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Captain George Puterbaugh - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice image of Captain George Puterbaugh of the 47th Illinois Infantry.  Puterbaugh is wearing his caped overcoat in this image.  Written under the image in period ink is "Capt Geo Puterbaugh - 47th Ills Vols".  There is no backmark.  Puterbaugh was commision a 1st Lieutenant in August 1861.  He was promoted Captain of Company "E" in September 1862.  He mustered out in October 1864.  

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


Lt. Christopher C. Gilbert - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice image of Lt. Christopher C. Gilbert of the 47th Illinois Infnatry.  Gilbert mustered as Corporal of Company "C" in August 1861.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in August 1862 and to 1st Lieutenant in December 1863.  He mustered out in October 1864.  Written in period ink under the photograph is "Truly Yours, Christopher C. Gilbert, 2nd Lieut. - 47" Ills. Infty.".  There is no backmark.

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


1st Lieutenant Thomas Gray - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A great ink signed image of 1st Lieutenant Thomas Gray of the 47th Illinois Infantry.  Written in period ink under the image is "Your Friend - Thomas Gray 2nd Lt. Co. H, 47th Ills Infantry Vol".  There is no backmark.  Gray mustered in as 1st Sergeant of Company "H" in August 1861.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in June 1862 and to 1st Lieutenant in January 1864.  He mustered out in October 1864.

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


Sgt. John Puterbaugh - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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John Puterbaugh mustered in in August 1861 as Sergeant of "E" Company.  He mustered out in October 1864.  The image has Puterbaugh in a frock coat.  Written under the image in period ink is "Sgt. Puterbaugh - Co. "E", 47th Ills Vols".  There is no backmark.

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


Captain George Kinnear - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice, clean image of Captain George Kinnear of the 47th Illinois Infantry.  Kinnear was mustered in August 1861 and was commisioned 2nd Lieutenant of Company B at the end of August 1861.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in May 1863 and to Captain of Company F in August 1863.  He mustered out in October 1864.  Written in perid ink on the front of the image is "Yours Truly, Geo. Kinnear - Capt 47th Ill Inf".  The backmark on the image is "Photographed By T.E. Hanbury, Clay Gallery, Clay Building, Main Street, Memphis". 

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


Captain John M. Brown - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice image of Captain John M. Brown of the 47th Illinois Infantry.  Brown mustered in COmpany K of the 47th Illinois Infantry in October 1861 as 1st Sergeant.  He was commisioned Lieutenant in June 1862 and promoted to Captain in October 1862.  He mustered out in October 1864.  The backmark on the image is "H.A. Balch's Star Photographic Gallery, 221 Main Street, Memphis, Tenn.".   Written on the back of the image in period ink is "Truly Yours - Capt. J.M. Brown - Wyoming, Ills".

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


Captain Edward E. Toby - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A great image of Captain Edward E. Toby of the 47th Illinois Infantry.  Toby was commisioned 2nd Lieutenant in December 1861.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in November 1862 and was promoted to Captain in July 1863.  He was dishonorably discharged in October 1864.  Written on the front of the image in period ink is "Capt Toby - 47th Ills Vols".  There is no backmark.

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


Major Royal Omstead - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A neat image of Major Royal Omstead of the 47th Illinois Infantry with a great period ink identification!  The image is a bust image with "Lt Omstead - 47th Ills Vol "D" Company" written under the photograph.  There is no backmark.  Omstead enlisted as a sergeant in August 1861 in "D" Company, 47th Illinois Infantry.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant of "D" Company in December 1862.  In October 1864 he was promoted to Captain and in May 1865 he was promoted to Major.

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.


Lt. Joseph P. Goodwin - 47 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A nice ink signed image from the 47th Illinois Infantry.  Joseph P. Goodwin mustered in on August 18, 1861 as a private.  He was promoted to Corporal in February, 1864 and to 2nd Lieutenant on May 19, 1865.  There is no backmark.  Written on the front of the image in period ink is "Joseph P. Goodwin - 2nd Lieut. - Co. A - 47 Ill".
 

