Grand Army of the Republic
State Badges
1910 Pennsylvania Monument Dedication at Gettysburg Badge

Offered is a very nice badge worn at the Pennsylvania Monument dedication on Gettysburg battlefield.  The badge has a silver colored hanger with "Pennsylvania" written on it.  A blue ribbon is suspended from the hanger.  On the ribbon in gold ink is the likeness of the Pennsylvania Monument.  Written in the gold ink on the ribbon is "Mem.(Memorial), Gettysburg - Sept. 27, 1910".  A second metal hanger is attached tot he bottom of the ribbon.  Written on it is "Souvenir".  A round disk drop is attached to the second hanger.  On the front of the disk is the likeness of an armed Union soldier standing in front of tents.  On the back of the disk is the likeness of the Gettysburg monument which is in the National Cemetary.  Written around the monuments likeness is "In Memory of our Noble Dead".  The badge is approximately 4 3/4 inches tall and 1 1/2 inches wide.  The ribbon is solid on this badge.  Most of the time you find this badge with tearand separations in the ribbon but not this one!  

The State of Pennsylvania Monument is the largest monument on the Gettysburg battlefield. The tip of the sword of the statue of Winged Victory is 110 feet high. A staircase takes visitors to the roof of the monument, which offers a panoramic view of the battlefield.

The monument is made from North Carolina granite set over an iron and concrete frame. Sculptor Samuel Murray created the 7,500 pound statue of Winged Victory which stand on top of the dome; its metal came from melted down Civil War cannon. He also created the reliefs over each of the arches. The monument was dedicated on September 27th, 1910. The statues on each side of the arches were added after April of 1913.See the source imageFrom the inscriptions flanking the front entrance:

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
In honor of her sons who on this field fought for the Preservation of the Union July 1.2. & 3. 1863

Pennsylvania at Gettysburg
69 Regiments Infantry
9 Regiments Cavalry
7 Batteries Artillery
Total Present 34530
Killed and mortally wounded 1182
Wounded 3177 Missing 860


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $365.00 USD

1913 Gettysburg Indiana State Ribbon

Offered is a very hard to find 1913 Indiana state ribbon worn by Union veterans from the state of Indiana who atteneded the 1913 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, held in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  This hard to find ribbon is in crisp condition.  The ribbon is approximately 9 inches by 2 1/4 inches.  

The 1913 Gettysburg reunion was a Gettysburg Battlefield encampment of American Civil War veterans for the Battle of Gettysburg's 50th anniversary. The June 29–July 4 gathering of 53,407 veterans (~8,750 Confederate)[1] was the largest ever Civil War veteran reunion, and "never before in the world's history [had] so great a number of men so advanced in years been assembled under field conditions" (Chief Surgeon).[2]:60 All honorably discharged veterans in the Grand Army of the Republic and the United Confederate Veterans were invited, and veterans from 46 of the 48 states attended[3] (cf. Nevada).[citation needed] Despite concerns "that there might be unpleasant differences, at least, between the blue and gray"[4] (as after England's War of the Roses and the French Revolution),[5] the peaceful reunion was repeatedly marked by events of Union–Confederate camaraderie.[6] President Woodrow Wilson's July 4 reunion address summarized the spirit: "We have found one another again as brothers and comrades in arms, enemies no longer, generous friends rather, our battles long past, the quarrel forgotten—except that we shall not forget the splendid valor."

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $300.00 USD

15 New Jersey Infantry 1906 Badge

Offered is a great badge worn at the reunion of the 15th New Jersey Infantry in 1903 held in Morristown, New Jersey.  This badge is a Guest badge worn by people other than the veterans.  The badge has a gold colored ribbon as its base.  A wonderful U.S. flag is applied and stitched on the upper part of the badge.  Written on the badge in silver color ink is “Guest – 27th Annual Reunion 15th N.J.V.V.A. – Morristown, N.J. – October 18, 1906”.  The badge is approximately 5 7/8 inches tall and approximately 2 inches wide.  The badge was made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted by the makers label attached to the back of the ribbon.

