottom, north of James River

July 30

Mine Explosion, Petersburg (Reserve)

August 13-20

Demonstration north of James River

August 14-18

Strawberry Plains

August 25

Ream's Station

October 12

Non-Veterans mustered out

December 9-10

Reconnaissance to Hatcher's Run

February 5-7

Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run

March 25

Watkins' House

March 28-April 9

Appomattox Campaign

March 29-30

On line of Hatcher's and Gravelly Runs

March 31

Hatcher's Run or Boydton Road and White Oak Road

April 2

Sutherland Station; Fall of Petersburg

April 6

Saylor's Creek

April 7

High Bridge and Farmville

April 9

Appomattox Court House. Surrender of Lee and his army.

May 2-12

Moved to Washington, D.C.

May 23

Grand Review

July 28

Mustered out

August 8

Discharged


Colonel John Kurtz - 23 Massachusetts Infantry - CDV

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A standing view of Colonel John Kurtz of the 23rd Massachusetts Infantry.  Kurtz origionally was commisioned in the 13th Massachusetts Infantry as a Captain in July 1861.  On September 28, 1861 he was commisioned Lt. Colonel in the 23rd Massachusetts Infantry and became their colonel on October 23, 1861.  He resigned November 25, 1862 due to "Dissatisfication relative to rank."  He was the police chief of Boston, Massachusetts from 1863 until 1870.  He is listed on page 102 of Roger Hunt's "Colonels in Blue - Union Army Colonels of the Civil War - The New England States; Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont".  The backmark on the image is "J.W.Black, 173 Washington St., Boston."

The 23rd Massachusetts Infantry Regiment

(Three Years)

Unit History

The 23d Regt. Mass. Vol. Inf. was composed of six companies from Essex County and one each from Bristol, Plymouth, Middlesex, and Worcester. Several were recruited by men who had service in three months organizations between April and July, 1861. The companies assembled at Lynnfield, Mass., in September, 1861, and many of the men were mustered in September 28, though some were not mustered until December 5, after their arrival at Annapolis, Md. John 'Kurtz, an old militia officer, was commissioned colonel of the regiment. On Nov. 11, 1861, it left the State for the seat of war. Arriving at Annapolis three days later, it there established Camp John A. Andrew, where it remained until January, 1862, when it was attached to the Burnside Expedition and embarked for the coast of North Carolina. It now formed a part of Foster's Brigade, Burnside's Coast Division. It was present with lose at Roanoke Island, Feb. 8, and suffered a much greater loss at Newbern, March 14, among the killed being Henry Merritt, lieutenant colonel of the regiment.

In May, 1862, three divisions were formed, and the 23d became a part of Amory's (1st) Brigade, Foster's (1st) Division. The regiment was stationed in or near Newbern, N. C., during the summer and fall of 1862, engaging in two or three skirmishes with small loss. On Dec. 10, it joined the Goldsboro expedition, being slightly engaged at Kinston, Dec. 14, and heavily engaged at Whitehall, the 16th, where it lost 16 in killed and mortally wounded. It continued on to Goldsboro, but was not in the action at that place.

From the middle of January to the middle of April the regiment was absent on an expedition toward Charleston, S. C., now forming a part of Heckman's Brigade. After its return in April it formed a part of an expedition sent to the relief of Little Washington, and in July was sent on another expedition to Trenton.

On October 16, 1863, it left Newbern en route to Fort Monroe, which place it reached October 19, and encamped near Newport News. Here in the early winter over 200 officers and men re-enlisted for three years. On Jany. 23, the regiment took steamer for Portsmouth and occupied fortifications about three miles outside the city. From here it made an expedition to Smithfield in April where on the 1 6th of the month it was engaged with loss. Gen. Heckman's command was now known as the Star Brigade - 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 18th Corps - and was ordered up the James to Bermuda Hundred. It was in action at Port Walthall Junction, May 6 and 7, and at Arrowfield Church, May 9. At Drewry's Bluff (also spelled Drurys Bluff), May 16, the Star Brigade was outflanked in the fog which enveloped the field, Gen. Heckman was taken prisoner, and the 23d lost 23 killed and mortally wounded, 20 wounded, and 51 prisoners. Among the fatally wounded was Lieut. Col. John G. Chambers.

