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Lt. Colonel William Avery, 95 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice image of Lt. Colonel William Avery of the 95th Illinois Infnatry.  He enlisted as Captain in September 1862.  He was promoted to Major in May 1863 and Lt. Colonel in June 1864.  He mustered out in August 1865.  Written on the back in period ink is "Major Wm. Avery, 95th Ill Inftry".  The backmark is "Capitol Gallery,  West side Square, Springfield, Ill. - C.H. Hall, Artist.".

SERVICE - Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. At Memphis January 13-20, 1863. Moved to Lake Providence, La., January 20-26, and duty there till April. Skirmish at Old River, Lake Providence, February 10. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., April 12. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battles of Fort Gibson, Miss., May 1; Raymond May 12; Jackson May 14; Champion's Hill May 16; Big Black River May 17. Siege of Vicksburg May 18 - July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19-22 and June 25, Expedition to Mechanicsburg May 26 - June 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Moved to Natchez, Miss., July 12-13, and duty there till October 17. Moved to Vicksburg October 17 and duty there till February, 1864. Meridian Campaign February 3-25. Veterans on furlough March - April. Red River Campaign March 10 - May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Battle of Pleasant Hill, Pleasant Hill Landing, April 12-13. About Cloutiersville April 22-24. Natchitochez April 22. At Alexandria April 26 - May 13. Boyce's Plantation and Wells' Plantation May 6. Twelve Mile Bayou and Bayou Boeuf May 7. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Yellow Bayou May 18. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 21-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., May 28-30. Sturgis' Expedition to Guntown June 1-13. Brice's or Tishamingo Creek near Guntown June 10. Ripley June 11. Moved to St. Charles, Ark., August 3-6, thence to Duvall's Bluff September 1, and to Brownsville September 8. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17 - November 21. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 23-30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Moved to Eastport, Miss., and duty there till February 6, 1865. (Veterans Joined 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps, at Cairo, Ill., thence moved to Clifton, Tenn., and march to Ackworth, Ga., via Huntsville and Decatur, Ala., and Rome, Ga., April 28 - June 8, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign June 8 to September 8. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10 - July 2. Assault on Kenesaw Mountain June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Howell's Ferry July 5. On line of the Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Leggett's Bald Hill July 20-21. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22 - August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31 - September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29 - November 3. Rejoined Regiment at Nashville, Tenn.) Moved to New Orleans, La., February 6-21, 1865, and duty there till March 12. Campaign against Mobile and its defenses March 21 - April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26 - April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery, Ala., April 13-25, and duty there till July. Moved to Meridian and Vicksburg, Miss.

Mustered out August 17, 1865. Recruits transferred to 47th Illinois Infantry.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 77 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 204 Enlisted men by disease. Total 289.

 

Lt. Robert Griffin, 99 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice image of 1st Lieutenant Robert H. Griffin of the 99th Illinois Infantry.  The image is signed "Yours truly, R.H. Griffin" in period ink on the front of the image.  The backmark is "From Harvey's New York Photographic Gallery, 106 Poydras st. Between Camp and St. Charles, New Orleans.". 
 

SERVICE of the 99th Illinois Infantry 

  • Moved from Rolla to Salem, Mo., September 17, 1862, and duty there till November 20.
  • Moved to Houston, Mo., November 20, and duty there till January 27, 1863.
    • Action at Beaver Creek, Texas County, November 24, 1862.
    • Hartsville, Wood's Forks, January 11, 1863.
  • Moved to West Plains, Mo., January 27, and duty there till March 3.
  • Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., March 3-15, and duty there till April 11.
  • To New Carthage April 11-12 and duty there till April 25.
  • Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30.
  • Battles of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1,
  • Champion's Hill May 16;
  • Big Black River Bridge May 17.
  • Siege of Vicksburg May 18-July 4.
    • Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22.
    • Surrender of Vicksburg July 4.
  • Advance to Jackson Miss. July 6-10.
  • Siege of Jackson July 10-17.
  • Duty at Vicksburg till August 20.
  • Ordered to New Orleans, La., August 20.
  • Duty at Carrollton Brashear City and Berwick till October.
  • Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 9.
  • Moved to New Orleans November 9-12,
  • thence to Mustang Island, Texas, November 16-25.
  • Duty at Indianola till June, 1864.
  • Moved to Algiers, La., June 16.
  • Duty at Kennersville, Algiers, and Morganza till September.
  • Moved to St. Charles, Ark., September 3-11, and duty there till October 23.
  • Expedition to Duvall's Bluff October 23-November 12.
  • Moved to Litle Rock, thence to Memphis, Tenn., November 12-26.
  • At Germantown, Tenn. guarding railroad till December 28.
  • Moved to Memphis, Tenn., December 28,
  • thence to New Orleans, La. January 1-9, 1865.
  • Campaign against Mobile, Ala., and its defenses February 1-April 12.
    • Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8.
    • Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9.
    • Occupation of Mobile April 12.
  • Moved to New Orleans, thence to Shreve port, La., May 28-June 6.
  • To Baton Rouge July 19.
  • Mustered out July 31 and discharged at Springfield, Ill, August 9, 1865.

Regiment lost during service

  • 4 Officers and 47 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and
  • 1 Officer and 120 Enlisted men by disease.
  • Total 172.
 

Lewis Conrad, 106 Illinois Infantry Quarter Plate Image

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A nice quarter plate tintype of Lewis Conrad of the 106th Illinois Infantry.  The image has a full standing Conrad wearing a neat hat with feathers on the side.  He is also wearing his uniform vest and a four button sack coat.  He is standing in front of a painted back drop of tents and US flags.  Written on the back of the tin plate is "Lewis Conrad" in pencil.  The image is in a half box that was not original to the image and has another identification in it. 

SERVICE - Assigned to Provost duty at Jackson, Tenn., and as railroad guard along Mobile & Ohio R. R. till March, 1863. Repulse of Forest's attack on Jackson December 20, 1862. Railroad crossing Forked Deer River December 20 (Cos. "H," "I" and "K"). Moved to Bolivar, Tenn., March, 1863; thence to Vicksburg, Miss., May 31. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., June 9 - July 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Ordered to Helena, Ark., July 29; thence moved to Clarendon, Ark., August 13, and to Duvall's Bluff August 22. Steele's Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., September 1-10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Duty there till October 26. Pursuit of Marmaduke's Forces October 26 - November 1. Duty at Little Rock, Duvall's Bluff, Hot Springs, Lewisburg, St. Charles, Dardanelles and Brownsville, Ark., till July, 1865. Operations against Shelby north of the Arkansas River May 13-31, 1864. Action at Clarendon June 25-26. Scouts from Pine Bluff toward Camden and Monticello January 26-31, 1865. Expedition from Little Rock to Mt. Elba January 22 - February 4, 1865.

Mustered out July 12 and discharged at Springfield, Ill., July 24, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 3 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 7 Officers and 188 Enlisted men by disease. Total 198.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Captain Samuel H. Blane, 106 Illinois Infantry CDV with Pine Bluff, ARK Backmark

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A wonderful full standing, armed image of Captain Samuel H. Blane of the 106th Illinois Infantry.  Blane enlisted
in June 1863 and commisioned 2nd Lieutenant.  He was promoted to 1st Lieut. on March 30, 1864 and Captain in May 1865.  Signed in period ink on the back is "Yours truly, S.H. Blane".  The backmark on the back of the image is "Habicht & Mealy Photographers, Pine Bluff, Ark.".  Blane is standing and is wearing his gauntlets and holding his sword.  This image is very clear.