15th New Jersey Infantry

Regimental History
Fifteenth Infantry. — Cols., Samuel Fowler, William H. Penrose; Lieut. -Col., Edward L. Campbell; Majs., James M. Brown, Daniel R. Burrell, Lambert Boeman, Ebenezer W. Davis. This regiment was organized at Flemington in July and Aug., 1862. Three companies were recruited in Sussex county, two in Warren, two in Hunterdon, two in Morris and one in Somerset, and all were composed of men of superior physical strength and capacities for endurance. The regiment was mustered into the U. S. service on Aug. 25, and on the 27th left for Washington, numbering 925 officers and men, Col. Samuel Fowler commanding. At Bakersville, Md., it was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 6th army corps, and henceforth participated in the hardships, battles and triumphs of the Army of the Potomac. At the battle of Fredericksburg the regiment was stationed along the line of the railroad, keeping up a musketry fire and now and then charging upon the enemy. The total loss in the regiment here was about 30. Its next engagement was at Chancellorsville, where it charged gallantly through a thick wood, found the enemy advantageously posted behind a wall and ditch, but with a royal courage the 15th bravely faced all obstacles and maintained the fight until 8 p. m. when, owing to a want of concert of action, it was compelled to fall back, having lost 150 in killed, wounded and missing. The regiment was present at the battle of Gettysburg, though not actively engaged. Then following the enemy it came upon his rear-guard near Fairfield on July 5, and a sharp skirmish followed. The pursuit was continued for several days and near Hagerstown there was a skirmish in which 2 men of the regiment were wounded, 1 by a bullet through the foot, and Jacob O. Burdett through both thighs. The regiment marched with the army to Centerville and back again to the Rappahannock ; was present, though not engaged, at the capture of Rappahannock Station ; and after the Mine Run movement went into winter-quarters 2 miles from Brandy Station. May 5, 1864, found it in the Wilderness and the sounds of battle where Warren had come into collision with Ewell's corps, soon brought the order hastening the 6th corps to his support. Several men of the regiment were wounded and Leonard Decker of Co. D was killed. On the following day the line was broken on the right and the enemy penetrated to the rear, but the men of the 15th held an advanced and isolated position till midnight, when, without loss they followed the rest of the army to a new line in the rear. By 10 a. m. on the 7th, the works on the new line had been made very strong, and though the enemy felt the line in front and drove in a part of the skirmish line, by which 3 men were wounded, and John Brogan of Co. A was killed, no real advantage was gained. About noon on May 8, the regiment reached the field of action at Spottsylvania Court House, meeting many of the 5th corps going in squads to the rear. On the following day it moved gallantly forward, charging at a double-quick, and had it been properly supported the victory must have been complete, but overwhelmed, it slowly fell back, having lost in all 101 men. However, it had performed one of the most gallant achievements of the campaign and in that thought the survivors found some compensation for their sufferings, as, exhausted and worn, they withdrew from the scene of combat. At noon of the 9th, the regiment again moved, marching to the right, but did not become actively engaged, though three companies were stationed on the skirmish line and the whole command was much exposed. On the 10th the regimental position was no less exposed, but the command bravely held its own against the onsets of the enemy, losing in all 20 men. On the 12th the regiment dashed through the abatis before the Confederate works, swept over a portion of the breastworks, which for a time it stoutly held, driving out the Confederates, or bayoneting those who tenaciously clung to the position. But the regiment was forced to fall back and when Col. Campbell gathered his shattered battalion only 75 were found. Forty bodies, or nearly one-fifth of the whole regiment, lay on the breastwork, in the ditch or on the narrow open space in front. From this time until May 24, the regiment was moved backward and forward, from the center to the left of the army, occasionally skirmishing with the enemy and losing a few men. It had broken camp on the 4th with 15 officers and 429 muskets, and was now reduced to 6 officers and 136 muskets. From May 21 to June 1 it was kept in motion most of the time with an occasional loss on the skirmish line, being present at the battle of the North Anna and other places of conflict. When the 6th corps charged at Cold Harbor 25 of the regiment were killed or wounded — Sergt.-Maj. A. V. Wyckoff being among the former. On a little hillock captured in this charge the regiment remained for the greater part of the next ten days, though from it many never came alive. On June 19 it reached the outer defenses of Petersburg, where it remained, with the exception of a march to Reams' station, until the night of July 9, when it proceeded to the James river and took steamer for Washington, going thence to the Shenandoah Valley. Nothing of particular importance occurred until Aug. 15, when it was assaulted at Strasburg and lost 9 men. On the 17th it skirmished all day through Newtown and Winchester, the brigade forming the rear-guard of the army. In this action the regiment lost 61 men in killed and missing. On the 21st the enemy assaulted the lines at Charlestown, whither the army troops had retired, and a number of men were lost. At the battle of the Opequan the regiment suffered severely, losing nearly 50 in killed and wounded. On the 21st the regiment had a skirmish with the enemy, in which 2 men were killed and 15 wounded. At Fisher's hill, whither Early had retreated, the brigade moved to the right and at 4 o'clock p. m. assaulted and captured the Confederate works, the regiment displaying great gallantry. It also performed with its usual gallantry at the battle of Cedar creek, and thereafter it was never again heavily engaged, though in the final assault upon the enemy's works at Petersburg, April 2, 1865, it carried itself with conspicuous courage, suffering, however, only a trifling loss. Upon Lee's surrender it was sent to Danville, whence it proceeded to Washington late in May, and subsequently to Trenton, where it was finally disbanded. The total strength of the regiment was 1,871, and it lost during its term of service, by resignation 26, by discharge 197, by promotion 76, by transfer 619, by death 361, by desertion 108, by dismissal 2, not accounted for 66, mustered out, 416. 

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $65.00 USD

15 New Jersey Infantry 1903 Badge

Offered is a great badge worn at the reunion of the 15th New Jersey Infantry in 1903 held in Dover, New Jersey.  This badge is a Guest badge worn by people other than the veterans.  The badge has a red, white, and blue ribbon as its base.  A wonderful U.S. flag is applied and stitched on the upper part of the badge.  Written on the badge in gold color ink is “Guest – 24th Annual Reunion 15th N.J.V.V.A. – Dover, N.J. – September 17, 1903”.  The badge is approximately 5 7/16 inches tall and approximately 2 inches wide.  The badge was made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted by the makers label attached to the back of the ribbon.  