Soon after Drewry's Bluff the 18th Corps was transferred to the north side of the James and joined the Army of the Potomac near Cold Harbor. Heckman's Brigade was here commanded by Gen. George J. Stannard. In the assault of June 3 the 23d Regt. lost 10 killed or mortally wounded, 39 wounded, and 2 missing. Recrossing to the Petersburg front the regiment remained before that city until August 25, suffering frequent losses from sharpshooters.

Crossing to the north side of the Appomattox and proceeding to Bermuda Hundred the regiment embarked, Sept. 4, for Newborn again and on the 10th of the month the men were again in the familiar trenches an the Trent River. In the latter part of September the men who had not re-enlisted were sent home to be mustered out. During the autumn and winter the yellow fever raged in Newborn and the regiment suffered severely from its ravages.

On March 8, 1865, at Wise's Forks near Kinston the regiment fought its last battle losing 3 killed and 10 wounded. It now remained near Kinston until May when it returned to Newborn where it acted as provost guard until June 25, when it was mustered out of the service. Returning to Massachusetts, on July 5, at Readville, the men received their pay and their final discharge.

Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 80 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 132 Enlisted men by disease. Total 218.


Captain Axel Leatz - 5 New York Veteran Infantry - WIA - POW - CDV

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A nice image of Captain Axel Leatz of the 5th New York Veteran Infantry.  Leatz enlisted on December 8, 1863 as a 2nd Lieutenant.  He was wounded and captured at Bethesda Church, Virginia on June 2, 1864.  He was paroled on December 6, 1864.  Leatz was promoted 1st Lieutenant on March 21, 1864 and Captain in April 1865. 
 
This image of Leatz is in his Royal Swedish Army uniform.  The backmark on this image is "Barcalow, 76 Bowery, N.Y.".  It is signed "Axel Leatz - 27th Inf. Royal Swedish Army".  A blue two cent "Playing Cards" stamp with George Washington is attached to the back of the image.  Leatz was many of the European soldiers that came and participated in the Civil War.
 
NEW YORK
FIFTH VETERAN INFANTRY

Fifth Veteran Infantry.-Col. Winslow received authority to 
reorganize the 5th for three years' service and with the recruits 
enlisted for the 31st and 37th veteran infantry, a battalion of 
four companies-the veteran 5th left New York Oct. 26, 1863, and 
was assigned to the defenses of Washington, where it remained 
until May 31, 1864.

It was then assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 5th corps, 
Army of the Potomac, and received at different times, the 
veterans and recruits of the 12th, 84th, 140th, 185th and 188th 
N.  Y.  The regiment participated in the battle of Cold Harbor; 
lost at Bethesda Church 87 killed, wounded and missing; proceeded 
with the 5th corps to Petersburg; was in an encounter at the 
Weldon railroad in August and lost 119 men; was also active at 
Poplar Spring Church, Hatcher's run, White Oak road, where the 
loss was 60 killed, wounded and missing; and shared in the final 
assault on Petersburg and the battle of Five Forks.

Routine duties were performed by the regiment for some weeks and 
on Aug. 21, 1865, it was mustered out at Hart's island, N. Y. 
Harbor.  The total strength of the 5th veteran regiment was 1,138 
and it lost by death from wounds 99 members, and 90 died from 
other causes.

Source:  The Union Army, Vol. 2, p. 53

Lt. Colonel Joshua S. Fletcher - 11 U.S. Regular Infantry - CDV

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A nice image of Lt. Colonel Joshua S. Fletcher of the 11th United States Regular Infantry.  Written below the image in period ink is "J.S. Fletcher - Bvt. Lt. Col. USA - Capt. 11th Infy".  The backmark on the image is "Anderson & Co. - 1311 Main St. - Richmond, VA.".  Fletcher was a Captain in March 1862.  He was breveted Major in August 1864, and breveted Lt. Colonel just 17 days later on August 18, 1864.  Fletcher was wounded at Weldon Railroad. 
 