SERVICE - Assigned to Provost duty at Jackson, Tenn., and as railroad guard along Mobile & Ohio R. R. till March, 1863. Repulse of Forest's attack on Jackson December 20, 1862. Railroad crossing Forked Deer River December 20 (Cos. "H," "I" and "K"). Moved to Bolivar, Tenn., March, 1863; thence to Vicksburg, Miss., May 31. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., June 9 - July 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Ordered to Helena, Ark., July 29; thence moved to Clarendon, Ark., August 13, and to Duvall's Bluff August 22. Steele's Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., September 1-10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Duty there till October 26. Pursuit of Marmaduke's Forces October 26 - November 1. Duty at Little Rock, Duvall's Bluff, Hot Springs, Lewisburg, St. Charles, Dardanelles and Brownsville, Ark., till July, 1865. Operations against Shelby north of the Arkansas River May 13-31, 1864. Action at Clarendon June 25-26. Scouts from Pine Bluff toward Camden and Monticello January 26-31, 1865. Expedition from Little Rock to Mt. Elba January 22 - February 4, 1865.

Mustered out July 12 and discharged at Springfield, Ill., July 24, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 3 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 7 Officers and 188 Enlisted men by disease. Total 198.

 
 
 
 
 

Pvt. J. L. Hall, 106 Illinois Infantry CDV with Little ROck, ARK Backmark

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A full standing image of Private J.L. Hall of the 106th Illinois Infantry.  Hall is wearing his uniform vest, frock coat, and pants.  Written on the back of the image is "Jim Hall member of the 106 regiment - once lived in Illiopolis".  The backmark on the back of the image is "Photographed by A.J. Millard, Markham St., Little Rock, ARK.". 
 
SERVICE - Assigned to Provost duty at Jackson, Tenn., and as railroad guard along Mobile & Ohio R. R. till March, 1863. Repulse of Forest's attack on Jackson December 20, 1862. Railroad crossing Forked Deer River December 20 (Cos. "H," "I" and "K"). Moved to Bolivar, Tenn., March, 1863; thence to Vicksburg, Miss., May 31. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., June 9 - July 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Ordered to Helena, Ark., July 29; thence moved to Clarendon, Ark., August 13, and to Duvall's Bluff August 22. Steele's Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., September 1-10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Duty there till October 26. Pursuit of Marmaduke's Forces October 26 - November 1. Duty at Little Rock, Duvall's Bluff, Hot Springs, Lewisburg, St. Charles, Dardanelles and Brownsville, Ark., till July, 1865. Operations against Shelby north of the Arkansas River May 13-31, 1864. Action at Clarendon June 25-26. Scouts from Pine Bluff toward Camden and Monticello January 26-31, 1865. Expedition from Little Rock to Mt. Elba January 22 - February 4, 1865.

Mustered out July 12 and discharged at Springfield, Ill., July 24, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 3 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 7 Officers and 188 Enlisted men by disease. Total 198.


Lt. John E. McDermot, 108th Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice image of Lt. John E. McDermot of the 108th Illinois Infantry.  McDermot mustered into the Field & Staff of the 108th Illinois on August 28, 1862.  He was promoted to 2nd Lt. on January 13, 1863, 1st Lt. on May 30, 1863, and Captain on June 13, 1864.  There is no backmark.  Written on the back of the image in period ink is "Respectfully Jno. E. McDermot".  McDermot mustered out in August 1865.

SERVICE - March to Louisville, Ky., November 14-19, 1862; thence moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 21-26, and duty there till December 20. Sherman's Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862, to January 2, 1863. Chickasaw Bayou December 26-28, 1862. Chickasaw Bluff December 29. Expedition to Arkansas Post, Ark., January 3-10, 1863. Assault and capture of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, January 10-11. Moved to Young's Point, La., January 17-24, and duty there till March 10. At Milliken's Bend, La., till April 25. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battles of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1. Champion's Hill May 16. Detached to guard prisoners from Big Black River to Memphis, Tenn., May 16-30. At Young's Point, La., during siege of Vicksburg and until July 18. Moved to Vicksburg July 18, thence to Memphis, Tenn., July 26-29, and to LaGrange, Tenn., August 5. Duty there till October 28, and at Pocahontas till November 9. At Corinth, Miss., till January 25, 1864. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., and duty there till February, 1865. Sturgis' Expedition to Guntown, Miss., June 1-13, 1864. Brice's (or Tishamingo) Creek, near Guntown, June 10. Ripley June 11. Repulse of Forest's attack on Memphis August 21, 1864. Moved to New Orleans, La.; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., February 28 - March 16. Operations against Mobile and its defenses March 16 - April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26 - April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there till July 18. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., July 18 - August 5.

Mustered out August 5, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 8 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 202 Enlisted men by disease. Total 214.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Private David W. Evans, 108 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A seated view of Private David W. Evans of the 108th Illinois Infantry.   Evans is wearing a frock coat and a uniform vest underneath.  THe backmark on the image is "Howard & Hall, Artists, Corinth, Miss.".  Signed on the back in period ink is "D.W> Evans, Metamora, Illinois".  Evans mustered in in August 1862 and mustered out in June 1865. 

SERVICE - March to Louisville, Ky., November 14-19, 1862; thence moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 21-26, and duty there till December 20. Sherman's Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862, to January 2, 1863. Chickasaw Bayou December 26-28, 1862. Chickasaw Bluff December 29. Expedition to Arkansas Post, Ark., January 3-10, 1863. Assault and capture of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, January 10-11. Moved to Young's Point, La., January 17-24, and duty there till March 10. At Milliken's Bend, La., till April 25. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battles of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1. Champion's Hill May 16. Detached to guard prisoners from Big Black River to Memphis, Tenn., May 16-30. At Young's Point, La., during siege of Vicksburg and until July 18. Moved to Vicksburg July 18, thence to Memphis, Tenn., July 26-29, and to LaGrange, Tenn., August 5. Duty there till October 28, and at Pocahontas till November 9. At Corinth, Miss., till January 25, 1864. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., and duty there till February, 1865. Sturgis' Expedition to Guntown, Miss., June 1-13, 1864. Brice's (or Tishamingo) Creek, near Guntown, June 10. Ripley June 11. Repulse of Forest's attack on Memphis August 21, 1864. Moved to New Orleans, La.; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., February 28 - March 16. Operations against Mobile and its defenses March 16 - April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26 - April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there till July 18. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., July 18 - August 5.

Mustered out August 5, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 8 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 202 Enlisted men by disease. Total 214.

 
 
 
 

Major Robert W. McClaughry, 118 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice full standing image of Major Robert W. McClaughry of the 118th Illinois Infantry.  If you look on his kepi on the stand, you can see "118" in the infnatry horn pin.  There is no backmark.