15th New Jersey Infantry

Regimental History
Fifteenth Infantry. — Cols., Samuel Fowler, William H. Penrose; Lieut. -Col., Edward L. Campbell; Majs., James M. Brown, Daniel R. Burrell, Lambert Boeman, Ebenezer W. Davis. This regiment was organized at Flemington in July and Aug., 1862. Three companies were recruited in Sussex county, two in Warren, two in Hunterdon, two in Morris and one in Somerset, and all were composed of men of superior physical strength and capacities for endurance. The regiment was mustered into the U. S. service on Aug. 25, and on the 27th left for Washington, numbering 925 officers and men, Col. Samuel Fowler commanding. At Bakersville, Md., it was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 6th army corps, and henceforth participated in the hardships, battles and triumphs of the Army of the Potomac. At the battle of Fredericksburg the regiment was stationed along the line of the railroad, keeping up a musketry fire and now and then charging upon the enemy. The total loss in the regiment here was about 30. Its next engagement was at Chancellorsville, where it charged gallantly through a thick wood, found the enemy advantageously posted behind a wall and ditch, but with a royal courage the 15th bravely faced all obstacles and maintained the fight until 8 p. m. when, owing to a want of concert of action, it was compelled to fall back, having lost 150 in killed, wounded and missing. The regiment was present at the battle of Gettysburg, though not actively engaged. Then following the enemy it came upon his rear-guard near Fairfield on July 5, and a sharp skirmish followed. The pursuit was continued for several days and near Hagerstown there was a skirmish in which 2 men of the regiment were wounded, 1 by a bullet through the foot, and Jacob O. Burdett through both thighs. The regiment marched with the army to Centerville and back again to the Rappahannock ; was present, though not engaged, at the capture of Rappahannock Station ; and after the Mine Run movement went into winter-quarters 2 miles from Brandy Station. May 5, 1864, found it in the Wilderness and the sounds of battle where Warren had come into collision with Ewell's corps, soon brought the order hastening the 6th corps to his support. Several men of the regiment were wounded and Leonard Decker of Co. D was killed. On the following day the line was broken on the right and the enemy penetrated to the rear, but the men of the 15th held an advanced and isolated position till midnight, when, without loss they followed the rest of the army to a new line in the rear. By 10 a. m. on the 7th, the works on the new line had been made very strong, and though the enemy felt the line in front and drove in a part of the skirmish line, by which 3 men were wounded, and John Brogan of Co. A was killed, no real advantage was gained. About noon on May 8, the regiment reached the field of action at Spottsylvania Court House, meeting many of the 5th corps going in squads to the rear. On the following day it moved gallantly forward, charging at a double-quick, and had it been properly supported the victory must have been complete, but overwhelmed, it slowly fell back, having lost in all 101 men. However, it had performed one of the most gallant achievements of the campaign and in that thought the survivors found some compensation for their sufferings, as, exhausted and worn, they withdrew from the scene of combat. At noon of the 9th, the regiment again moved, marching to the right, but did not become actively engaged, though three companies were stationed on the skirmish line and the whole command was much exposed. On the 10th the regimental position was no less exposed, but the command bravely held its own against the onsets of the enemy, losing in all 20 men. On the 12th the regiment dashed through the abatis before the Confederate works, swept over a portion of the breastworks, which for a time it stoutly held, driving out the Confederates, or bayoneting those who tenaciously clung to the position. But the regiment was forced to fall back and when Col. Campbell gathered his shattered battalion only 75 were found. Forty bodies, or nearly one-fifth of the whole regiment, lay on the breastwork, in the ditch or on the narrow open space in front. From this time until May 24, the regiment was moved backward and forward, from the center to the left of the army, occasionally skirmishing with the enemy and losing a few men. It had broken camp on the 4th with 15 officers and 429 muskets, and was now reduced to 6 officers and 136 muskets. From May 21 to June 1 it was kept in motion most of the time with an occasional loss on the skirmish line, being present at the battle of the North Anna and other places of conflict. When the 6th corps charged at Cold Harbor 25 of the regiment were killed or wounded — Sergt.-Maj. A. V. Wyckoff being among the former. On a little hillock captured in this charge the regiment remained for the greater part of the next ten days, though from it many never came alive. On June 19 it reached the outer defenses of Petersburg, where it remained, with the exception of a march to Reams' station, until the night of July 9, when it proceeded to the James river and took steamer for Washington, going thence to the Shenandoah Valley. Nothing of particular importance occurred until Aug. 15, when it was assaulted at Strasburg and lost 9 men. On the 17th it skirmished all day through Newtown and Winchester, the brigade forming the rear-guard of the army. In this action the regiment lost 61 men in killed and missing. On the 21st the enemy assaulted the lines at Charlestown, whither the army troops had retired, and a number of men were lost. At the battle of the Opequan the regiment suffered severely, losing nearly 50 in killed and wounded. On the 21st the regiment had a skirmish with the enemy, in which 2 men were killed and 15 wounded. At Fisher's hill, whither Early had retreated, the brigade moved to the right and at 4 o'clock p. m. assaulted and captured the Confederate works, the regiment displaying great gallantry. It also performed with its usual gallantry at the battle of Cedar creek, and thereafter it was never again heavily engaged, though in the final assault upon the enemy's works at Petersburg, April 2, 1865, it carried itself with conspicuous courage, suffering, however, only a trifling loss. Upon Lee's surrender it was sent to Danville, whence it proceeded to Washington late in May, and subsequently to Trenton, where it was finally disbanded. The total strength of the regiment was 1,871, and it lost during its term of service, by resignation 26, by discharge 197, by promotion 76, by transfer 619, by death 361, by desertion 108, by dismissal 2, not accounted for 66, mustered out, 416. 

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $65.00 USD

153 Pennsylvania Infantry 1889 Gettysburg Reunion/Monument Badge

Offered is a great badge worn by a member of the 153rd Pennsylvania Infantry at their 1889 reunion held in Gettysburg.  During the 1889 reunion they also dedicated the main monument to the 153rd Pennsylvania Infantry on the Gettysburg battle field so this badge was worn during the monument dedication!  The badge has a gold colored cloth hanger attached to a red ribbon with gold metalic fringe hanging on the bottom of the ribbon.  An 11th corps badge is in gold colored ink at the top of the ribbon.  Written below the corps badge is "153d Regt. PA. Vols - 1st Brigade - 1st Division - 11th Corps - Army of the Potomac - Gettysburg - July 1,2,3, 1863 - Sept. 11 & 12, 1889".  The ribbon is approximately 7 3/8 inches tall and approximately 2 inches wide.  There are six nat bites out of the left side of the badge.

The 153rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment lost 1 officer and 48 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 28 enlisted men to disease during the Civil War. The regiment is honored by two monuments at Gettysburg.