 

The fourth[1][2] 11th Infantry was organized on May 4, 1861 by direction of the President.[8] On May 14, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln issued an executive order, directing an increase of the regimental organizations of the Regular Army. The 11th Infantry was the first, numerically, of the nine infantry regiments, of three battalions of eight companies each, were of the increase authorized. In G. O. No. 33, A. G. O., series of 1861, in contrast to the original ten regular regiments of infantry, which were organized on the traditional ten-company line. The 11th Infantry was organized at Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, as regimental headquarters, and which remained the 11th's headquarters during the War.[9] Erasmus D. Keyes was served as colonel of the 11th U.S. Infantry from 14 May 1861 to 6 May 1864.[1] William S. Ketchum served as colonel of the 11th U.S. Infantry 6 May 1864 to 15 March 1869.[1]

After six companies had been organized and assigned to the 1st Battalion, 11th Infantry Regiment, it was ordered to Perryville, Maryland, October 10, 1861, and duty there until March 1862. Ordered to Washington, D.C. Attached to Sykes' Regular Infantry, Reserve Brigade, Army Potomac, to May 1862. The 11th then campaigned September 1863 to November 1864 as part of the 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac and 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to January 1865.[8]

The 11th took part in the following: Peninsula Campaign, Siege of Yorktown, Battle of Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Turkey Bridge June 30, Battle of Malvern Hill Malvern Hill, At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Centerville August 16–28. Pope's Northern Virginia Campaign, Battle of Groveton August 29, Second Battle of Bull Run, Maryland Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Shepherdstown Ford September 19–20, Battle of Fredericksburg, "Mud March", Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6, Battle of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg Campaign, Battle of Gettysburg, Pursuit of Lee July 5–24. On special duty at New York August 21-September 14. Rejoined army, Bristoe Campaign, Second Battle of Rappahannock Station, Mine Run Campaign, Rapidan Campaign, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna River, Pamunkey May 26–28, Battle of Totopotomoy Creek, Battle of Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church June 1–3, Second Battle of Petersburg, Siege of Petersburg, Mine Explosion, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Poplar Springs Church, Peeble's Farm, Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run.[8]

Moved to Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, November 2, thence to Baltimore, Maryland., November 18, and to Annapolis, Maryland., December 5. Duty at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md., until January 26, 1865. Ordered to City Point, Virginia., January 26, and camp near Gen. Grant's Headquarters until March 8. Provost duty at Headquarters, Army Potomac, until May, and at Richmond. Va., until October, 1865.[8]

The regiment lost during the Civil War 8 Officers and 117 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 86 Enlisted men by disease. Total, 213.[8]

After the surrender, the 11th Infantry with other Regular troops, was sent to Richmond, Va., where it arrived May 3d. It did provost duty in Richmond until the civil government of the city was organized, and at Libby Prison until its use was discontinued. During the summer and fall of 1865 the twenty-four companies of the regiment were organized. In the summer of 1866, the regiment suffered a great mortality from cholera.[10]


Captain Richard Robins - 11 U.S. Regular Infantry - CDV

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A neat image of Captain Richard Robins of the 11th United States Infantry.  Robins mustered in as a private in October 1861.  He was promoted to corporal and then 2nd lieutenant.  On July 2, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg, he was promoted by brevet to 1st Lieutenat for Gallant service.  This promotion was confirmed on July 25, 1863.  He was promoted to Captain by brevet on March 13, 1865.  He stid in the army until July 1868.
 
This image was taken while Robins was on duty after the war in Richmond, Virginia.  The photo was taken by C.R. Rees & Bro. - Richmond, Va.  as noted on the front of the carte underneath the photo.  The backmark is "C.R. Rees & Bro. Photographic Artisits, 913 Main St., Bet 9th & 10th, Richmond, VA.".
 
Civil War

The fourth[1][2] 11th Infantry was organized on May 4, 1861 by direction of the President.[8] On May 14, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln issued an executive order, directing an increase of the regimental organizations of the Regular Army. The 11th Infantry was the first, numerically, of the nine infantry regiments, of three battalions of eight companies each, were of the increase authorized. In G. O. No. 33, A. G. O., series of 1861, in contrast to the original ten regular regiments of infantry, which were organized on the traditional ten-company line. The 11th Infantry was organized at Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, as regimental headquarters, and which remained the 11th's headquarters during the War.[9] Erasmus D. Keyes was served as colonel of the 11th U.S. Infantry from 14 May 1861 to 6 May 1864.[1] William S. Ketchum served as colonel of the 11th U.S. Infantry 6 May 1864 to 15 March 1869.[1]