SERVICE - Sherman's Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862, to January 2, 1863. Chickasaw Bayou December 26-28, 1862. Chickasaw Bluffs December 29. Yazoo River January 2, 1863. Expedition to Arkansas Post, Ark., January 3-10. Assault and capture of Fort Hindman January 10-11. Moved to Young's Point, La., January 17-23, and duty there till March 9. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., March 9. Operations from Milliken's Bend to New Carthage March 31 - April 17. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Thompson's Hill, Port Gibson, May 1. Champion's Hill May 16. Big Black River May 17. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18 - July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. At Black River Bridge May 24 - July 6. Regiment mounted June 10. Edwards' Ferry July 1 (Detachment). Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 6-10. Near Clinton July 8 (Detachment). Near Jackson July 9. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Raid to Brookhaven July 17-20. Brookhaven July 18. At Vicksburg July 25 - August 8. Moved to Port Hudson August 8-9, thence to Carrollton, La., August 15-16, and to Bayou Boeuf September 5-7. To Brashear City September 16. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3 - November 30. Regiment mounted October 11, 1863. Vermillionville October 15. Carrion Crow Bayou October 16-20. Grand Coteau October 19. Reconnaissance toward Opelousas October 20. Barrie's Landing, Opelousas, October 21. Scouting and skirmishing about Opelousas October 22-30. Washington October 24. Bayou Bourbeaux November 2. Carrion Crow Bayou November 3. Bayou Sara November 9. Near Vermillionville November 11. At New Iberia November 15 - December 18. Camp Pratt November 20. Scout to Vermillion Bayou November 22-23. Scout to St. Martinsville December 2-3. Moved to Donaldsonville December 18-23, thence to Port Hudson January 3-7, and duty there till July 3, 1864. On scout January 12. Capture of Jackson, Miss., February 10. Skirmish February 16. Raid to Bayou Sara and skirmish February 22. Raid to Jackson March 3. Skirmishes March 26-28, April 1 and 5, May 15, June 13 and 17. Bayou Grosse Tete March 30 and April 2. Plains Store April 7. Redwood Bayou May 3. Moved to Baton Rouge July 3. Operations about Baton Rouge July 3-25. Expedition to Davidson's Ford, near Clinton, July 17-18. Olive Branch August 5. Lee's Expedition to Clinton August 23-29. Comite River and Clinton August 25. Hodge's Plantation September 11. Expedition to Amite River, New River and Bayou Manchac October 2-8. Expedition to Clinton, Greensburg, etc., October 5-9. Lee's Expedition to Brookhaven, Miss., November 14-21. Liberty November 18. Davidson's Expedition to West Pascagoula against Mobile& Ohio R. R. November 27 - December 13. Outpost duty at Baton Rouge till May 22, 1865. Expedition west of Mississippi River February 2-3. Expedition to Olive Branch, La., March 1-10. Provost duty at Baton Rouge till October. Expedition to Clinton and Comite River March 30 - April 2. Mustered out October 1. Moved to Camp Butler, Ill., October 2-10.

Discharged October 13, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 21 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 182 Enlisted men by disease. Total 207.


Lt. Levi M. Moore, 118th Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice bust image of Lt. Levi M. Moore of the 118th Illinois Infantry.  Lt. Moore was mustered in November 17, 1862 and was discharged in August 1865.  He was promoted to 2nd Lt. on February 19, 1863 and 1st Lt. October 21, 1863.  The backmark on the image is "T. Lilienthal, 102 Poydras St., New Orleans".

The troops composing this Regiment enlisted under the call of the President of July 2, 1862, and the companies were formed during August, 1862, and from the following places and counties: Company A, Captain Thomas J. Campbell, Fountain Green; Company B, Captain R. W. McClaughry, Carthage; Company C, Captain A. W. Marsh, Hamilton; Company E, Captain J.S. Allen, Warsaw; and Company H, Captain F. G. Mourning, Basco, all in Hancock county,--Company D, Captain J. H. Holton, Quincy; Company F, Captain W. J. Evans, Richfield, and Company K, Captain J. D. Rosenbook, Mendon, Adams county; Company G, Captain Joseph Shaw, Terre Haute, Henderson county, and Company I, Captain Charles During, Gallatin county.

The companies rendevoused at Camp Butler during the month of September, 1862, were respectively sworn into the service by Adjutant General Fuller, and organized into a Regiment. In Octoer an election was held for Regimental officers, at which Major John G. Fonda, of the Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, then commanding Camp Butler, was selected Lieutenant Colonel, Captain R. W. McClaughry, Major, Madison Reece, Surgeon, J. K. Boude, Assistant Surgeon, W. K. Davison, Quartermaster, and Thomas M. Walker, Chaplain.

The Regiment remained on duty in charge of the post and guarding rebel prisoners until December. It was mustered into the United States service on the 7th of November, 1862, by Captain Washington, for three years,--with a total of 820 men and officers. November 21, it was armed with Enfield Rifles. November 29, Lieutenant Colonel Fonda was promoted to Colonel, and Captain Thomas Logan, of Company G, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, was made Lieutenant Colonel. December 1, left by Chicago and Alton Railroad, for Alton, and there by boat to St. Louis and below, arrived at Memphis, Tenn., and went into camp on Wolf River. Here the Regiment was assigned to the First Brigade (Colonel Sheldon, Forty-second Ohio commanding) Third Division, General G. W. Morgan--and Thirteenth Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee. While here received its first tents, first watery beds, first "powder and ball" cartridges, its first scare, first "turn out for firing on the pickets," and first introduction to rebel jay hawkers, in a day and night skirmish.

On December 20, embarked on the steamer "Northener" with forces under General Sherman, for Vicksburg, Miss. Reached Milliken's Bend December 25, and the following day proceeded up the Yazoo River, and participated in the attack upon Chickasaw Bluffs, from 26th of December to January 2, 1863. On January 2, after the troops had re-embarked, the Regiment while on boat was under a heavy fire from a rebel line.

From here proceeded with the force under General McClernand to Arkansas Post, Ark., and took part in the two days fight January 10 and 11, which resulted in the capture of the fort and some 6,000 prisoners.

January 23, returned to Young's Point, La., where it assisted in digging in the famous "canal," and remained til March 9, when it moved to Milliken's Bend and went into camp.

The Regiment was now Brigaded with the Forty-ninth and Sixty-ninth Indiana, One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio, Seventh Kentucky, First Wisconsin and Seventh Michigan Batteries and part of the Third Illinois Cavalry, as the First Brigade, General T.T. Garrard commanding, Ninth Division, General P. J. Osterhaus, and Thirteenth Army Corps, General John A. McClernand. On April 2, moved out in the expedition against Vicksburg under General Grant, crossed the Mississippi River at Bruinsburg April 30, 1863, and took part in the battle of Thompson's Hill (Port Gibson,) May 1, Champion Hill, May 16, Black River Bridge, May 17, and the assault upon Vicksburg May 19to 23--in the former two and the latter two suffering severely in killed and wounded--in the battle of Black River Bridge, a whole rebel regiment was captured by, and surrendered to Company D, commanded by Captain Brown.

May 24, moved with General Osterhaus' Division to Black River Bridge, and there remained until the surrender of Vicksburg, holding the rear against rebel General Joseph Johnston's forces, having frequent skirmishes with them. About June 10, a Battalion of the Regiment was mounted by order of General Grant.

July 6, started with force under General Sherman to Jackson, Miss., and took part in the fighting and siege from the 10th to the 17th, and from the 17th to the 20th. The mounted portion of the Regiment went on a raid to Brookhaven, a distance of 60 miles, and back, having frequent skirmishes, tore up the railroad and burned the rolling stock and depot buildings.

July 22, started for Vicksburg, where it arrived July 25, and went into camp on the flats below the city.

While here the Regiment was dismounted and its horses turned over to the Quartermaster's Department, and the Regimeny with the Thirteenth Army Corps was turned over to the Department of the Gulf.

August 8, left by boat for Port Hudson, where it went into camp the next day. Remained there until August 15. Shipped for Carrollton, La., and encamped there on the 16th. September 4, joined in a grand review of 20,000 troops, by General Grant and Banks. September 5, crossed the river to Algiers, on the 6th, took cars for Bayou Boeuf, where arrived the morning of the 7th.