SERVICE - Moved from Jefferson City, Mo., to Otterville, Mo., December 22, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to Commerce, Mo., February 2. Operations against New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, Mississippi River, February 28-April 8. New Madrid March 5. Point Pleasant March 7. Action and capture of Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Action at Farmington, Miss., May 9. Near Corinth May 28. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Moved to Rienzi July 3, and duty there till Augu§t 18. March to Tuscumbia, Ala., August 18-22. March to Clear Creek September 8-14. Reconnoissance to Iuka, Miss., and skirmish September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-14. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 2, 1862-January 10, 1863. March from Grand Junction to Corinth, Miss., January 8-14, 1863, thence to Ridgway Station January 26 and duty there guarding R. R. till March 12. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence to Duckport, La., March 12-April 1. Demonstration on Haines' and Snyder's Bluffs April 25-May 2. Movement to Jackson, Miss., via Grand Gulf May 2-14. Mississippi Springs May 13. Jackson May 14 and May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Satartia and Mechanicsburg June 2-8. Satartia June 4. Expedition from Young's Point to Richmond, La., June 14-16. Richmond, La., June 15. Advance toward Jackson, Miss., July 5. Guard duty at Black River Bridge till July 22. At Bear Creek till October. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 14-20; thence to LaGrange, Tenn., and guard Memphis & Charleston R. R., and scouting after Forrest till January 26, 1864. Skirmish at Saulsbury December 3, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 26-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. At Black River Bridge till February 23. March to Canton and return to Vicksburg February 23-March 7, Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Grand Ecore April 2. Campti April 3. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville, Cane River, April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Muddy Bayou May 2-6. Well's Plantation, near Alexandria, May 2-13, Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-24, thence to Memphis, Tenn., June 4-10. Action at Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6. Defeat of Marmaduke. Veterans on furlough till August. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., July 5-21. Near Camargo's Cross Roads July 13. Harrisburg, near Tupelo, July 14-15. Tishamingo (or Old Town) Creek July 15. Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Abbeville August 23. Non-Veterans muster out October 11, 1864. Mower's Expedition to Brownsville, Ark., September 2-10. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 4. Ordered to Chicago November 9, thence moved to Springfield, Ill., and to Louisville, Ky., December 3. Duty at Louisville and Bowling Green, Ky., till January 27, 1865. Moved to Eastport, Miss., via Nashville, Tenn., January 27-February 1, thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and at Selma till January, 1866.

Mustered out January 21, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 184 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.

 
 
 
 

Lt. George W. Bryans, 61st Illinois Infantry CDV

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A waist up image of Lieutenant George W. Bryans of the 61st Illinois Infantry.  Bryans enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant in December 1862.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in June 1863 and resigned in January 1865.  Written in period ink on the bottom of the front card is "Geo. W. Bryans - 61st Ill.".  The backmark is "From Brown's Gallery, corner of Main & Markham streets, Little Rock, ARK.".

The Sixty-first Infantry Illinois Volunteers was organized at Carrollton, Illinois, by Colonel Jacob Fry. Three full companies were mustered February 5, 1862. February 21, the Regiment, being still incomplete, moved to Benton Barracks, Missouri. Here a sufficient number of recruits joined to make nine full companies.

March 26, 1862, embarked for Pittsburg Landing. On arriving, March 30, were assigned to Brigade of Colonel Madison Miller, Eighteenth Missouri, Division of Brigadier General B. M. Prentiss.

April 6, 400 men were formed in line, in time to receive the first assault of the enemy, and stood their ground for an hour and a quarter, and until every other Regiment in the division had given way, and were then ordered to fall back. Upon retiring from this position, the Regiment was complimented by General Prentiss for its gallant stand. It was then ordered to support a battery of the first Missouri Artillery, and at one o'clock P. M. ordered to the support of General Hurlbut--coming to his support at a very critical moment, and maintaining his line until relieved by a fresh Regiment, and when its ammunition was entirely exhausted. When the second line was broken, the Regiment retired in good order and took a position supporting the siege guns.

April 7, was in reserve. Loss, 80 killed, wounded and missing, including 3 commissioned officers.

April 18, was assigned to First Brigade, Third Division, Colonel L. F. Ross, Seventeenth Illinois, commanding Brigade.

April 28, Major Ohr took command of the Regiment, Colonel Fry being absent.

May 2, Brigadier General John A. Logan took command of the Division, and was succeeded, May 6, by Brigadier General Judah.

June 6, moved to Bethel, Tennessee, Colonel Haynie, Forty-eighth Illinois, taking command of Brigade. 16th, moved to Jackson. 17th, was in Ross' Brigade of Logan's (First) Division, and moved to Bolivar, Tennessee.

September 16, 1862, moved, via Jackson and Corinth, to Brownsville, Mississippi, on Memphis and Corinth Railroad. Returned to Bolivar, after the battle of Iuka, September 25.

October 10, Brigadier General M. Brayman was assigned to the Brigade, and Colonel Fry to command of post at Trenton, where, on the 20th of December, he was taken prisoner by General Forrest and paroled. The Brigade remained at Bolivar, General Brayman commanding post.

December 18, 1862, 240 men of the Regiment proceeded, by rail, to Jackson, and, moving out the Lexington road, under command of Colonel Engleman, with Forty-third Illinois and a detachment of cavalry took position at Salem Cemetery, and on the morning of 19th repulsed the enemy under Forrest, with three pieces of artillery, and on receiving reinforcements from General Sullivan, pursued the enemy some distance; after which, returned to Bolivar.