After six companies had been organized and assigned to the 1st Battalion, 11th Infantry Regiment, it was ordered to Perryville, Maryland, October 10, 1861, and duty there until March 1862. Ordered to Washington, D.C. Attached to Sykes' Regular Infantry, Reserve Brigade, Army Potomac, to May 1862. The 11th then campaigned September 1863 to November 1864 as part of the 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac and 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to January 1865.[8]

The 11th took part in the following: Peninsula Campaign, Siege of Yorktown, Battle of Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Turkey Bridge June 30, Battle of Malvern Hill Malvern Hill, At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Centerville August 16–28. Pope's Northern Virginia Campaign, Battle of Groveton August 29, Second Battle of Bull Run, Maryland Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Shepherdstown Ford September 19–20, Battle of Fredericksburg, "Mud March", Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6, Battle of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg Campaign, Battle of Gettysburg, Pursuit of Lee July 5–24. On special duty at New York August 21-September 14. Rejoined army, Bristoe Campaign, Second Battle of Rappahannock Station, Mine Run Campaign, Rapidan Campaign, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna River, Pamunkey May 26–28, Battle of Totopotomoy Creek, Battle of Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church June 1–3, Second Battle of Petersburg, Siege of Petersburg, Mine Explosion, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Poplar Springs Church, Peeble's Farm, Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run.[8]

Moved to Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, November 2, thence to Baltimore, Maryland., November 18, and to Annapolis, Maryland., December 5. Duty at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md., until January 26, 1865. Ordered to City Point, Virginia., January 26, and camp near Gen. Grant's Headquarters until March 8. Provost duty at Headquarters, Army Potomac, until May, and at Richmond. Va., until October, 1865.[8]

The regiment lost during the Civil War 8 Officers and 117 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 86 Enlisted men by disease. Total, 213.[8]

After the surrender, the 11th Infantry with other Regular troops, was sent to Richmond, Va., where it arrived May 3d. It did provost duty in Richmond until the civil government of the city was organized, and at Libby Prison until its use was discontinued. During the summer and fall of 1865 the twenty-four companies of the regiment were organized. In the summer of 1866, the regiment suffered a great mortality from cholera.[10]


Major John M. Goodhue - 11 U.S. Regular Army - CDV

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A nice full standing image of Major John Milton Goodhue.  Goodhue is a Captain in this photo and he is holding his kepi which has an "11" in the infantry horn.  Goodhue was commisioned captain in the 11th US Infantry in May 1861.  He was promoted to major by brevet on March 13, 1865.  The Major lived in Worcester, Massachusetts.  He was wounded at Gettysburg and had his finger amputated.  I have included the Gettysburg after action report stating this.
 
Gettysburg after battle report:

  Report of Maj. De Lancey Floyd-Jones, Eleventh U. S. Infantry.

  Camp near Berlin, Md.,
  July 16, 1863.
  Capt.: In obedience to the circular from brigade headquarters,
  I have the honor to furnish in brief a report of the operations of the
  Eleventh U. S. Infantry at the battle of Gettysburg, on the 2d instant.

  In company with the other battalions of the brigade, we moved
  about 5 p. m. from our resting place, nearly opposite the center of the
  army, to near the Sugar Loaf or Round Top Mountain, a point near
  the left of the line.

  Immediately upon reaching this, we were ordered to advance in
  line of battle, passing from the shelter of a wood across an open field,
  through which ran a heavy morass.  We advanced in good order,
  although exposed to a flank fire from the enemy, and halted immediately
  in front of a piece of woods, where we lay some half hour
  or more.  Our brigade then relieved some troops of the Second
  Corps, for which purpose we advanced into the woods, at the same
  time changing our direction by a wheel to the left.

  After firing a few rounds in the woods, it was discovered that the
  enemy was turning our right flank, and we were ordered to fall back,
  which was done in good order until we reached half way across the
  open field, when we became exposed to a cross-fire of the enemy, the
  effect of which was most deadly upon officers and men.