September 16, marched to Brashear City on Berwick Bay. September 26, crossed Berwick Bay to Berwick City. October 3, started with an expedition under General Franklin up the Teche Bayou, at Camp Bisland, that night received orders to report to General A.L. Lee, chief of cavalry, Department of Gulf, at Algiers, La. October 6 took the boat to Brashear, and cars to Algiers, arriving there on the morning of October 7.

The Regiment having been again mounted, on October 11, returned by cars to Brasheaar, crossed the bay and started on the march. October 12, marched to Franklin, La. 13th, New Iberia. October 14, rejoined the main force and our Army Corps (Thirteenth.) October 15, passed Vermillionville, having a heavy skirmish, and at night reached "Carrion Crow Bayou." October 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20, scouting and skirmishing. October 18, Colonel Fonda assigned to the command of the Brigade composed of the One Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Mounted Infantry, Second Illinois, Fourteenth New York and First Louisiana Cavalry. October 21, marched to Opelousa, skirmishing all the way. October 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28 and 30, scouting and skirmished with the rebels. November 1, moved back to Bayou Bourbent, or Carrion Crow Bayou, or Grand Goteau, as it is known. November 2, heavy skirmishing . November 3, in the battle of Carrion Crow Bayou, or as sometimes called Grand Goteau, in which our forces lost two regiments and a battery, and about 108 to 150 men killed and wounded.

On the 5th, reached Vermillion Bayou. On the 7th, re-brigaded with Second and Third Illinois Cavalry under command of Colonel Fonda. November 11, battle near Vermillionville, in which lost severely. November 15, moved to New Iberia. November 22 and 23, on a scout to Vermillion Bayou, heavy fight and captured 100 prisoners. December 2 and 3, scout to St. Martinsville, heavy skirmish and took some prisoners. Remained at New Iberia taking part in daily scouts and skirmishing until December 18, when received orders to march to Donaldsonville, La. On December 23, halted at General Bragg's plantation, at night camped on Senator Pugh's plantation--sorry the gentlemen were not at home--but entertained ourselves with the delicacies thereof, reached Donaldsonville on the Mississippi December 24. January 3 to 7, 1864, the Regiment was transferred to Port Hudson. For some time the Regiment was without tents or shelter, in the mud, rain and snow, and suffered intensely, remained here doing outpost duty and scouting andskirmishing almost daily, until July 3. January 12, on a scout, had a skirmish, and captured a number of prisoners. January 21, received the first tents had since last August. February 10, after a fight captured Jackson, La., with some prisoners and much property. February 16, had a skirmish. February 22, a raid to Bayou Sara and a skirmish. March 3, Lieutenant Colonel Logan, with a detachment, went to Baton Rouge, and on the way had a skirmish, and Colonel Fonda with a detachment of the One Hundred and Eighteenth and the Third Illinois Cavalry made a raid to Jackson, La., and had a severe fight. March 26, detachments of the Regiment had skirmishes; Company D, Captain Brown commanding, were entirely surrounded by rebels, but cut their way out taking some prisoners. March 28, 30, April 1 and 5, had scouts and skirmishes. Early in April Lieutenant Colonel Logan, with about 150 men from the One Hundred and Eighteenth and Third Illinois Cavalry, crossed the Mississippi River to superintend the construction of telegraphic lines to Red River, made a scout to Bayou Gross Tete, encountered a largely superior rebel force, and after a determined saber charge had a hand-to-hand fight, routed the rebels, killing and wounding a large number, captured a large quantity of ammunition, stores, etc., captured more prisoners than he had men in his command. April 7, Captain Shaw with 100 men of the One Hundred and Eighteenth and Third Illinois Cavalry and one gun of a New York battery were attacked by 600 rebels, surrounded, and three time cut off from camp. After a desperate fight they succeeded in cutting their way out and reached camp with a loss of only 15 men and the gun.

May 13, 1864, Major R. W. McClaughry appointed Paymaster, U.S.A.

May 15, had a several hours fight with a large force of rebel cavalry, in which they killed and wounded several, and recaptured some prisoners they had before taken. Kept up the telegraph to the mouth of Red River until the failure of the Banks expedition, and while so doing companies A, B and F were on May 3d, cut off by the rebels, and relieved by the gunboat General Bragg.

June 13 and 17, had skirmishes.

July 3, moved to Baton Rouge, and were re-brigaded with the Sixth Missouri, Fourteenth New York and Second Louisiana Cavalry, under command of Colonel Fonda.

August 24th to 27th, with the command of General A. L. Lee, went to Clinton, La., on which we were fighting parts of two days and all one night, having a battle at the Comite River; and on the 26th, repeatedly charged the rebel column, fighting for miles.

September 4, marched to Doyal's Plantation, and September 7, to Hermitage plantation, opposite Donaldsonville, to relieve the Eleventh New York Cavalry. From here scouted the surrounding country almost daily, and fought bushwackers and captured many.

September 14, October 2, 14 and 24, had skirmishes.

November 12th, 200 of the Regiment, under Captain Evans, reported to General Lee, at Baton Rouge, and on the 15th, left with his command on a raid to Liberty, Miss. Part of the Regiment went with a detachment to Summit, on the Jackson and N.O.R.R., having a severe skirmish, and burning depot and cotton. A party went with a detachment to Brookhaven, had a fight, re-captured cannon taken from Captain Shaw, on April 7, and took many prisoners, and the remainder were in battle with General Lee, at Liberty.

November 19, returned to Baton Rouge. November 21, having been gone some seven days, marched 200 miles, and with other forces captured one cannon and over two hundred prisoners, and fought five of the seven days.

November 24, moved from Hermitage to Baton Rouge. November 27, left on an expedition under General Davidson, which marched across the Amite River, past Greenville Springs, Greensburg,Tanglpahoe, across Tanglpahoe and Techfaw River, through Columbia and Bogue Chitto, Mississippi, over Pearl River, near Augusta, Alabama, across Red and Black Creeks, and reached West Pascagoula, on Mississippi Sound, December 12. During several days of this march, had skirnishes. Returned by vessel to New Orleanss, and by boat, to Baton Rouge, on December 27, 1864. From this time to May 22, doing out-post duty, and almost daily scouts into the surrounding country, with frequent skirmishes with the rebels.

February 25, Lieutenant Colonel Logan, with the Regiment, made an expedition west of the Mississippi River. March 1 to 10, in an expedition under General Bailey, to Olive Branch, Louisiana. May 22, 1865, by order, turned the horses over to the Post Quartermaster, and from that time until October 1, remained on provost duty at Baton Rouge.

Colonel Fonda commanded a Cavalry Brigade from October, 1863, until May, 1865. June 28, 1865, he was Breveted Brigadier General, and assigned to the command of the District of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which command he held until October, 1865.

In September, 1865, almost the entire Regiment had the "breakbone fever," and at one time, less than a hundred men and officers being able to do duty.

October 1, 1865, mustered out by Lieutenant E. M. Schuyven, First New Orleans Volunteers.

October 2, embarked on steamer W. R. Carter, for the North. Reached Cairo, Illinois, October 8, St. Louis, Missouri, October 9, thence by railroad to Camp Butler, October 10, 1865, where the Regiment was mustered in November 7, 1862. Were paid off by Paymaster Major Holbrook, on October 13, 1865, and the Regiment thence disbanded and forever seperated.