May 31, the Regiment being in the Sixteenth Army Corps, moved, via rail, to Memphis, and embarked for Vicksburg. June 3, arrived at Chickasaw Bayou, 4th, accompanied expedition up Yazoo River, landing at Satartia. Moved four miles out to Mechanicsburg, capturing some prisoners, 6th, moved to Haines' Bluff. June 20th, moved to Snyder's Bluff.

Lieutenant Colonel Fry having resigned, Major Ohr was promoted Lieutenant Colonel. July 17th, 1863, moved to Black River Bridge. 22d, returned to Snyder's Bluff. On 27th, moved to Helena, Arkansas. August 13, in Major General Steel's army, Colonel McLane, Forty-third Indiana, commanding Division, and Colonel Graves, Twelfth Michigan, commanding Brigade. Moved, via Clarendon, Duvall's Bluff, Brownsville, to Little Rock, skirmishing some with the enemy after leaving Brownsville, and arriving at Little Rock September 10, Remained at Little Rock.

The Regiment remained in Arkansas until August 14, 1864, being stationed most of the time at Little Rock and Duvall's Bluff. It did its full share of the hard, fatiguing and generally profitless marching that the troops composing that department made during that period, It participated in the combat at Clarendon, on the White River, June 26, 1864, which resulted in raising the Blockade of that river made by the rebel general, Joe Shelby. In the early part of the year 1864, enough of the men re-enlisted as Veterans to enable the Regiment to retain its organization as a Veteran Regiment. March 20, 1864, Company K joined the Regiment from Camp Butler, Illinois.

August 14, 1864, the Regiment started to Illinois, on veteran furlough, leaving Company K and the recruits and non-veterans in Camp at Duvall's Bluff, Arkansas. On the expiration of its veteran furlough, the regiment rendezvoused at Springfield, Illinois. It went from there to St. Louis. Owing to the pending invasion of Missouri by the rebels under General Price, the Regiment was halted at St. Louis, Companies B, D and G were detached from the Regiment and sent to Chester, Illinois, to guard the crossing of the river at that point. They remained there until October 14, when they joined the Regiment at St. Louis. The entire Regiment was then sent to Mexico on the North Missouri railroad, in the northeastern part of the State, and during the balance of that month was engaged in a series of hard marches after a gang of rebels who were operating in that part of the State, and finally chased them across the Missouri River and dispersed them. The Regiment then returned to St. Louis, and on November 6 left by steamer for Paducah, Kentucky, arriving there November 11. Left Paducah November 24. Went by steamer to Nashville, Tennessee, from thence on November 28, by rail to Murfreesboro, Tennessee. December 4, was engaged in the combat of Overall's Creek, three miles from Murfreesboro.

In addition to the casualties sustained by the Regiment in this action among the rank and file, Lieutenant Elijah B. Corrington, of Company F, a most excellent officer, was instantly killed, being struck by a musket ball in the breast.

December 7, the Regiment was engaged in the battle of Wilkinson's Pike, or the "Cedars," near Murfreesboro. It signalized itself by a gallant charge over the enemy's rail, and dirt breast works, capturing the colors of a Florida Regiment and a number of prisoners. Out of about 200 men engaged, the Sixty-first lost in killed and wounded about thirty in this affair.

December 12, the Regiment, numbering then about 175, with a small squad of dismounted cavalry, and one company of the First Michigan Engineers, was sent as escort of a train of cars destined to Stephenson, Alabama, and returned with rations for the troops at Murfreesboro. On the return, about 2 o'clock on the morning of December 15, about 8 miles out of Murfreesboro, the Regiment was attacked by an overwhelming force of rebels, under the command of Forrest. The rebel force aggregated fully 1,500 infantry and cavalry, and was also provided with a battery of artillery. They surrounded the train and tore up the track in front and rear to prevent escape, and opened up a galling fire of musketry and artillery. The train guard, numbering all told about 225 muskets, held the train until about 8 A. M., in the hope of reinforcements reaching them from Murfreesboro, but at that hour there being no sign of help, and their cartridges nearly exhausted, they abandoned the train, and cut their way out. Lieutenant Colonel Grass, commanding the Regiment, was captured, and over half the Regiment was killed, wounded and taken prisoners - Among others killed was Lieutenant Lorenzo J. Miner, of Company B, a most admirable young officer.

Major J. B. Nulton, who had successfully led the left wing of the Regiment through the rebel lines, reached a block house, about one-half of a mile north of the abandoned train, halted his command and upon being reinforced with a battery of artillery from Murfreesboro, marched back and recaptured the train, in time to prevent its destruction. Several regiments of infantry, under the command of Gen. Milroy, reached the scene of action soon thereafter and the enemy was put to flight; after which the road was repaired and the train, loaded with provisions, safely run into Murfreesboro.