  Our loss up to this time had been comparatively slight, but in a
  few minutes we lost nearly half of the regiment, and that, too, without
  inflicting the slightest damage upon the enemy.  We finally
  reached the wood, when we were enabled to reform and face the
  enemy.

  Our loss in this engagement was fearful.  Out of 261 enlisted men
  and 25 officers, the regiment lost 106 enlisted men and 10 commissioned
  officers, among the latter some of our best officers.  Capt.
  Thomas O. Barri was wounded early in the retreat, and while being
  kindly assisted to the rear by Lieut. Herbert Kenaston, Eleventh U.
  S. Infantry, both were struck down.  The former lived long enough
  to die in the arms of his companions.  In their loss the regiment
  mourns two gallant officers.  The former had particularly endeared
  himself by his social and amiable qualities.  Second Lieut. Henry
  Rochford, a promising young officer, fell about the same time, mortally
  wounded.

  The following is a list of the officers who still survive their wounds:
  First Lieut. Matthew Elder and Second Lieut. A. J. Barber, legs amputated
  above the knee; Second Lieut. Lemuel Pettee, leg shattered
  above the ankle; Second Lieut. O. H. Nealy, wounded in neck; Capt.
  J. M. Goodhue, finger amputated; Capt. W. G. Edgerton, wounded
  by spent ball (for duty), and Second Lieut. A. A. Harbach, struck in
  thigh, not seriously.

  Where all did so well it is difficult to particularize.  I therefore
  give the names of those officers who participated, in addition to those
  already enumerated: Capts. George Gibson, C. S. Russell, and Caleb
  R. Layton; First Lieuts. E. A. Ellsworth, G. E. Head, I. B. Wright,
  James P. Pratt, Joseph M. Ritner, and F. A. Field, battalion adjutant,
  and Second Lieuts. E. S. Huntington, R. Robins, J. McIntosh,
  Wright Staples, and David Hazzard.  Capt. Gibson joined us
  from detached service in time to take part.

  Respectfully,

  De L. FLOYD-JONES,
  Maj. Eleventh U. S. Infantry, Comdg. Regt.

  Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.,
  Second Brigade, Second Division, Fifth Corps.

Source:  Official Records: Series I. Vol. 27. Part I. Reports. Serial No. 43
Civil War

The fourth[1][2] 11th Infantry was organized on May 4, 1861 by direction of the President.[8] On May 14, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln issued an executive order, directing an increase of the regimental organizations of the Regular Army. The 11th Infantry was the first, numerically, of the nine infantry regiments, of three battalions of eight companies each, were of the increase authorized. In G. O. No. 33, A. G. O., series of 1861, in contrast to the original ten regular regiments of infantry, which were organized on the traditional ten-company line. The 11th Infantry was organized at Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, as regimental headquarters, and which remained the 11th's headquarters during the War.[9] Erasmus D. Keyes was served as colonel of the 11th U.S. Infantry from 14 May 1861 to 6 May 1864.[1] William S. Ketchum served as colonel of the 11th U.S. Infantry 6 May 1864 to 15 March 1869.[1]

After six companies had been organized and assigned to the 1st Battalion, 11th Infantry Regiment, it was ordered to Perryville, Maryland, October 10, 1861, and duty there until March 1862. Ordered to Washington, D.C. Attached to Sykes' Regular Infantry, Reserve Brigade, Army Potomac, to May 1862. The 11th then campaigned September 1863 to November 1864 as part of the 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac and 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to January 1865.[8]

The 11th took part in the following: Peninsula Campaign, Siege of Yorktown, Battle of Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Turkey Bridge June 30, Battle of Malvern Hill Malvern Hill, At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Centerville August 16–28. Pope's Northern Virginia Campaign, Battle of Groveton August 29, Second Battle of Bull Run, Maryland Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Shepherdstown Ford September 19–20, Battle of Fredericksburg, "Mud March", Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6, Battle of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg Campaign, Battle of Gettysburg, Pursuit of Lee July 5–24. On special duty at New York August 21-September 14. Rejoined army, Bristoe Campaign, Second Battle of Rappahannock Station, Mine Run Campaign, Rapidan Campaign, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna River, Pamunkey May 26–28, Battle of Totopotomoy Creek, Battle of Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church June 1–3, Second Battle of Petersburg, Siege of Petersburg, Mine Explosion, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Poplar Springs Church, Peeble's Farm, Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run.[8]