1862
SeptemberOrganized for nine months service at Easton under Colonel Charles Glanz, Lieutenant Colonel Jacob Dachrodt and Major John F. Frueaff
October 6Moved to Camp Curtin, Harrisburg
October 12To Washington, D.C.and duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C. Attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac.
November 28-30Reconnaissance from Chantilly to Snicker’s Ferry and Berryville, Va.
December 9-16March to Fredericksburg, Va.
December 17Duty at Stafford Court House
1863
January 20-24Burnside’s 2nd Campaign, “Mud March”
Feberuary-AprilAt Stafford Court House
April 27-May 6Chancellorsville Campaign
May 1-5
Battle of Chancellorsville

The regiment’s first experience of battle was Stonewall Jackson’s flank attack, with the 153rd at the extreme flank f the army. The regiment fired a single volley before it was flanked on both flanks and was ordered by General Von Gilsa to retire. It did so until reaching the open ground to the west of Chancellorsville, where it rallied.

Colonel Glanz and 33 enlisted men were captured. Nineteen men were killed. Lieutenant Colonel Jacob Dachrodt, Major Frueaff, Captain Owen Rice of Company A, Second Lieutenant Conrad Reyer of Company H, and 53 enlisted men were wounded.

June 11-July 24
Gettysburg Campaign

Colonel Glanz returned from imprisonment but his health was too poor to resume command.

July 1-3
Battle of Gettysburg

The regiment was commanded at Gettysburg by Major John Freuauff. It suffered heavily in the fight north of town at the Almshouse on July 1, and again at the gates of the Cemetery on the evening of July 2.

From the monument on Barlow’s Knoll at Gettysburg:

July 1. The Regiment held this position in the afternoon until the Corps was outflanked and retired, when it took position along the lane at the foot of East Cemetery Hill, where it remained until the close of the battle, assisting to repulse the enemy’s assault on the night of the 2nd.

Carried into action 24 officers 545 men. Killed and died of wounds 10 officers 40 men. Wounded 7 officers 117 men. Captured and missing 46 men. Total loss 211.

Second Lieutenant William H. Beaver was killed and Captains Theodore H. Howell, John P. Ricker, Joseph S. Myers, Henry Oerter and George Young, and First Lieutenants Benjamin Schaum, George W. Walton and Horatio Yeager were wounded.

July 5-12Pursuit of Lee
July 24Mustered out under Colonel Glanz, Lieutenant Colonel Dachrodt and Major Frueaff

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $265.00 USD

9 Michigan Infantry Regimental Badge

Offered is a great badge worn by veterans of the 9th Michigan Infantry at many of their reunion.  The hanger has an eagle standing over two crossed rifles.  Attached to the hanger is a drop with the likeness of Major General George Thomas.  Written on the badge is "Maj. Gen. Thomas - 1861 - 1865".  Written on the back of the drop is "The Rock of Chickamauga - September 20, 1863 - With Peace Who Shall Set bounds To Our Nations Greatness".  The badge was made by a Kalamazoo, Michigan badge maker as noted on the back of the hanger.

9th Michigan Infantry
in the American Civil War

Regimental History
Ninth Michigan Infantry.— Cols., William W. Duffield, John G. Parkhurst; Lieut. -Cols., John G. Parkhurst, William Wilkinson; Majs., Dorus M. Fox, William Jenney, Jr. This regiment was organized at Fort Wayne, Detroit, in Sept., 1861, and was mustered in Oct. 15. It left the state Oct. 25, for Jeffersonville, Ind., moved to West Point, Ky., in November and engaged in building field works, roads and bridges. On Jan. 4, 1862, companies A, B, C, D, F and K were detailed to Elizabethtown, E and G following on the 17th, leaving I at West Point. Co. K was sent to Nolin. In the spring the regiment was attached to the 23d brigade, Army of the Cumberland, and moved to Nashville in March, where it joined in the pursuit of Morgan's forces in May, overtaking them at Lebanon and driving them from the town thoroughly demoralized. The regiment engaged in the movement into Tennessee, making a demonstration on Chattanooga, and was in the forced march over mountain roads near Winchester, capturing the enemy's pickets at Sweeden's cove, surprising and routing Adams' cavalry. It was in the engagement at Chattanooga in June and in July six companies were attacked at Murfreesboro by Forrest's cavalry. After a sharp struggle they were compelled to surrender, with a loss of 13 killed and 78 wounded. The wounded officers and men were at once paroled and were afterwards exchanged. The 9th's share in this was most gallant, and it was only when reduced to 137 men and officers, with no hope for reinforcements, and annihilation as the only alternative, that the command surrendered. The regiment was engaged at La Vergne in December and was detailed by Gen. Thomas for headquarters guard and provost duty for the 14th corps. At the battle of Stone's river it checked the rout of the right wing, which was being driven back by overwhelming numbers, and at a time when the panic was extending to the army. The flight of infantry, cavalry and artillery was stopped with bayonet and saber. Col. Parkhurst forcing 2,000 cavalry, 3,000 infantry and 11 pieces of artillery from the demoralized and fleeing troops and repulsing a charge by the enemy. The regiment was engaged on provost duty during the battles of Chickamauga and Missionary ridge, remaining on provost duty during November. In December 306 reenlisted as veterans and were furloughed home in Jan., 1864. They returned to Chattanooga in February with about 200 recruits and participated in the Georgia campaign, being in action at Rocky Face ridge, Resaca, Dallas, Kennesaw mountain, the Chattahoochee river, the siege of Atlanta and at Jonesboro. The regiment was on provost duty in Atlanta during its occupation and returned to Chattanooga Nov. 1 via Marietta. It remained on guard duty at the headquarters of the Army of the Cumberland and on picket duty until March 27, 1865, when headquarters were moved to Nashville, the regiment following for the same duty and for prison guard. It was mustered out at Nashville Sept. 15, 1865. Its original strength was 913: gain by recruits, 1,309; total, 2,222. Loss by death, 292. 