This was the last severe action in which the Regiment was engaged. February 4, 1865, the non-veterans and recruits rejoined the Regiment from Duvalls Bluff, Arkansas.

March 21 the Regiment, under orders from Gen. Rosseau, moved to Franklin, Tennessee, and Maj. J. B. Nulton assumed command of the Post and Captain Daniel S. Keeley took command of the Regiment.

In the latter part of June, the recruits of the Eighty-third, Ninety-eighth and One Hundred Twenty-third Illinois infantry were transferred to the Sixty-first, filling its ranks nearly to the maximum, and Major J. B. Nulton was promoted to the rank of Colonel and Captain Daniel S. Keeley to that of Major.

While at Franklin, Tennessee, Col. Nulton, under orders from Gen. George H. Thomas, proceeded with a detachment of the Sixty-first Illinois to Hickman county, Tennessee, where he negotiated terms and received the surrender of the noted Duvall McNairy, together with his command numbering about one hundred fifty men rank and file.

September 8, 1865, the Regiment was mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee, and started home.

On September 27, 1865, at Camp Butler, near Springfield, Illinois, the boys received their final payment and discharge and "broke ranks" forever.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Major Clifford Stickney, 72 Illinois Infantry & US Signal Corps CDV

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A very nice image of Major Clifford Stickney of the 72nd Illinois Infantry and the U.S. Signal Corps.  Stickney enlisted as 2nd Lieutenant in August 1862.  He left the 72nd Illinois Infantry in March 1863 and moved to the U.S> Signal Corps.  In August 1865 he moved to the U.S. Volunteer Adjutant General Department.  He served in the U.S. Army until his death in 1867.  He was promoted 1st Lieutenant in March 1863.  He was breveted Captain in April 1865 and Major in August 1865.  Stickney is wearing a badge that consists of the 15th Corps arrow and the 2nd Corps clover.  The backmark on the image is "Churchill & Denison, No. 522 Broadway, Albany, N.Y.".  Written in period ink on the back is "To Caroline from Clifford".  A green 3 cent tax stamp is attached to the back of the card.
 
SERVICE - Duty at Cairo, Ill., till September 6, 1862. Moved to Paducah, Ky., September 6, thence to Columbus, Ky., September 17, and duty there till November 21. Expedition from Columbus to Covington, Durhamsville and Fort Randolph September 28 - October 5. Expedition to Clarkson, Mo., October 6. Expedition to New Madrid, Mo., October 21. Skirmishes at Clarkson, Mo., October 23 and 28. Moved to Moscow, Miss., November 21, and Join Quinby's Command. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 21 - December 30. Duty on line of the Memphis and Charleston R. R. till January 10, 1863. At Memphis, Tenn., till February 24. Yazoo Pass Expedition, by Moon Lake, Yazoo Pass and the Coldwater and Tallahatchie Rivers February 24 - April 8. Operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13 - April 5. Fort Pemberton near Greenwood March 11, 16, 25 - April 2 and 4. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., and guard duty from Milliken's Bend to New Carthage till April 25. Duty at Richmond, La., April 25 - May 10. Battle of Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18 - July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Mechanicsburg May 26 - ,June 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Moved to Natchez, Miss., July 12-13, and duty there till October 17. Action at St. Catherine's Creek July 28 and September 1. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., October 17, and Provost duty there till October 30, 1864. Expedition to Waterproof, La., January 29 - February 23, 1864. Waterproof February 14-15. Yazoo City Expedition May 4-21. Actions at Benton May 7 and 9. Vaughan May 12. Luce's Plantation May 13. Vaughan Station May 14. Expedition to Grand Gulf July 10-17. Port Gibson July 13. Grand Gulf July 16. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., October 30 - November 13, thence to Columbia, Tenn., November 13-21. Nashville Campaign November - December. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Spring Hill November 29. Battle of Franklin November 30. Skirmish near Nashville December 7. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Moved to Clifton, Ten;, thence to Eastport, Miss., and duty there till February 9, 1865. Moved to New Orleans, La., February 9-21, and duty there till March 12. Campaign against Mobile, Ala., and its defenses March 17 - April 12. Expedition from Dauphin Island to Fowl River Narrows March 18-22. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26 - April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Capture of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 14-25, and duty there till May 23. Moved to Union Springs, Ala., May 23, and duty there till July 19. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., July 19.

Mustered out August 7, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 79 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 145 Enlisted men by disease. Total 234.