Moved to Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, November 2, thence to Baltimore, Maryland., November 18, and to Annapolis, Maryland., December 5. Duty at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md., until January 26, 1865. Ordered to City Point, Virginia., January 26, and camp near Gen. Grant's Headquarters until March 8. Provost duty at Headquarters, Army Potomac, until May, and at Richmond. Va., until October, 1865.[8]

The regiment lost during the Civil War 8 Officers and 117 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 86 Enlisted men by disease. Total, 213.[8]

After the surrender, the 11th Infantry with other Regular troops, was sent to Richmond, Va., where it arrived May 3d. It did provost duty in Richmond until the civil government of the city was organized, and at Libby Prison until its use was discontinued. During the summer and fall of 1865 the twenty-four companies of the regiment were organized. In the summer of 1866, the regiment suffered a great mortality from cholera.[10]


Mississippi Veteran wearing a Forrest Celluloid Badge Photograph

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An outstanding veteran photo of a veteran from Camp no. 1099, Tallahatchie County, Charleston, Mississippi.  The veteran is wearing a ladder badge, a camp ribbon from Camp no. 1099, and a General Nathan Bedford Forrest celluloid scroll badge.  He is also wearing his UCV uniform and holding his cane.  The photograph has a photographer mark of "Bell - Memphis".  Also on the back are four stickers from the "C.W. Gillan Drug Store, Leland, Mississippi.  The actual photograph is approximately 5 5/8 inches by 3 7/8 inches.  The card it is attched to is approximately 7 3/8 inches by 5 5/8 inches.


General Richard S. Ewell CDV

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Ewell graduated from West Point in 1840 and spent his entire ante-bellum career in the Southwest, winning a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War. He resigned the U.S. Army and was made a brigadier general in the Confederate Army. He lost a leg at the battle of Groveton. He led the 2nd Corps from Gettysburg to Spottsylvania. He ended the war in charge of the Richmond defenses and was captured at Saylor's Creek on April 6, 1865. The backmark is E.&H.T. Anthony, New York.
 
                                                                Richard Stoddert Ewell
                                                                  (1817-1872)

                                                                                 Ewell.jpg (9211 bytes)

As Stonewall Jackson's successor, the gallant Richard S. Ewell proved to be a disappointment and the argument as to why is still around today. Some claim it was the loss of a leg, others that it was the influence of the "Widow Brown" who he married during his recovery. But the fact of the matter is that he was ill-prepared by Jackson for the loose style of command practiced by Lee.
A West Pointer (1840) and veteran of two decades as a company officer, he never quite made the adjustment to commanding large-scale units. He once went out foraging for his division and returned-with a single steer-as if he was still commanding a company of dragoons. Resigning his captaincy on May 7, 1861, to serve the South, he held the following assignments: colonel, Cavalry (1861); brigadier general, CSA June 17, 1861); commanding brigade (in lst Corps after July 20), Army of the Potomac (June 20 - October 22, 1861); commanding brigade, Longstreet's Division, Potomac District, Department of Northern Virginia (October 22, 1861 -February 21, 1862); major general, CSA January 23, 1862); commanding E. K. Smith's (old) Division, same district and department (February 21-May 17, 1862); commanding same division, Valley District, same department (May 17 - June 26, 1862); commanding division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia June 26 - August 28, 1862); commanding the corps (May 30, 1863-May 27, 1864); lieutenant general, CSA (May 23, 1863); and commanding Department of Richmond June 13, 1864 April 6, 1865).
After serving at lst Bull Run he commanded a division under Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign where he complained bitterly about being left in the dark about plans. Jackson's style of leadership was to prove the undoing of Ewell once Jackson was gone. Ewell fought through the Seven Days and at Cedar Mountain before being severely wounded and losing a leg at Groveton, in the beginning of the battle of 2nd Bull Run. After a long recovery, he returned to duty in May 1863 and was promoted to command part of Jackson's old corps. At 2nd Winchester he won a stunning victory and for a moment it looked like a second Stonewall had come. However, at Gettysburg he failed to take advantage of the situation on the evening of the first day when given discretionary orders by Lee.
He required exact instructions, unlike his predecessor. After serving through the fall campaigns he fought at the Wilderness where the same problem developed. At Spotsylvania one of his divisions was all but destroyed. After the actions along the North Anna he was forced to temporarily relinquish command due to illness but Lee made it permanent. He was given command in Richmond and was captured at Sayler's Creek on April 6, 1865, during the retreat to Appomattox. After his release from Fort Warren in July "Old Baldy" retired to a farm near Spring Hill, Tennessee, where he died on January 25, 1872. He is buried in the Old City Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee. (Hamlin, Percy Gatling, "Old Bald Head")
Source: "Who Was Who In The Civil War" by Stewart Sifakis