The number of battles, or days of battles, in which the Regiment or a considerable portion was engaged amounts to over forty. The number of skirmishes in which the Regiment or a detachment took part, outside of mere picket skirnishing, is over sixty; making over one hundred days in which some portion of the Regiment was engaged with the enemy.

The movements by railroad of the Regiment, aggregate some four hundred miles; by steamboat and vessel 3,300 miles, and the marches of the Regiment, as a body, irrespective of what would be termed "scouts," or little expeditions of the Regiment or detachments thereof, about 2,000 miles, making a distance traveled by the Regiment of over 5,700 miles.

The Regiment was mustered in to the service with 800 men and officers; received 283 recruits, making a total of 1,103; mustered out October 1, 1865, 523. The losses are as follows: 267 resigned and discharged for disability; 176 died; 63 missing; 17 killed in battle; 1 dishonorably discharged; 2 accidentally killed; 1 lost at sea; 2 drowned; 1 committed suicide; 7 absent at muster; 3 discharged by the President; 1 dismissed the service, and 25 transferred to other branches of the service, leaving 14 unaccounted for. This statement does not include 36 mustered under cooks, and 25 unassigned recruits who never reached the Regiment.



Capt. Cyrus M. Geddes, 118th Illinois Infantry CDV

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A full standing image of Captain Cyrus M. Geddes of the 118th Illinois Infantry.  Geddes mustered in as a private in May 1863.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieut. in August 1863, 1st Lieut. in Dec. 1863, and Captain in March 1864.  He mustered out October 1865.  The backmark on the image is "A.D. Lytle, Main Street, Baton Rouge, La.".   Written in period ink on the back of the image is "Fraternaly Yours, C.M. Geddes".

The troops composing this Regiment enlisted under the call of the President of July 2, 1862, and the companies were formed during August, 1862, and from the following places and counties: Company A, Captain Thomas J. Campbell, Fountain Green; Company B, Captain R. W. McClaughry, Carthage; Company C, Captain A. W. Marsh, Hamilton; Company E, Captain J.S. Allen, Warsaw; and Company H, Captain F. G. Mourning, Basco, all in Hancock county,--Company D, Captain J. H. Holton, Quincy; Company F, Captain W. J. Evans, Richfield, and Company K, Captain J. D. Rosenbook, Mendon, Adams county; Company G, Captain Joseph Shaw, Terre Haute, Henderson county, and Company I, Captain Charles During, Gallatin county.

The companies rendevoused at Camp Butler during the month of September, 1862, were respectively sworn into the service by Adjutant General Fuller, and organized into a Regiment. In Octoer an election was held for Regimental officers, at which Major John G. Fonda, of the Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, then commanding Camp Butler, was selected Lieutenant Colonel, Captain R. W. McClaughry, Major, Madison Reece, Surgeon, J. K. Boude, Assistant Surgeon, W. K. Davison, Quartermaster, and Thomas M. Walker, Chaplain.

The Regiment remained on duty in charge of the post and guarding rebel prisoners until December. It was mustered into the United States service on the 7th of November, 1862, by Captain Washington, for three years,--with a total of 820 men and officers. November 21, it was armed with Enfield Rifles. November 29, Lieutenant Colonel Fonda was promoted to Colonel, and Captain Thomas Logan, of Company G, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, was made Lieutenant Colonel. December 1, left by Chicago and Alton Railroad, for Alton, and there by boat to St. Louis and below, arrived at Memphis, Tenn., and went into camp on Wolf River. Here the Regiment was assigned to the First Brigade (Colonel Sheldon, Forty-second Ohio commanding) Third Division, General G. W. Morgan--and Thirteenth Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee. While here received its first tents, first watery beds, first "powder and ball" cartridges, its first scare, first "turn out for firing on the pickets," and first introduction to rebel jay hawkers, in a day and night skirmish.

On December 20, embarked on the steamer "Northener" with forces under General Sherman, for Vicksburg, Miss. Reached Milliken's Bend December 25, and the following day proceeded up the Yazoo River, and participated in the attack upon Chickasaw Bluffs, from 26th of December to January 2, 1863. On January 2, after the troops had re-embarked, the Regiment while on boat was under a heavy fire from a rebel line.

From here proceeded with the force under General McClernand to Arkansas Post, Ark., and took part in the two days fight January 10 and 11, which resulted in the capture of the fort and some 6,000 prisoners.

January 23, returned to Young's Point, La., where it assisted in digging in the famous "canal," and remained til March 9, when it moved to Milliken's Bend and went into camp.

The Regiment was now Brigaded with the Forty-ninth and Sixty-ninth Indiana, One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio, Seventh Kentucky, First Wisconsin and Seventh Michigan Batteries and part of the Third Illinois Cavalry, as the First Brigade, General T.T. Garrard commanding, Ninth Division, General P. J. Osterhaus, and Thirteenth Army Corps, General John A. McClernand. On April 2, moved out in the expedition against Vicksburg under General Grant, crossed the Mississippi River at Bruinsburg April 30, 1863, and took part in the battle of Thompson's Hill (Port Gibson,) May 1, Champion Hill, May 16, Black River Bridge, May 17, and the assault upon Vicksburg May 19to 23--in the former two and the latter two suffering severely in killed and wounded--in the battle of Black River Bridge, a whole rebel regiment was captured by, and surrendered to Company D, commanded by Captain Brown.

May 24, moved with General Osterhaus' Division to Black River Bridge, and there remained until the surrender of Vicksburg, holding the rear against rebel General Joseph Johnston's forces, having frequent skirmishes with them. About June 10, a Battalion of the Regiment was mounted by order of General Grant.

July 6, started with force under General Sherman to Jackson, Miss., and took part in the fighting and siege from the 10th to the 17th, and from the 17th to the 20th. The mounted portion of the Regiment went on a raid to Brookhaven, a distance of 60 miles, and back, having frequent skirmishes, tore up the railroad and burned the rolling stock and depot buildings.

July 22, started for Vicksburg, where it arrived July 25, and went into camp on the flats below the city.

While here the Regiment was dismounted and its horses turned over to the Quartermaster's Department, and the Regimeny with the Thirteenth Army Corps was turned over to the Department of the Gulf.

August 8, left by boat for Port Hudson, where it went into camp the next day. Remained there until August 15. Shipped for Carrollton, La., and encamped there on the 16th. September 4, joined in a grand review of 20,000 troops, by General Grant and Banks. September 5, crossed the river to Algiers, on the 6th, took cars for Bayou Boeuf, where arrived the morning of the 7th.

September 16, marched to Brashear City on Berwick Bay. September 26, crossed Berwick Bay to Berwick City. October 3, started with an expedition under General Franklin up the Teche Bayou, at Camp Bisland, that night received orders to report to General A.L. Lee, chief of cavalry, Department of Gulf, at Algiers, La. October 6 took the boat to Brashear, and cars to Algiers, arriving there on the morning of October 7.

The Regiment having been again mounted, on October 11, returned by cars to Brasheaar, crossed the bay and started on the march. October 12, marched to Franklin, La. 13th, New Iberia. October 14, rejoined the main force and our Army Corps (Thirteenth.) October 15, passed Vermillionville, having a heavy skirmish, and at night reached "Carrion Crow Bayou." October 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20, scouting and skirmishing. October 18, Colonel Fonda assigned to the command of the Brigade composed of the One Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Mounted Infantry, Second Illinois, Fourteenth New York and First Louisiana Cavalry. October 21, marched to Opelousa, skirmishing all the way. October 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28 and 30, scouting and skirmished with the rebels. November 1, moved back to Bayou Bourbent, or Carrion Crow Bayou, or Grand Goteau, as it is known. November 2, heavy skirmishing . November 3, in the battle of Carrion Crow Bayou, or as sometimes called Grand Goteau, in which our forces lost two regiments and a battery, and about 108 to 150 men killed and wounded.