Lt. Henry P. Ayers, 77 Illinois Infnatry CDV

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A great armed image of Lt. Henry P. Ayers of the 77th Illinois Infantry.  Ayers is in a frock coat holding his sword.  His slouch hat is on the table next to him.  Written in period ink on the back of the image is "Mr. Ayers - 77th Ill. Vol.".  The backmark is "Photographed by J. Thurlow, One door above Second National Bank, Main St.....Peroria.".  An orange 2 cent canceled stamp is on the back.  Ayers enlisted in August 1862 as a Corporal.  He was promoted to Sergeant Major and 1st Lieutenant during his Civil War experience.  He mustered out in July 1865.
 
The Seventy-seventh Illinois Infantry was organized at Peoria, Illinois and mustered into service on September 3, 1862. The men of this Regiment volunteered from: Companies A, Knox County, Company B-Putnam County, Company C-Woodford County, Company D-Marshall County, Company E-Peoria County, Company F-Peoria and Woodford counties, Company G-Peoria County, Company H-Woodford, Tazewell and Peoria counties, Company I-Peoria County and Company K-Peoria County. The Regiment was ordered to Cincinnati on October 4 and went into camp across the Ohio River at Covington, Kentucky. In November the Regiment marched south through Lexington to take possession of Richmond, Kentucky. Two weeks later they were ordered to Louisville and transported downriver to Memphis. December 20 they were transported further down the Mississippi River to the Yazoo River and up the Yazoo about ten miles where they disembarked and soon met the enemy guarding the rear of Vicksburg. After several days of skirmishing, the enemy works could not be carried and on January 2, 1863 the Union troops withdrew to Milliken’s Bend upriver on the Louisiana shore. On January 5, the Seventy-seventh sailed back up the Mississippi River to the White River and up the White River to the cutoff to the Arkansas River to Fort Hindman at Arkansas Post. Here on January 10 and 11 they met and defeated the enemy forces and planted the flag of the Seventy-seventh on the parapet.[2] Following the battle the Regiment returned to Young’s Point and remained there until March when they moved to Milliken’s Bend. In April the army marched to New Carthage crossed the Mississippi River at Bruinsburg and moved toward Port Gibson. A fight ensued on the march to Port Gibson but the rebel force was overcome and the town was taken. Further northward movement brought the Regiment to Champion Hills. Here on May 16 the rebel force was routed and the next morning the Seventy-seventh resumed its march toward Vicksburg. They next met the enemy at Big Black River and then at the Siege of Vicksburg.[3] After the fall of Vicksburg on July 4, the Regiment pursued the enemy toward Jackson, Mississippi where they took part in the siege and surrender of Jackson. In August the Regiment was ordered to New Orleans and in December was transported to Pass Cavello on the Texas Gulf and went into camp at DeCrow’s Point. They remained there until February 1864, returned to New Orleans and embarked on the Banks’ Red River campaign in March. On April 8, 1864 at Sabine crossroads, south of Mansfield, Louisiana, Confederate forces attacked the Union troops. The Seventy-seventh Illinois was sent forward to assist the cavalry and suffered severely in the defeat; their Colonel, Lysander Webb was killed and 176 other officers and men were killed, wounded and taken prisoner, leaving only 125 men in the Regiment. Following retreat down Red River the Regiment went into camp at Baton Rouge; in August the men were transported to Dauphine’s Island in Mobile Bay, fought at the capture of Forts Gaines and Morgan guarding Mobile Bay and returned to Morganzia above Baton Rouge on the Mississippi River. In October the Regiment moved to New Orleans for provost duty until March 1865[4] then was transported to Fort Morgan, Alabama to aid in the siege and capture of Spanish Fort, and Fort Blakely. On July 10, 1865 the Seventy-seventh Illinois Infantry was mustered out at Mobile, Alabama.[5],[6]

John C. Gregory, 81 Illinois Infnatry & Veteran Reserve Corps CDV

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A three quarter seated photograph of John C. Gregory of the 81st Illinois Infantry and the Veteran Reserve Corps.  Gregory is dressed in his four button sack coat and army issued pants.  Written in faint period ink on the front of the image is "John C. Gregory".  Written in modern ink is "E 81st Ill".  The backmark is "John Goldin & Co. - Photographers - Vignette Specialite - No. 4 Market Space - Pa. Ave. - Washington, D.C.".  Gregory was mustered in August 26, 1862 as a private.  He was transferred out on December 31, 1863 to the Veteran Reserve Corps where he served the rest of his Civil War military experience.  Obviously he was wounded but I do not know the date of the wounding or where.
 