and was captured at Saylor's Creek on April 6, 1865. The backmark is E.&H.T. Anthony, New York.

General John C. Bowen CDV

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A nice CDV of General John S. Bowen. Bowen was born in Savannah, Georgia and graduated from West Point. Before the war he was an architect in St. Louis, Missouri. He was appointed colonel of the 1st Missouri Infantry. He was promoted to brigadier general on March 14, 1862 and major general May 25, 1863. He was wounded at Shiloh and died after the surrender of Vicksburg on July 13, 1863. The backmark on this CDV is "Published by E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, from Photographic Negative in BRADY'S National Portrait Gallery". A period ink identification is on the back of the CDV.
 
Major-General John S. Bowen was born in Georgia in 1829. He was appointed to the United States military academy in 1848 and on graduation was promoted to brevet second-lieutenant, July 1, 1853. Being assigned to the Mounted Rifles, he served at the Carlisle cavalry school, and on the frontier, with promotion to second lieutenant on July 20, 1854. He resigned his commission on the 1st of May, 1856, and became an architect in Savannah, GA, continuing to gratify his military tastes as lieutenant-colonel of Georgia militia. He removed to St. Louis, Mo., in 1857, where he also followed the business of an architect. From 1859 to 1861 he was captain in the Missouri militia. He was adjutant to General Frost during his expedition to the Kansas border in search of Montgomery, a prominent character in the Kansas troubles. When the civil war began he commanded the Second regiment of Frost's brigade. He was acting chief-of-staff to Frost when Camp Jackson was captured by General Lyon. Going to Memphis, Tenn., and into the southeastern part of Missouri, he raised the First Missouri regiment of infantry, of which he was commissioned colonel on June 11, 1861. He was assigned to the army of General Polk at Columbus, Ky., and acted as brigade commander under that officer's command. When in the spring of 1862 Albert Sidney Johnston and Beauregard were concentrating their armies for an attack upon Grant, Bowen, who on March 14h had received his commission as brigadier-general, was assigned to the division of John C. Breckinridge. In the first day's battle at Shiloh he was wounded. General Beauregard, in his official report of the battle thus speaks: "Brig.Gens. B. R. Johnson and Bowen, most meritorious officers, were also severely wounded in the first combat, but it is hoped will soon be able to return to duty with their brigades." When in 1863 Grant crossed the Mississippi and landed at Bruinsburg, General Bowen, though fearfully outnumbered, threw himself in his path and with the utmost courage and determination, resisted his advance. After a patriotic sacrifice he was forced back upon the main army under Pemberton. On the 25th of May he was rewarded for his brave work at Port Gibson by the commission of major-general in the army of the Confederate States. He fought with distinction in the other battles outside of Vicksburg, and in all the fighting and suffering of the long siege he and his men had their full share. At the fall of the city he was paroled, and went to Raymond, Miss., where he died from sickness contracted during the siege, July 16, 1863.

General John C. Pemberton CDV

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A nice image of General John C. Pemberton, the defender of Vicksburg.  Pemberton was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1814 and graduated from West Point in 1837.  In 1848 he married Martha Thompson of Norfolk, Virginia.  In 1861 he resigned the US Regular Army, and was commisioned into the Confederate Army.  He rose quickly in the ranks and eneded up a Lieutenant General in October 1862.  He was given command of the Department of Mississippi and Eastern Louisiana, an area which embraced the all important stronghold of Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He surrenedered Vicksburg to General U.S. Grant on July 4, 1863.  He resigned his Lieutenant General commision and served the rest of the war as a Colonel of artillery. 
 