On the 5th, reached Vermillion Bayou. On the 7th, re-brigaded with Second and Third Illinois Cavalry under command of Colonel Fonda. November 11, battle near Vermillionville, in which lost severely. November 15, moved to New Iberia. November 22 and 23, on a scout to Vermillion Bayou, heavy fight and captured 100 prisoners. December 2 and 3, scout to St. Martinsville, heavy skirmish and took some prisoners. Remained at New Iberia taking part in daily scouts and skirmishing until December 18, when received orders to march to Donaldsonville, La. On December 23, halted at General Bragg's plantation, at night camped on Senator Pugh's plantation--sorry the gentlemen were not at home--but entertained ourselves with the delicacies thereof, reached Donaldsonville on the Mississippi December 24. January 3 to 7, 1864, the Regiment was transferred to Port Hudson. For some time the Regiment was without tents or shelter, in the mud, rain and snow, and suffered intensely, remained here doing outpost duty and scouting andskirmishing almost daily, until July 3. January 12, on a scout, had a skirmish, and captured a number of prisoners. January 21, received the first tents had since last August. February 10, after a fight captured Jackson, La., with some prisoners and much property. February 16, had a skirmish. February 22, a raid to Bayou Sara and a skirmish. March 3, Lieutenant Colonel Logan, with a detachment, went to Baton Rouge, and on the way had a skirmish, and Colonel Fonda with a detachment of the One Hundred and Eighteenth and the Third Illinois Cavalry made a raid to Jackson, La., and had a severe fight. March 26, detachments of the Regiment had skirmishes; Company D, Captain Brown commanding, were entirely surrounded by rebels, but cut their way out taking some prisoners. March 28, 30, April 1 and 5, had scouts and skirmishes. Early in April Lieutenant Colonel Logan, with about 150 men from the One Hundred and Eighteenth and Third Illinois Cavalry, crossed the Mississippi River to superintend the construction of telegraphic lines to Red River, made a scout to Bayou Gross Tete, encountered a largely superior rebel force, and after a determined saber charge had a hand-to-hand fight, routed the rebels, killing and wounding a large number, captured a large quantity of ammunition, stores, etc., captured more prisoners than he had men in his command. April 7, Captain Shaw with 100 men of the One Hundred and Eighteenth and Third Illinois Cavalry and one gun of a New York battery were attacked by 600 rebels, surrounded, and three time cut off from camp. After a desperate fight they succeeded in cutting their way out and reached camp with a loss of only 15 men and the gun.

May 13, 1864, Major R. W. McClaughry appointed Paymaster, U.S.A.

May 15, had a several hours fight with a large force of rebel cavalry, in which they killed and wounded several, and recaptured some prisoners they had before taken. Kept up the telegraph to the mouth of Red River until the failure of the Banks expedition, and while so doing companies A, B and F were on May 3d, cut off by the rebels, and relieved by the gunboat General Bragg.

June 13 and 17, had skirmishes.

July 3, moved to Baton Rouge, and were re-brigaded with the Sixth Missouri, Fourteenth New York and Second Louisiana Cavalry, under command of Colonel Fonda.

August 24th to 27th, with the command of General A. L. Lee, went to Clinton, La., on which we were fighting parts of two days and all one night, having a battle at the Comite River; and on the 26th, repeatedly charged the rebel column, fighting for miles.

September 4, marched to Doyal's Plantation, and September 7, to Hermitage plantation, opposite Donaldsonville, to relieve the Eleventh New York Cavalry. From here scouted the surrounding country almost daily, and fought bushwackers and captured many.

September 14, October 2, 14 and 24, had skirmishes.

November 12th, 200 of the Regiment, under Captain Evans, reported to General Lee, at Baton Rouge, and on the 15th, left with his command on a raid to Liberty, Miss. Part of the Regiment went with a detachment to Summit, on the Jackson and N.O.R.R., having a severe skirmish, and burning depot and cotton. A party went with a detachment to Brookhaven, had a fight, re-captured cannon taken from Captain Shaw, on April 7, and took many prisoners, and the remainder were in battle with General Lee, at Liberty.

November 19, returned to Baton Rouge. November 21, having been gone some seven days, marched 200 miles, and with other forces captured one cannon and over two hundred prisoners, and fought five of the seven days.

November 24, moved from Hermitage to Baton Rouge. November 27, left on an expedition under General Davidson, which marched across the Amite River, past Greenville Springs, Greensburg,Tanglpahoe, across Tanglpahoe and Techfaw River, through Columbia and Bogue Chitto, Mississippi, over Pearl River, near Augusta, Alabama, across Red and Black Creeks, and reached West Pascagoula, on Mississippi Sound, December 12. During several days of this march, had skirnishes. Returned by vessel to New Orleanss, and by boat, to Baton Rouge, on December 27, 1864. From this time to May 22, doing out-post duty, and almost daily scouts into the surrounding country, with frequent skirmishes with the rebels.

February 25, Lieutenant Colonel Logan, with the Regiment, made an expedition west of the Mississippi River. March 1 to 10, in an expedition under General Bailey, to Olive Branch, Louisiana. May 22, 1865, by order, turned the horses over to the Post Quartermaster, and from that time until October 1, remained on provost duty at Baton Rouge.

Colonel Fonda commanded a Cavalry Brigade from October, 1863, until May, 1865. June 28, 1865, he was Breveted Brigadier General, and assigned to the command of the District of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which command he held until October, 1865.

In September, 1865, almost the entire Regiment had the "breakbone fever," and at one time, less than a hundred men and officers being able to do duty.

October 1, 1865, mustered out by Lieutenant E. M. Schuyven, First New Orleans Volunteers.

October 2, embarked on steamer W. R. Carter, for the North. Reached Cairo, Illinois, October 8, St. Louis, Missouri, October 9, thence by railroad to Camp Butler, October 10, 1865, where the Regiment was mustered in November 7, 1862. Were paid off by Paymaster Major Holbrook, on October 13, 1865, and the Regiment thence disbanded and forever seperated.

The number of battles, or days of battles, in which the Regiment or a considerable portion was engaged amounts to over forty. The number of skirmishes in which the Regiment or a detachment took part, outside of mere picket skirnishing, is over sixty; making over one hundred days in which some portion of the Regiment was engaged with the enemy.

The movements by railroad of the Regiment, aggregate some four hundred miles; by steamboat and vessel 3,300 miles, and the marches of the Regiment, as a body, irrespective of what would be termed "scouts," or little expeditions of the Regiment or detachments thereof, about 2,000 miles, making a distance traveled by the Regiment of over 5,700 miles.

The Regiment was mustered in to the service with 800 men and officers; received 283 recruits, making a total of 1,103; mustered out October 1, 1865, 523. The losses are as follows: 267 resigned and discharged for disability; 176 died; 63 missing; 17 killed in battle; 1 dishonorably discharged; 2 accidentally killed; 1 lost at sea; 2 drowned; 1 committed suicide; 7 absent at muster; 3 discharged by the President; 1 dismissed the service, and 25 transferred to other branches of the service, leaving 14 unaccounted for. This statement does not include 36 mustered under cooks, and 25 unassigned recruits who never reached the Regiment.