 
The Eighty-first Illinois Infantry organized at Anna in Union County, Illinois and mustered into service August 26, 1862. The men were recruited from counties in southern Illinois as follows, Company A-from Perry County, Company B-from Jackson County, Company C-from Perry County, Company D-from Jackson County, Company E-from Union and Williamson counties, Company F-from Jackson County, Company G-from Williamson County, Company H-from Jefferson County, Company I-from Washington County and Company K-from Madison County. The Regiment was moved by rail to Cairo, Illinois on September 6 and on October 8 sailed downriver to Columbus, Kentucky and moved by rail to Humboldt, Tennessee for garrison duty. The Regiment left by rail on November 12 for LaGrange, Tennessee and remained there until November 29 when they began marching south into Mississippi. They had passed through Holly Springs and had reached Oxford, Mississippi when on December 21, they received word that Confederate General Van Dorn, in their rear, had captured the Union depot at Holly Springs and destroyed the supplies. This resulted in the retreat of the Union forces, including the Eighty-first Illinois, back to Memphis, arriving there January 19, 1863. On February 20 the Regiment broke camp and steamed down the Mississippi River to Lake Providence, Louisiana about 75 miles above Vicksburg, Mississippi. April 17 the Regiment moved further downriver to Milliken’s Bend, 20 miles above Vicksburg. The following day a call was made for volunteers to man supply transports to run the batteries at Vicksburg and Grand Gulf. Seven men of Company I were accepted and that night the transports ran the batteries with the sinking of the Tigress and Empire City and damage to others. April 25 the Regiment marched out of Milliken’s Bend, moved cross-county and on April 30 crossed the Mississippi River from Louisiana to Bruinsburg, Mississippi, several miles below Vicksburg. The next day the Eighty-first fought at Thompson’s Hill and pursued the retreating rebels through Port Gibson. May 3 the Regiment camped on the Big Black River south of Vicksburg. A week later the men marched toward Raymond and met and defeated the enemy there on May 12 then marched to Clinton, a town on the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad. Destruction of the railroad cut off all communications and supplies between Vicksburg and the remainder of the Confederacy. May 14 the Regiment was engaged in the battle and fall of Jackson, the Mississippi state capitol. Marching toward Vicksburg the Eighty-first fought at Champion Hill on May 16 and at Black River Bridge on May 17. By May 19 they were in the siege lines at Vicksburg; in the assault on Vicksburg, May 22, the Regiment lost 11 men killed and 96 wounded including the death of the Regimental commander, Colonel James J. Dollins. On July 4, 1863 Vicksburg surrendered and the Eighty-first Illinois was one of the Regiments assigned to garrison the city. The Regiment remained at Vicksburg until March 1864 but during that time participated in expeditions to Monroe, Louisiana, Bogue Chitto Creek and Sunny Landing, Arkansas. March 9, 1864 the Regiment departed Vicksburg on the tin-clad steamer Diana as part of the Red River Expedition. During that campaign the Eighty-first was engaged in the capture of Fort De Russey and Alexandria in the advance on Shreveport, Louisiana. However after the Union forces, under Banks, were defeated at Mansfield on April 8 the expedition retreated back downriver with actions at Pleasant Hill, Cloutierville,[1] Marksville Prairie, Bryce’s Plantation, Bayou Boeuf and Yellow Bayou. The Regiment landed back at Vicksburg May 24. On May 27 the Eighty-first was ordered to sail upriver to Memphis, Tennessee where they disembarked and marched southeast into Mississippi. In a battle near Guntown,[2] Mississippi on June 10 the Eighty-first engaged rebel forces under Forrest; although the Regiment captured a rebel flag[3] they were driven from the field and of 371 men in the Regiment, 9 were killed, 18 wounded and 126 taken prisoner.[4] ,[5] In August the Eighty-first moved to Duvall’s Bluff, Arkansas and scouted and skirmished throughout the State until September 17 when it joined in the pursuit of Confederate General Price in Missouri. Price having escaped the Regiment was ordered to Nashville, Tennessee and fought in the defeat of the Confederate army under Hood in the battle of Nashville on December 15 and 16, 1864. The Regiment joined in the pursuit of Hood into Mississippi and remained at camp in Eastport, Mississippi until February 1865. In May they joined the Atlanta campaign and fought at Kenesaw Mountain, Nickajack Creek, Chattahoochie River and in the siege of Atlanta. In the flanking movement south of Atlanta they fought at Jonesboro on August 25-30 and at Lovejoy Station August 31-September 1. After pursuit of Hood into north Georgia and Alabama the Regiment returned to Nashville and moved to New Orleans in February 1865. In March they moved to Mobile, Alabama and campaigned against Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely and Mobile and in April marched to Montgomery, Alabama and remained there until July. They moved to Chicago and were mustered out August 5, 1865.[6]
 
 

Lt. Samuel F. McDonald, 93 Illinois Infantry & Pioneer Corps CDV

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A very nice bust shot of Lt. Samuel F. McDonald of the 93rd Illinois Infantry and the Pioneer Corp of the 15th Corps.  Written in period ink on the front of the CDV under the photograph is "S F McDonald. A.A.Q.M. - Pioneer Corps - 3rd Div -15th A Corps".  McDonald was commisioned into the 93rd Illinois Infantry as a 2nd Lieutenant in October 1862.  He mustered out in June 1865.  As noted on the image he spent time in the Pioneer Corps of the 15th Army Corps during his war experience.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on July 27, 1863.