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $295.00 USD

7 Michigan Infantry 1927 Reunion Badge

Offered is a great badge worn by a veteran of the 7th Michigan Infantry at their 1927 reunion held in Monroe, Michigan.  The 7th Michigan Infantry was a hard fighting unit in the Army of the Potomac with all the major battles the Army of the Potomac fought on their resume.  This super badge has as a hanger a large celluloid pin back button (approximately 2 1/4 inches) with the likeness of Colonel G.W. La Pointe on it.  Three ribbons are attached to the hanger.  The first ribbon is red and has "7th Mich. Inf." written on it in gold colored ink.  The second ribbon is white and has "Monroe, Mich." written on it in gold colored ink, and the third ribbon is blue with "June 14, 1927" written on it with gold colored ink.  The badge was made by the St. Louis Button COmpany of St. Louis, Missouri as noted on the manufacturer's label located on the back of the pin back button.  

George W. LaPointe

Residence Monroe County MI; 19 years old.

Enlisted on 6/19/1861 at Monroe, MI as a Private.

On 8/22/1861 he mustered into "D" Co. MI 7th Infantry 
He was Mustered Out on 7/5/1865 at Jeffersonville, IN


He was listed as:
* Wounded 5/13/1864 Spotsylvania Court House, VA


Promotions:
* Sergt 11/2/1861 
* 2nd Lieut 9/18/1862 
* 1st Lieut 5/20/1863 
* Capt 9/21/1863 (As of Co. C)
* Lt Colonel 10/12/1864 
* Colonel 4/2/1865 by Brevet 

The 7th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment lost 11 officers and 197 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 officers and 186 enlisted men by disease. The regiment is honored by a monument at Gettysburg.

1861
August 22Organized at Monroe, Mich. and mustered in under Colonel Ira Rufus Grosvenor
September 5Left State for Washington, D.C. with 884 officers and enlisted men; Attached to Lander’s Brigade, Army of the Potomac
OctoberAttached to Lander’s Brigade, Stone’s Division, Army of the Potomac
September – DecemberGuard duty along the upper Potomac
October 22Near Edward’s Ferry
December 4Moved to Muddy Branch and duty there. Colonel Grosvenor took command of the brigade as senior colonel.
1862
MarchAttached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac
March 12-15Moved to Harper’s Ferry, thence to Charleston and Berryville
March 24To Harper’s Ferry, then to Washington, D.C
March 27To the Virginia Peninsula
April to AugustPeninsula Campaign
April 5-May 4Siege of Yorktown
May 7-8West Point
May 31-June 1Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines
June 25-July 1Seven days before Richmond
June 29Peach Orchard and Savage Station
June 30
White Oak Swamp and Glendale

Lieutenant Charles Hunt was wounded

July 1Malvern Hill
July 7Colonel Grosvenor resigned “due to the impoverished state of my health.”
July 14Lieutenant Norman J. Hall, USA (USMA 1859), former Acting AAG on the staff of Brigadier General John G. Barnard, was commissioned colonel of the 7th Michigan.
July 2 – August 16Duty at Harrison’s Landing
August 5Action at Malvern Hill
August 15-28Movement from Harrison’s Landing to Alexandria
August 28-31To Fairfax Court House; Cover Pope’s retreat from Bull Run to Washington.
September 4Captain Henry W. Nall was transferred to the 24th Michigan and appointed major.
September 6-22Maryland Campaign
September 16-17
Battle of Antietam

The 7th Michigan was commanded by Colonel Norman Hall. Colonel Hall took over the brigade as senior colonel when General Dana was wounded and was himself wounded. Lieutenant Colonel Baxter was wounded by this time, and Captain Charles J. Hunt took over the regiment.

From the brigade marker at Antietam:

Dana’s Brigade, following Gorman’s in column of attack, passed through the East Woods, crossed the Cornfield and the Hagerstown Pike, about 50 yards in rear of Gorman, and entered the West Woods, where its advance was checked about 40 yards east of this point.

Its left flank having been attacked and turned, by McLaws’ and Walker’s Divisions, it was compelled to retire.

A portion of the Brigade, with the 1st Minnesota Infantry, occupied a line near the Nicodemus house which it held for a time until, its flank having been again turned, it retired to the woods and fields east of the Hagerstown Pike.

September 22Moved to Harper’s Ferry, W. Va. and duty there
October 30-
November 17
Advance up the Loudon Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va.
December 11-15
Battle of Fredericksburg

The 7th Michigan was the first regiment to cross the Rappahannock River in pontoon boats under the fire of Confederate sharpshooters. It then drove the Confederate skirmishers from their cover, allowing a pontoon bridge to be constructed. Lieutenant Colonel Baxter was wounded in the attack.

December 11Forlorn hope to cross the Rappahannock at Fredericksburg
DecemberDuty at Falmouth, Va.
1863
April 27-May 6Chancellorsville Campaign
May 3Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg
May 3-4Salem Heights
June 11-July 24Gettysburg Campaign
July 1-3
Battle of Gettysburg

The 7th Michigan was commanded at Gettysburg by Lieutenant Colonel Amos Steele, Jr. while Colonel Hall commanded the brigade as senior colonel. Lieutenant Colonel Steele was killed on July 3rd, and Major Sylvanus W. Curtis took command. The 7th brought 165 men to the field, losing 21 killed and 44 wounded.

From the regimental monument near the Copse of Trees at Gettysburg: 

Regiment held this position during the engagement of July 2nd and 3rd, 1863. On the evening of the 2nd changed front to the left, meeting and aiding in driving back the enemy. On the 3rd assisted in repulsing Pickett’s Charge, changing front to the right and assaulting the advancing force in flank.

Present for duty 14 officers 151 men. Total 165. Casualties, 2 officers 19 men killed; 3 officers 41 men wounded. Total 65.