The image does not have a backmark.  Written in pencil on the back of the image is "Lieut Genl John C. Pemeberton - Virginia - CSA". 

John Clifford Pemberton
(1814-1881)


Born August 10, 1814, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, John Clifford Pemberton's marriage to a Virginia woman influenced him to fight for the South. By wars end, he had become one of the Confederacy's most controversial generals.
An 1837 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, Pemberton saw action in the Second Seminole War and was decorated for bravery in the Mexican War. In peacetime, he proved to he an effective administrative officer. Though his defenders would later claim that Pemberton frequently exhibited antebellum pro-Southern sentiments, there is much evidence to the contrary When war broke out in 1861, he agonized for weeks before coming to Virginia to fight for his wife's native land.
Pemberton's first significant duty came in March 1862, when he was promoted to major general and took command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia. Always adept at military politics, he had moved rapidly upward in rank despite a lack of accomplishments.
The new commander soon was embroiled in controversy Many South Carolinians feared that the Northern-born general was not dedicated to an all-out defense of the department. Pemberton added to their fears by declaring that, if he had to make a choice, he would abandon the area rather than risk losing his outnumbered army When state officials complained to Robert B. Lee, Pemberton's predecessor and now adviser to Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Lee told Pemberton that he must defend the department at all cost. Pemberton was eventually relieved from command, but he had learned a fateful lesson from Lee.
Despite Pemberton's preference for administrative duties and his problems in South Carolina, Davis promoted him to lieutenant general and gave him arguably the most difficult command in the Confederacy Pemberton was to defend Vicksburg, a Mississippi city standing on high bluffs above the Mississippi River. Its defenses were the last major river obstacle to Union shipping.
Taking command of the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana on October 14, 1862, Pemberton immediately set to work solving supply problems and improving troop morale. For several months he enjoyed remarkable success, defeating attempts by Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant to take Vicksburg in the winter of 1862--1863.
In the spring, however, Grant confused Pemberton with a series of diversions and crossed the Mississippi below Vicksburg practically unnoticed. Grant was free to maneuver because Pemberton had remembered Lees admonishment and had fought to hold Vicksburg at all cost. Jefferson Davis reinforced Pemberton's thinking with an order not to give up the river city "for a single day" Now that Grant had successfully crossed the Mississippi, Pemberton determined to stay close to Vicksburg. Davis complicated matters by sending Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Mississippi to try to reverse declining Confederate fortunes. Johnston ordered Pemberton to unite his forces and attack Grant, if practicable, even if that meant abandoning the defense of Vicksburg.
Torn by conflicting orders, Pemberton marked time while Grant swept inland scoring a series of quick victories at Port Gibson, Raymond, and Jackson. Pemberton finally tried to please both Davis and Johnston. He moved his army east from Edwards Station, all the while maintaining close contact with Vicksburg. A new order from Johnston forced Pemberton to reverse his course and unite with Johnston's forces that had been defeated at Jackson. Before the order could be carried out, Pemberton's army bumped into Grants forces at Champions Hill and suffered a major defeat. Pemberton retreated to the Big Black River where he suffered more heavy losses. Remembering Lees and Davis's orders, Pemberton chose to ignore another order from Vicksburg. He would try to save the city even if that meant risking the loss of his army. He retreated into the city where he and his men endured a forty-seven day siege before surrendering on July 4, 1863. Pemberton became a pariah in the South and was accused by his immediate superior, General Johnston, of causing he Confederate disaster by disobeying orders.
John Pemberton might have made a positive contribution to the Confederate war effort had his talents been properly used. An able administrator, he was uncomfortable in combat. He had demonstrated his weaknesses in South Carolina, yet Davis had sent him to Mississippi anyway. A few months after Vicksburg, Pemberton displayed his loyalty to the Confederate cause by requesting a reduction in rank. He served the cause the remainder of the war as a lieutenant colonel of artillery in Virginia and South Carolina.
After the war he settled on a farm near Warrenton, Virginia, and eventually returned to his native Pennsylvania, where he died July 13, 1881, in the village of Penllyn. He is buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.
Source: MacMillan Information Now Encyclopedia "The Confederacy." Article by Michael B. Ballard

 

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