SERVICE.--Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. Tallahatchie March November 26-December 12, 1862. At Ridgway, Tenn., January to March, 1863. Moved to Lake Providence, La., March 3, thence to Helena, Ark., March 10. Expedition to Yazoo Pass by Moon Lake, Yazoo Pass and Coldwater and Tallahatchie Rivers March 13-April 5. Operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., April 13. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1 (Reserve). Battles of Raymond May 12; near Raymond May 13; Jackson May 14; Champion's Hill May 16; Big Black River May 17. Siege of Vicksburg May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Moved to Jackson, Miss,, July 13-15. Siege of Jackson July 15-17. At Vicksburg until September 12. Moved to Helena, Ark., September 12, thence to Memphis, Tenn., September 30. March to Chattanooga, Tenn., October 3-November 19. Operations on the Memphis and Charleston R. R. in Alabama October 20:29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hill November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Pursuit to Graysville November 26-27. Moved to Bridgeport, Ala., December 3. To Larkinsville, Ala., December 22, and to Huntsville, Ala., January 17, 1864. Duty there until June. Demonstration on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 23-25. Moved to Decatur, Ala., June 12, thence march to Stevenson, Ala., June 14-25. To Kingston, Ga., June 27-28, thence to Etowah and guard bridge and crossing until July 11. At Kingston until August 2. March to Allatoona August 2-3. Pursuit of Wheeler to Spring Place August 15-18. At Resaca and Allatoona until November. Battle of Allatoona October 5. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Salkehatchie Swamps, S. C., February 2-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. Columbia February 15-17. West's Cross Roads February 25 (Detachment). Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out June 23 and discharged at Chicago, Ill., July 7, 1865.
Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 147 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 142 Enlisted men by disease. Total 294.

 
 

James W. Scrimger, 94 Illinois Infantry CDV

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A civilian full standing photograph of James W. Scrimger of the 94th Illinois Infantry.  Scrimger enlisted as a Private in August 1862.  He was mustered out in July 1865.  THe backmark on this image is "Photographed By Scibird & Bro., Bloomington, Ills.".  There are two creases in this image but they don't greatly diminish the photograph.

This Regiment had its origin in the magnificent burst of enthusiasm which greeted Mr. Lincoln's call for more men, in the summer of 1862. It was organized, examined, inspected, mustered in and put into the field within ten days.

It was composed entirely of residents of McLean county, and was usually called "the McLean Regiment".

Largely through the exertions of the Hon. Isaac Funk and the Hon. Harrison Noble, the county authorities gave each enlisted man a bounty of fifty dollars, and also presented the Regiment with a magnificent stand of colors, costing five hundred dollars. Nearly all the Companies had as excess of men offered, and two Companies raised simultaneously for the purpose of joining the Ninety-fourth, were afterward mustered into other organizations. In several instances a father and two or three sons (in one case four) enlisted together, and there was a generous emulation who should do the most for the favorite organization.

The full strength at muster-in was 945, and 149 recruits afterwards joined, making a total of 1,094. It lost 11 men killed in battle, had 45 wounded, 157 died, and 161 were discharged.

The small percentage of loss, notwithstanding the active service and severe actions in which it participated, must be attributed to the rare skill displayed by Colonel McNulta in taking care of his men and preventing their unnecessary exposure in action, and to the very efficient medical staff, which was continually on the alert to secure the best sanitary regulations in camp, and assiduous in the care of the sick and wounded.

Colonel Orme being promoted to Brigadier General in November 1862, the command of the Regiment was practically held by Colonel McNulta during the entire term of service.

Leaving Bloomington August 25, 1862, it was quartered for two weeks in Benton Barracks, where it was brigaded with the Nineteenth Iowa and Twentieth Wisconsin, forming the Second Brigade of the Third Division of what was at that time called the "Army of the Frontier", and designed to operate in Missouri and Arkansas. The Brigade was commanded by Colonel Orme and the Division by General F. H. Herron, the whole being commanded by General J. M. Schofield. Afterwards the Division became attached to the Thirteenth Army Corps, under McClernand.

On September 10th, the Brigade was moved by rail to Rolla, Mo., and thence in a few days to Springfield, at that time upon the extreme front of the Union forces. Here six weeks were spent in the most assiduous company and battalion drills, the men being especially exercised in firing while lying down, and in the skirmish drill, in when they became remarkably proficient, and the results of which were very apparent when they came into action. The advantage of being able to deliver an accurate and rapid fire while lying down, and almost entirely protected by the slightest irregularity of ground, is obvious.