July 5-24Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va.
August 20-
September 12
On detached duty at New York City during draft disturbances
October 9-22Rejoined army at Culpeper, Va. Bristoe Campaign
October 14Bristoe Station
November 7-8Advance to line of the Rappahannock
November 26-December 2Mine Run Campaign
DecemberAttached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps
DecemberAt Stevensburg
1864
May 4-June 15Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River
May 5-7
Battle of the Wilderness
May 8Laurel Hill
May 8-21
Battle of Spotsylvania Court House

Captain George W. LaPointe was wounded in the right knee.

May 10Po River
May 12Assault on the Salient, “Bloody Angle,”
May 23-26North Anna River
May 26-28On line of the Pamunkey
May 28-31Totopotomoy
June 3
Battle of Cold Harbor
June 4Colonel Hall was discharged due to chronic dysentery, chills and fever. He would die in May of 1867.
June 16-18First Assault on Petersburg
June 16Siege of Petersburg begins
June 22-23Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad
July 27-29Demonstration on north side of the James River
July 27-28Deep Bottom
August 13-20Demonstration north of James at Deep Bottom
August 14-18Strawberry Plains
August 25Ream’s Station
October 13Captain George W. LaPointe of Company C was promoted to lieutenant colonel.
October 27-28
Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run
November 18Lieutenant Colonel George W. La Pointe was promoted to colonel but was not mustered due to the reduced sized of the regiment.
1865
February 5-7Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run
March 25Watkins’ House
March 28-April 9Appomattox Campaign
March 30-31Boydton Road
March 31Crow’s House
April 2Fall of Petersburg
April 3-9Pursuit of Lee
April 6Sailor’s Creek
April 7High Bridge and Farmville
April 9
Appomattox Court House

Surrender of Lee and his army.

April 10 – May 2At Burkesville
May 2-12Moved to Washington, D.C.
May 23Grand Review
June 16-22Moved to Louisville, Ky., then to Jeffersonville, Ind.
July 5Mustered out

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $185.00 USD

2 Michigan Cavalry 1909 Reunion Badge

Offered is a nice badge worn by veterans of the 2nd Michigan Cavalry at their 1909 reunion.  The badge has a brass colored metal circular disk that holds a celluloid photo likeness of a lieutenant.  A yellow and blue ribbon is attached to the pin on the back of the badge.  Written around the lieutenant is "1861 - 65 - 2nd Mich. Cav. - 1909".  The badge was made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted by the manufacturer's label attached to the pin.  

2nd Michigan Cavalry
in the American Civil War

Regimental History
Second Michigan Cavalry. — Cols., Gordon Granger, Archibald P. Campbell; Lieut. -Cols., William C. Davies, Frederick Fowler, Benjamin Smith, Thomas W. Johnston; Majs., Robert H. G. Minty, Charles P. Babcock, Frank W. Dickey, John C. Godley, Leonidas S. Scranton, Marshall J. Dickinson, Harrison F. Nicholson, Charles N. Baker. This regiment was organized at Grand Rapids and was mustered in Oct. 2, 1861. It left the state on Nov. 14, was stationed at Benton barracks, St. Louis, was engaged in skirmishes at Point Pleasant, Tipton and New Madrid, participated in the siege of Island No. 10, and then moved with Pope's army to Mississippi. It was in the engagements at Pine hill, Monterey and Farmington, and the siege of Corinth. Col. Granger was made brigadier-general and was succeeded by Philip H. Sheridan as colonel, but the latter was not mustered in as such. The regiment was in the engagements at Booneville, Blackland, and Baldwin, in June, 1862, and was in a spirited fight at Booneville July 1, where 7,000 of Chalmer's cavalry were repulsed by six companies, numbering less than 500 men. This was one of the greatest minor victories of the war. The 2nd Mich. and 2nd Ia. cavalry followed the enemy for 20 miles, capturing a large amount of arms and clothing. The regiment was engaged at Rienzi in August, when a largely superior force was defeated and dispersed and many prisoners were captured. Col. Sheridan was made a brigadier- general and Lieut. -Col. Campbell was appointed colonel. The regiment was engaged at the battle of Perryville, Ky., then at Harrodsburg, Lancaster and the Rockcastle river. In Dec, 1862, and Jan., 1863, it was in a raid in eastern Tennessee, being engaged at Blountville, Zollicoffer, Wartrace, Jonesville, Bacon creek and Glasgow. In March it was engaged at Milton, Cainsville, Spring Hill, Columbia, Hillsboro and Brentwood. The engagement at Columbia was against a much larger force, but two battalions of the 2nd Mich. cavalry by tremendous efforts, saved the wagon trains, which were in charge of the 18th Ohio cavalry. The regiment fought at McGarvick's ford in April, and during the summer was engaged at Triune, Rover, Middletown, Shelbyville, Elk river ford, and Decherd. It participated at Chickamauga, holding an important point against an enemy, and in October was engaged in the pursuit of Wheeler's cavalry, being in action at Anderson's cross-roads. It fought at Sparta, Dandridge and Mossy creek, in December, and at Dandridge and Pigeon river in Jan., 1864. While at Cleveland, Tenn., 326 reenlisted as veterans and took a furlough, rejoining the regiment in July. On the Atlanta campaign the regiment fought at Dug gap, Red Clay, the Etowah river and Acworth, and joined Gen. Thomas' army in Tennessee. It met and defeated the enemy at Campbellville and Franklin in September; was engaged at Cypress river in October, where a force four times that of the Union army was defeated; participated at Raccoon ford, and during November was engaged at Shoal creek, Lawrenceburg, Campbellville, Columbia, Spring Hill and the battle of Franklin. During December it was engaged at Nashville, Richland creek, Pulaski and Sugar creek, and in 1865 fought at Corinth, Tuscaloosa, Trion, Bridgeville and Talladega. It was in camp at Macon from May 1 until July 17, detachments being sent to garrison Perry, Thomaston, Barnesville, Forsyth and Milledgeville. The regiment was mustered out Aug. 17, 1865. Its original strength was 1,163; gain 1,262; total, 2,425. Loss by death, 338. 