 

Captain Henry L. Field, 124th Illinois Infantry CDV

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An armed image of Captain Henry L. Field of the 124th Illinois Infantry.  Field musteresd inSeptember 1862 and mustered out August 1865 after being promoted to Major a couple of months before.  The image has Field seated, holding his sword.  You can see his gauntlets and his sash and sword belt.  Written on the back of the image in period ink is "As Ever Your True Friend, Henry L. Field, Co. C, 124th Ill. Inf. - Isaac Haire & Family".  Please note a small part of the photograph is missing on the left side of the image.  It does not take away from Field's image any. 
 

The One hundred and twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry was a representative, self-raised Regiment, recruited from Henry, Kane, McDonough, Sangamon, Jersey, Adams, Wayne, Cook, Putnam, Pike, Mercer and Christian Counties. August 27, 1862, the first company went into camp at Camp butler, near Springfield. Six days later all were in camp, and the field officers chosen. September 10th it was mustered into the United States service for three years, by Lieutenant F. E. DeCourcey.

October 6th, left for the front which was found at Jackson, Tennessee, at 3 A.M. The 9th. Was assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Army Corps, consisting of the Twentieth, Thirty-first, Forty-fifth and One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois and the Twenty-third Indiana, commanded by Colonel C. c. Marsh, of the Twentieth Illinois, General John A. Logan commanding the Division and General J. B. McPherson the Corp. With this organization the Regiment remained till April 5, 1864. In the crisp autumn air and lovely camp at Jackson the foundations largely laid for all the distinction it afterwards achieved.

Left Jackson November 2nd, to participate in the movement under General Grant, via Bolivar and Lagrange, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Abbeville and Oxford, Mississippi , to the rear of Vicksburg. Returned from the Yacoma upon the burning of the depot of supplies at Holly Springs, and after some time spent in guarding the Memphis and Charleston railroad, reached Memphis January 21, 1863.

A month later was a part of the command which moved down the Mississippi to Lake Providence, Louisiana, General I. N. Haynie being then in command of the Brigade.. After two months of inactivity was a part of the force moving from Milliken's Bend, April 25th, upon what proved to be the final Vicksburg campaign, General John E. Smith having succeeded General Haynie, who had gone home sick. April 30th, crossed the Mississippi from DeSchroo's plantation in Louisiana, to Bruinsburg in Mississippi, on the gunboat Mount City.

May 1st, after a rapid and hot march of about twelve miles, the Regiment received its first baptism of fire in bearing a part in the battle of Thompson's Hills, or Port Gibson . May 12th it bore an important part in the battle of Raymond, May 14th it was at the capture of Jackson and May 16th it did noble service at the battle of Champion Hills, capturing more men from the forth-third Georgia, after killing its Colonel and Major, than its own ranks numbered. It also killed most of the men and horses of a battery, really capturing the guns. The loss of the Regiment in this action was sixty-three killed and wounded.

The morning of May 19th crossed the Big Black and moved on Vicksburg. Was in the fearful charge of May 22nd, and occupied the extreme advance position gained that day, during the whole of the siege. It was just to the right of the Jackson road, upon which and the covered way subsequently dug, the left of the regiment rested, and is said to have been the nearest camp to the enemy's works. It was immediately in front of the fort which was mined-in large part by men of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth--and blown up June 15th and July 1st. At the first explosion the Regiment lost forty-nine men in killed and wounded in what was called the "Slaughter Pen," being ordered into the crater formed by the explosion, two companies at a time for half an hour, all day of the 26th.

General Smith having been assigned to the command of a Division, General M. D. Leggett, formerly Colonel of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, assumed command of the First Brigade, June 2nd.

On the 4th of July, the Regiment shared with the First Brigade in the honor of first entering the captured city and helping to swell the shout that arose as the Forty-fifth Illinois ran out its colors from the cupola of the court house.

From August 21 to September 2, was absent on an expedition to Monroe, La. under General J. D. Stevenson, General Logan being in command of the Post Vicksburg.

From October 14 to 20, was absent on an expedition in force against Loring, Wirt Adams and others to Brownsville and the Bogue Chitto Creek. Skirmished considerable but the enemy retreated.

November 7 the Brigade broke camp in Vicksburg, where its camp had been since the surrender, and removed to Big Black, 11 miles east. The 13th, General Logan took his farewell of his old fighting Third Division, to the regret of all, and was subsequently succeeded by General Leggett, the First Brigade being commanded by General M. F. Force. In December Colonel Sloan was dismissed the service, and Lieutenant Colonel J. H. Howe subsequently commanded the Regiment.

January, 1864, was rendered memorable in the history of the Regiment by its winning an "Excelsior" prize banner, which General Leggett Signalized his assuming command by tendering to the best drilled and finest Regiment in the Division. The three Brigades drilled separately, on the 29th of January the First Brigade, the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth winning; on the 21st the Second Brigade, the Seventy-eighth Ohio winning; on the 22nd the Third Brigade, the Seventeenth Illinois winning. On the 23rd the three victorious regiments drilled, and the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth won handsomely, the award being unanimous by the committee. General McPherson presented the banner. The Regiment bore the banner in triumph till the 5th of April following, including the famous Meridian raid under General Sherman from February 3 to March 4, or upwards of 300 miles marching in the face of the enemy, and much of the time under fire, proving by its good behaviour and bravery in the field, as well as by its bearing upon drill and parade, its right to the proud distinction of being the "Excelsior" Regiment of the noble Third Division. April 5, through a reorganization effected in veteranizing, the Regiment found itself outside of the Third Division, to which the banner was to belong, according to the terms understood in drilling for it, and so surrendered the proud trophy to Colonel Scott, temporarily commanding the Division. But the banner was never afterwards borne by any command. The One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois was the only "Excelsior" Regiment of that famous old Division.

The 5th of April, 1864, the Regiment moved to Vicksburg again, where its camp remained till February 26, 1865. Much of that time was passed on provost duty, from which a little relief was found in an expedition of eighteen days in May, under General McArthur, to Benton and Yazoo City, and one of nine days in July, under General Slocum, to Jackson, in both of which some considerable service was seen and loss sustained.

October 13 it went up the river, ultimately as far as Memphis. But nothing noteworthy occurred, and the 26th found it back in camp and on provost duty again.

February 25, 1865, after a stay in Vicksburg and vicinity of nearly two years, found the Regiment on the steamer Grey Eagle, bound for New Orleans with orders to report to General Canby. This was done the 27th, and followed by other orders to report to General A. J. Smith, below the city, for duty in the field.

March 11 embarked on the steamship Guiding Star, and March 16 debarked at Fort Gaines, on Dauphine Island, Ala.

Were assigned with the Eighty-first and one Hundred and Eighth Illinois and the Eighth Iowa, to the Third Brigade, Colonel J. L. Geddes, of the Eighth Iowa commanding, of the Third Division, commanded by General E.A. Carr, of the Sixteenth Army Corps, under General A. J. Smith; moving with the Thirteenth Army Corp, command by General Gordon Granger and a force under General F. Steele, against the defenses of Mobile, all under command of General E. R. S. Canby.

March 21 crossed the bay, and on the 22nd debarked on Fish River and moved on Spanish Fort. Shared actively in the investment on the 27th and the siege which followed, the Third Brigade constituting the extreme right of the investing line, and being exposed not only tot he direct fire from the enemy's works in front, but to an enfilading fire from batteries Huger and Tracy, and gunboats in the river above. Bore a conspicuous part in the brilliant attack on the enemy's extreme left on the night of April 8, which terminated the siege, was among the first to enter the works, captured several guns and many prisoners, swept up to the Old Fort in the darkness, reaching it before midnight, and was shelled by the Union Fleet before the change of occupation was known.