The territory lying south of Springfield was occupied by the Confederate General Hindman with a large force of troops, mostly irregular, which were suddenly concentrated about December 1st, and surrounded General Blunt at Cane Hill, in the northwest corner of Arkansas, and threatened him with annihilation. Upon receipt of intelligence of this occurrence, the Second and Third Divisions made a forced march of 120 miles in 90 hours, and on the 7th of December attacked the whole force of the enemy, fully 30,000 strong, advantageously posted at Prairie Grove, near Fayetteville, Ark.

Our troops numbered only about 4,000 men, the Second Division not having come up, yet they boldly attacked the enemy and "hammered" him until evening, when General Blunt broke through the small force which Hindman had left in his front, and, attacking the enemy on the flank, turned the fortunes of the day in our favor. In this engagement the Ninety- fourth held the extreme left of our line, and covered the road to Fayetteville by which the Second Division was coming to our assistance. Had they once given way, as several parts of the line did, at different times, before assaults of the enemy, the latter would have seized the road, cut off our reinforcements, and had us at his mercy.

Here the drill at Springfield proved its value. Scattered in a long, irregular line, lying flat on their faces, taking advantage of every stump, fence and irregularity of ground, the Regiment maintained so destructive a fire that no troops could be brought against them without being cut to pieces, while our men were comparatively unharmed. Colonel McNulta contributed largely to this result by riding constantly up and down the lines, urging the men to "lie close and fire low", utterly regardless of his own exposure. It was owing to this policy that our loss was so trifling -1 killed and 26 wounded-compared with regiments at our side who were no so well handled. The enemy retreated during the night, finding the Second Division coming up, and left us in possession of the field.

In about two weeks the Regiment took part in an expedition to VanBuren, on the Arkansas River, burning two Rebel steamers and making so imposing a display of strength that that part of the country was afterwards comparatively quiet. Returning through Missouri to near Rolla, the Regiment drilled and recruited until June 1863, when it was sent down the river to Vicksburg, where it was stationed below the city on the left of our line, and assisted in all the siege operations, terminating with the capture of that stronghold on the 4th of July. Here, again, the indefatigable McNultra was constantly among the men in the trenches, rapping them on the head when they needlessly exposed themselves, and keeping so sharp a lookout that, although exposed alternate days for two weeks to a hot fire in the trenches, and their camp almost constantly under the rage of the enemy's shells, the Regiment only sustained a loss of 1 man killed and 5 wounded, showing how much a prudent and sagacious commander can do in preventing needless sacrifice of life.

After the surrender, the Regiment was sent on an expedition up the Yazoo, and on July 24th went down the river again, making brief stop at Port Hudson, to Carrollton, six miles above New Orleans. In the month of September it was sent up to Morganzia, and made a reconnoissance through the swamps of that delectable region, without any especial results except undergoing a severe shelling, during which Colonel McNulta was knocked off his horse by a piece of shell, and received injuries which since have resulted in permanent disability.

On October 25th, the Ninety-fourth embarked for the Rio Grande, where, at Brownsville and in that vicinity, the men spent nine of the most miserable months of their enlistment, the monotony only being relieved by an occasional revolution upon the Mexican side of the river at Matamoras, during one of which they were called on to spend a night upon the streets in the city guarding the American Consul.

Under the policy of concentration inaugurated by General Grant upon assuming chief command, in July 1864, the Regiment was withdrawn from Texas, and during the first half of August took an active part in the siege of Fort Morgan, which surrendered on the 21st, after sustaining a most fearful bombardment from the fleet and mortars on shore. Another period of inaction following, only broken by a short expedition to Pascayoula, until the 17th of March, when the Brigade, as an independent command under Colonel Bertram, of the Twentieth Wisconsin, who reported directly to General Granger, moved up the east side of Mobile Bay to take part in the siege of Spanish Fort, the key to the city of Mobile. Here, as at Vicksburg, the Regiment held the extreme left of the line, and during thirteen days was constantly under fire, digging rifle pits, trenches and mines; and here, as at Vicksburg, the constant care of their Colonel brought them through this memorable siege with a loss of only 1 killed and 3 wounded.

Participated in the final assault, they had the honor of being the first to mount the walls of Fort Alexis, at 10 o'clock P.M., April 8, 1865.

After the fall of Mobile, which followed that of Spanish Fort, the Ninety-fourth was sent to Ship Island in charge of a large number of prisoners, after which they went into camp on the "shell road", below Mobile, until June 18th, when they moved to Galveston, Texas, and did garrison duty until their muster-out, on the 17th of July, the Regiment reaching Bloomington on the 9th of August, being received with a superb ovation.

The Ninety-fourth served just three years, marched 1,200 miles, traveled by railroad 610 miles and by steamer 6,000 miles, took part in nine battles, sieges and skirmishes.


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