Price: $85.00 USD (Sale Pending)

McMillen Post No. 122, South Charleston, Ohio Pin Back

A nice pin back worn by Union veterans who were members of the McMillen Post No. 122 of South Charleston, Ohio.  The pin back has a woman holding a U.S.flag putting a wreath on a G.A.R. monument.  Written around the graphics is "McMillen Post No. 122, Ohio".  The badge was made by the Sommer Badge Manufacturing Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted in the back of the pin back.  The pin is approximately 1 1/4 inches wide.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $35.00 USD

10 New York Heavy Artillery Pin Back

A nice pin back worn by G.A.R. members who supported DeWitt C. Hurd of New York for the Department of New York Commander.  DeWitt C. hurd was in the 10th New York Heavy Artillery from 1862 until 1865.  This neat pin has a photo likeness of Hurd in the middle of the pin.  Written around the photo likeness is "For Department Commandr G.A.R. - DeWitt C. Hurd".  The badge was made by the Sommer Badge Manufacturing Company, Newark, New Jersey.  The pin back is approximately 1 3/4 inches wide.

Dewitt C. Hurd

Residence was not listed; 21 years old.

Enlisted on 8/8/1862 at Ellisburgh, NY as a Private.

On 8/19/1862 he mustered into "E" Co. NY 10th Heavy Artillery 
He was Mustered Out on 6/23/1865 at Petersburg, VA


Promotions:
* Qtr Master Serg 9/11/1862 
* Sergt Major 2/14/1865 


Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 9/11/1862 from company E to Field & Staff 


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $35.00 USD

Lewis S. Pilcher, U.S. Army Steward New York Pin back

A neat pin back worn by G.A.R. members who supported Lewis S. Pilcher for the Department of New York Commander, G.A.R.  The pin has a likeness of Pilcher in the middle.  Pilcher is wearing four badges in the photo.  One is a Mollus medal and another is a one star G.A.R. officers badge.  I can't quite tell the other two badges.  The pin back is approximately 1 1/4 inches wide.  It was made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.  Written around the likeness is "For Department Commander - Lewis S. Pilcher - U.S. Grant Post 327".


Lewis S. Pilcher

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted on 3/1/1862 as a Hospl Steward.

On 3/1/1862 he mustered into US Army Hospl Stewards 
He was discharged (date not stated)
 (Estimated date of enlistment)

Other Information:
born in 1845
Member of GAR Post # 327 (U. S. Grant) in Brooklyn, NY
Held GAR Offices:
* National Rules & Regs Committee for 1931
died in 1934 
Buried: Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, NY

The following was submitted by:  Research by Jack R. Box, CemeteryWorks.com

Lewis S. Pilcher is a famous surgeon / author / journal editor.
he wrote several books on treating wounds [with graphic illustrations]
his bio indicates 
- he was a hospital orderly
- he was a Navy surgeon in the Civil War era; 
  albeit, it may have been post war

the SUVCW grave registration reports him 
  hospital orderly, regular army



Lewis S. Pilcher, surgeon general


      New York

      served 5 years as a Navy surgeon

      M.D. ( 1845–1934), who served for 50 years as the first editor of the Annals of 
      Surgery.

      Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York 

      GAR US Grant Post
Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $35.00 USD

Monongahela Veterans Memorial Pin Back

A neat pin back worn by veterans at the Monongahela, Pennsylvania veteran's memorial.  The pin back has the monument in the middle of the pin.  Written around the monument is "Veterans Memorial - Monongahela, PA".  A Union shield is underneath the words "Monongahela, PA".  The pin back was made by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted in the back of the pin back.  The pin back is approximately 7/8 inches wide.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $35.00 USD

Monongahela, Pennsylvania Soldier's Memorial Pin Back

A nice celluloid pin back worn by veterans at the Monongahela Soldier's Memorial in Monongahela, Pennsylvania.  The likeness of the memorial is in the middle of the pin back.  Written around the likeness is "Monongahela Soldier's Memorial - May 30th".  The badge is made by the American Art Works, Coshocton, Ohio as noted in the back of the pin back.  The pin back is approximately 7/8 inches wide.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $35.00 USD

Johnny Clem, the Drummer Boy of Chickamauga, 1933 Pin Back

A neat pin back from the 1933 Grand Army of the Republic Department of Ohio 67th Annual Encampment held in Newark, Ohio.  The pin back has Major General John L. Clem's likeness in the middle of the pin back.  Written around the likeness is "67th Annual Encampment - Dept. Ohio G.A.R. - Maj. Gen. John L. Clem - Newark, Ohio  June 18 - 22, 1933".  The pin back is approximately 1 1/2 inches wide.  The pin back was made by the Lilley Company, Columbus, Ohio as noted in the back of the pin back.

John Clem
Drummer Boy of Chickamauga
Civil War
/
Union
DATE OF BIRTH - DEATH
August 13, 1851 – May 13, 1937

When President Abraham Lincoln in May 1861 issued the call for volunteers to serve in the Union army for a three year term, one of those who tried to answer was Ohio resident John Clem. Not yet 10 years old, Clem’s service was refused by the newly formed 3rd Ohio. Undeterred, Clem later tried to join the 22nd Michigan, where his persistence won over the unit’s officers. They agreed to let him follow the regiment, adopting him as a mascot and unofficial drummer boy. The officers also chipped in to pay his monthly salary of $13 before he finally was allowed to officially enlist in 1863.

Clem became a national celebrity for his actions at Chickamauga. Armed with a musket sawed down for him to carry, Clem joined the 22nd Michigan in the defense of Horseshoe Ridge on the afternoon of September 20. As the Confederate forces surrounded the unit, a Confederate colonel spotted Clem and shouted either “I think the best thing a mite of a chap like you can do is drop that gun” or called him a “damned little Yankee devil,” according to various sources. Rather than surrender, Clem shot the colonel and successfully made his way back to Union lines. For his actions, Clem was promoted to sergeant, the youngest soldier ever to become a noncommissioned officer in the U.S. Army, and became known as the “Drummer Boy of Chickamauga.”