Started for Montgomery, Ala., April 12, reaching it on the 25th, and going immediately upon provost duty, Colonel Geddes commanding Post, and Colonel Howe the Brigade.

The 16th of July left for home via the Alabama River and railroad to Vicksburg, passing through Meridian, Jackson, the battle ground of Champion Hills, and the old camps on the Big Black. On the 28th of July left Vicksburg on the good steamer Ida Handy, and on the 3rd of August reached Chicago in company with the Seventy-sixth Illinois, Colonel Busey commanding. On the 16th of August, eleven days less than three years since the first company went into camp at Springfield, the Regiment was mustered out at Camp Douglas.

Colonel Howe's history of the battle flag of the Regiment, stated that it had been borne 4,100 miles, in the 14 skirmishes, 10 battles and 2 sieges of 47 days and nights, and 13 days and nights respectively, and so had been under fire eighty-two days and sixty nights; the distance not including that from Montgomery to Chicago.

The Regiment was one of the most fortunate in the service. It always obeyed orders, taking and holding every position to which it was assigned unflinchingly. Regiments by its side sustained fearful losses in officers and men while its numbers wee comparatively intact. One officer alone was killed in the service, and he was sitting in his tent off duty when struck, at the siege of Vicksburg. Two others resigned from wounds, five were captured when detailed on a scout, four of whom did not live to return, and one hundred and thirty-seven men died of disease. Very many others, officers and men, were wounded and some seriously, but they were not lost to the Regiment. The Regiment never was repulsed, never retreated a step in the face of a foe and never lost a prisoner in action.

The following from the pen of General M. D. Leggett, was written in January, 1886, and is thought worthy of a place in the closing of this history.


"As to the Excelsior Banner, it is due to the members of the Third Division that I should tell them all I know about it. When we went into the Atlanta campaign we sent all our surplus and unnecessary baggage back to Nashville for storage, in order to lighten our transportation. With such baggage the Excelsior Banner went. At the time of the siege of Nashville, in December, 1861, this baggage had its location changed and was lost, but was not captured by the enemy. I caused an exhaustive search to be made for it in the spring of 1865, but without success. If I could have found this Excelsior Banner, I should have sent it to Colonel John H. Howe, of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois. This was a splendid Regiment and splendidly officered, and deservedly earned the banner after a severe struggle. To be the best drilled and best disciplined Regiment in the old Third Division of the Seventeenth Corps, was honor enough. This was Logan's Division and McPherson's Corps up to the fall of Vicksburg, and no troops did more hard marching and hard fighting. It may be truthfully said of them, they were never driven from a position, and never attempted to take a position and failed."
Signed M.D. Leggett

Unidentified Union Captain CDV

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A nice shot of a Union Captain with a focused stare.  He looks like the photographer was a Confederate!  Unfortunately, there is no backmark on this one.


New York Armed Infantry Officer CDV

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A nice image of an armed infnatry officer.  The officer is wearing gauntlets and an overcoat.  He is holding his kepi and has his sword hanging on his sword belt.  The backmark is "C.W. Van Alstine, Photographist, Potsdam, N.Y.".


Armed Union Cavalry Corporal CDV with Painted Backdrop

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A really nice image of an armed Union cavalry corporal.  The image is of a full standing cavalry corporal.  He has his pistol in his holster and his cavalry saber is by his side.  THe back drop is painted with a tent, a camp stool. and soldiers in the backgraound.  The backmark on the image is "Alexander, Photographer, Fairfax C.H., Va.  -  Branch Saloons, Vienna and Prospect Hill, Va.".

Brevet Brigadier General Samuel R. Thomas CDV - 27th Ohio Infantry

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A nice image of Brevet Brigadier General Samuel R. Thomas with a Vicksburg backmark.  Thomas mustered in the 27 Ohio Infantry in August 1861 and was discharged for promotion October 1863.  He was promoted to Lt. Colonel of the 63rd U.S. Colored Troops in October 1863.  In January, 1864 he was promoted to Colonel of the 64th U.S. Colored Troops.  He was promoted Brevet Brigadier General in March 1865. 
 

The 27th Ohio Infantry was organized at Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio July 15 through August 18, 1861 and mustered in for three years service under the command of Colonel John Wallace Fuller.

The regiment was attached to Army of the West and Department of the Missouri, to February 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Mississippi, to April 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the Mississippi, to November 1862. 1st Brigade, 8th Division, Left Wing, XIII Corps, Department of the Tennessee, to December 1862. 1st Brigade, 8th Division, XVI Corps, to March 1863. 4th Brigade, District of Corinth, Mississippi, 2nd Division, XVI Corps, to May 1863. 3rd Brigade, District of Memphis, Tennessee, 5th Division, XVI Corps, to November 1863. Fuller's 4th Brigade, 2nd Division, XVI Corps, to March 1864. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, XVI Corps, to September 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, XVII Corps, to July 1865.

The 27th Ohio Infantry mustered out of service at Louisville, Kentucky on July 11, 1865.

Detailed service

Left Ohio for St. Louis, Mo., August 20, then moved to Mexico, Mo., and duty on the St. Joseph Railroad until September 12. March to relief of Col. Mulligan at Lexington, Mo., September 12–20. Fremont's advance on Springfield, Mo., October 15-November 2, 1861. March to Sedalia, Mo., November 9–17. Duty there and at Syracuse until February 1862. Expedition to Milford December 15–19, 1861. Blackwater, Mo., December 18. Moved to St. Louis, Mo., February 2, 1862, then to Commerce, Mo. Siege operations against New Madrid, Mo., March 3–14. Picket affair March 12. Siege and capture of Island No. 10, Mississippi River, and pursuit to Tiptonville March 15-April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13–17. Moved to Hamburn Landing, Tenn., April 18–22. Action at Monterey April 29. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnaissance toward Corinth May 8. Occupation of Corinth and pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Duty at Corinth until August. Battle of Iuka September 19. Reconnaissance from Rienzi to Hatchie River September 30. Battle of Corinth October 3–4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5–12. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November 2, 1862 to January 12, 1863. Expedition to Jackson December 18, 1862. Action at Parker's Cross Roads December 30. Red Mound or Parker's Cross Roads December 31. Duty at Corinth until April 1863. Dodge's Expedition to northern Alabama April 15-May 8. Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Duty at Memphis, Tenn., until October, and at Prospect, Tenn., until February 1864. Atlanta Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8–13. Sugar Valley, near Resaca, May 9. Near Resaca May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14–15. Advance on Dallas May 18–25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kennesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kennesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2–5. Ruff's Mills July 3–4. Chattahoochie River July 6–17. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25–30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy's Station September 2–6. Duty at Marietta until October. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 3–26. March to the sea November 10. Montieth Swamp December 9. Siege of Savannah December 10–21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April 1865. Reconnaissance to Salkehatchie River, S.C., January 20. Salkehatchie Swamp February 3–5. River's Bridge, Salkehatchie River, February 3. Binnaker's Bridge February 9. Orangeburg February 11–13. Columbia February 16–17. Juniper Creek, near Cheraw, March 3. Battle of Bentonville, N.C., March 20–21. Occupation of Goldsboro and Raleigh. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June, and duty there until July.
 
 

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