Clem’s legend grew following the battle, although some stories may be apocryphal. One holds that his drum was destroyed at the Battle of Shiloh, earning him the nickname “Johnny Shiloh” and serving as inspiration for the song, “The Drummer Boy of Shiloh.” However, the 22nd Michigan, Clem’s unit, was not mustered until the summer after the Battle of Shiloh, making it unlikely Clem saw action in the battle with that regiment.

Clem went on to fight at Perryville, Murfreesboro, Kennesaw and Atlanta, where he was wounded twice. Clem was discharged from the Army in 1864 at age 13, but sought to rejoin the military in 1870. Nominated to West Point by President Ulysses S. Grant, Clem failed the entrance exam several times before Grant appointed him a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. Clem enjoyed a successful second military career, rising to the rank of colonel and assistant quartermaster general by 1906. He retired on the eve of U.S. entry into World War I with the rank of major general, the last Civil War veteran to actively serve in the U.S. Army. Clem died in 1937 and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $45.00 USD

Captain Henry M. Neil, Ohio Light Artillery Pin Back

A pin back worn at the 1934 Grand Army of the republic, Department of Ohio Annual Encampment held in Columbus, Ohio.  The imagein the middle of the pin back is Captain henry M. Neil.  Captain Neil enlisted in January, 1862 in the 11th Ohio Light Artillery.  On April 28. 1863 he was transferred to the 22nd Ohio Light Artillery.  The pin back is approximately 1 1/2 inches wide.  Written around Captain Neil's image on the pin back is "68th Annual Encampment - Dept. of Ohio G.A.R. - Capt. Henry M. Neil - Columbus, Ohio June 17 - 21, 1934".

11th Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery

Online Books
11th Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery Soldier Roster - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 10, by Ohio Roster Commission (Joseph B. Foraker, Governor, James S. Robinson, Sec'y of State and H. A. Axline, Adjutant-General), 1886     View Entire Book

Regimental History
Eleventh Independent Battery Light Artillery. — Capts., Archibald G. A. Constable, Frank C. Sands, Fletcher E. Armstrong; First Lieuts., Henry M. Neil, Cyrus Sears, William M. Wynne; Second Lieuts., William D. Linn, David A. Southworth, William K. Perrine, Amos B. Alger, William Bush, Milon D. Whaley, John A. McArthy. This battery was mustered into service Oct. 27, 1861, at St. Louis arsenal, Mo., by Lieut. George B. Sanford, 1st U. S. cavalry, to serve for three years, aggregating 151 men, rank and file. Its first actual service was with the New Madrid expedition, from which it brought in 2 Confederate 6-pounder guns as trophies of its success, and then it remained in camp until April 12, improving the time by drilling in field maneuvers. During the siege, and in the battles and skirmishes resulting in the evacuation of Corinth, the battery bore its full share. In September it went into action at Iuka, 102 strong, and during the engagement was charged three different times, suffering a loss of 2 officers and 55 men killed or wounded, 18 being killed on the field and others dying afterward. Not a man flinched and numbers were killed or wounded after the Confederates had passed the muzzles of the guns, some of them nobly dying in the attempt to spike their pieces. But, severely as the battery suffered in this engagement in the loss of men and equipments, it was in a short time again ready for the field and took a prominent part in the battle of Corinth, nobly maintaining its reputation for efficiency and gallantry and suffering a loss of 5 men wounded during the action. During the siege of Vicksburg it was held in reserve and participated in several expeditions to the rear, fighting as occasion required. On the day of the capitulation it was camped at Snyder's bluff on the Yazoo river. The battery was mustered out on Nov. 5, 1864.

 22nd Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery

Online Books
22nd Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery Soldier Roster - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 10, by Ohio Roster Commission (Joseph B. Foraker, Governor, James S. Robinson, Sec'y of State and H. A. Axline, Adjutant-General), 1886     View Entire Book

Regimental History
Twenty-second Independent Battery Light Artillery. — Capts., Henry M. Neil, Amos B. Alger; First Lieuts., George W. Taylor, Peter Cornell, Harvey Burdell, Silas H. Towler; Second Lieuts., Jacob M. Sharp, William West. A section of this battery was organized April 1, 1863, and placed on duty at Wheeling, W. Va., and in Holmes county, Ohio. This section was brought back to Camp Chase on June 19, 1863, the organization completed, and mustered into service on July 14, 1863, by Capt. J. L. Proctor of the 18th U. S. infantry, to serve for three years. The battery was sent to Parkersburg, W. Va., and thence to Wheeling. From Wheeling it moved to Hancock, Md., in support of Gen. Kelley, and then returned to Parkersburg, sending out detachments in pursuit of Gen. Morgan, then on his raid through Indiana and Ohio. After the capture of Morgan the battery returned to Camp Chase. On Aug. 12, 1863, it marched to Camp Nelson, Ky., and on Sept. 1 marched toward Cumberland gap. It arrived in front of the gap on Sept. 7, and took part in the operations which compelled its surrender. On Jan. 3, 1864, a detachment under command of Lieut. A. B. Alger, in company with a force of 350 cavalry, while on a reconnoissance at Jonesville, Va., was compelled to surrender after 12 hours' fighting, for want of ammunition. On Feb. 14, 1864, Lieut. George W. Taylor was murdered by a Confederate citizen, near Barboursville, Ky., and on June 21, 1864, Peter Cornell was killed by Confederate guerrillas, near Cumberland gap. On June 27, 1864, the battery was ordered to Knoxville, Tenn., and on July 5, 1865, it was ordered to Camp Chase, Ohio, where it was mustered out on the 13th, in accordance with orders from the war department. 

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $40.00 USD

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