Civil War Photographs
Confederate
Confederate Soldier Monument at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia

A very nice image of the Confederate soldier monument at Hollywood cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.  You can see grave stones in front of the monument.  The photo was by Anderson, Richmond, VA.  This image is a CDV approximately 4 18 inches by 2 7/16.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $165.00 USD

Confederate 1st Lieutenant Unided CDV

A very nice, clean image of a Confederate officer with two stripes (1st Lieutenant) on his collar.  The image has been nicely colorized with the buttons tinted gold and colorization on his cheeks.  There is no backmark.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price Was: 285.00 Price: $235.00 USD

Major Flavel Barber - 3 Tennessee Infantry - CDV - KIA Resaca, GA.

A hard to find image of Major Flavel C. Barber of Company A, 3rd Tennessee Infantry, CSA.  This photograph was taken while he was Captain of Company A.  You can clearly see the three rank stripes on his uniform.  Barber was promoted to Major and was killed at the Battle of Resaca, Georgia.  The backmark is "J.H. Van Stavoren's Photographic Gallery of Fine Arts - Cor. Cherry & Union Sts., Nashville, Tenn.". 

We have had this image on our web site and it was misidentified as Captain James S. Walker.  A sharp eyed historian, Hank L. Hewgley of Hendersonville, Tennessee, contacted us and gave us undisputed proof of our mistake.  We are sorry for the misidentification but that is the identity on the image when we purchased it.  Read about Barber in his book "Holding the Line: The Third Tennessee Infantry, 1861 - 1864" edited by Robert H. Ferrell.
 
3rd Tennessee Infantry, C.S.A.
 

From Camp Trousdale, the 3rd Tennessee Infantry moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky, where they reported to General Simon B. Buckner on September 19, 1861. Colonel John C. Brown was senior Colonel and was given command of a brigade composed of the 3rd, 18th, 23rd and 24th Regiments of Tennessee Infantry, Jones' Battalion of Tennessee Cavalry, and Porter's Tennessee Battery. Here they suffered much sickness and endured hard drill under the direction of Colonel Brown. "The drill was very exacting and fatiguing, and in the process of hardening for service the numbers were reduced by sickness, permanent disability, and death."

"Colonel John C. Brown was a strict disciplinarian, full of the magnitude of the work ahead, and determined that his regiment, composed of picked material, should not be excelled." Brown's Brigade remained in and around Bowling Green until the following February.

On February 8, 1862, the 3rd Tennessee Infantry reached Fort Donelson, Tennessee, on the Cumberland River, with 750 men present. The 32nd Tennessee Infantry Regiment, which included four companies from Giles County, replaced the 23rd Tennessee Infantry as a part of Brown's Brigade. As Colonel Brown was in command of the brigade, Lt. Colonel Thomas M. Gordon commanded the 3rd Tennessee Infantry. Brown's Brigade was in the worst of the fighting of the Battle of Fort Donelson. The 3rd Tennessee Infantry lost 13 men killed and 56 wounded. Practically all of the rest of the regiment was surrendered on February 16, 1862. The officers were taken to Fort Warren, Massachusetts and Camp Chase, Ohio. The non-commissioned officers and privates were taken by steamboat to Camp Douglas, Illinois. Colonel John C. Brown was offered his freedom, but chose to suffer the same fate as his men, who spent the next seven months as prisoners of war in northern prisons.

The intense cold of Camp Douglas, Illinois, located on Lake Michigan near Chicago, took a heavy toll on the men of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry. A few managed to escape, but most suffered through the winter with insufficient clothing and food. At least a dozen men of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry died within the confines of Camp Douglas. Others of the regiment had died on the trip northward and officers suffered and died in other prison camps. Finally, after seven long months, the men and officers of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry were loaded on boats and taken down the Mississippi River to be paroled and exchanged.


The 3rd Tennessee Infantry was paroled at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on September 23, 1862. At this point they were no longer prisoners, but could not rejoin the Confederate Army until they were formally exchanged on November, 10, 1862. The 3rd Tennessee Infantry was reorganized for the third and final time at Jackson, Mississippi, on September 26, 1862, with 607 men present. Colonel John C. Brown had been promoted to Brigadier General and had been called to Chattanooga to join General Bragg's army. Calvin Harvey Walker was elected Colonel. Calvin J. Clack was elected Lieutenant Colonel. Thomas M. Tucker and Flavel C. Barber were elected Majors.

Other Regimental officers were:

  • Adjutant - David S. Martin
  • Quartermasters - J. L. Herron and John D. Flautt
  • Commissary - John S. Wilkes
  • Surgeons - James A. Bowers, Daniel F. Wright and C. C. Abernathy
  • Assistant Surgeons - J. T. S. Thompson, J. L. Lipford, J. Henderson, and Thomas H. Moss
  • Chaplain - Thomas Deavenport
  • Sergeant-Major - John Phillips
  • Quartermaster Sergeant - Lewis Amis
  • Commissary Sergeants - R. S. Wilkes and S. S. Craig
  • Ordnance Sergeant - B. S. Thomas
  • Hospital Stewart - Robert P. Jenkins

The companies were reorganized:

*Company A, formerly Company K - Captain Flavel C. Barber, 1st Lt. Thomas E. McCoy, 2nd Lt. Willis H. Jones, Junior 2nd Lt. James P. Bass, rank and file, 100 men, with recruits.

*Company B, formerly Company B - Captain Robert A. Mitchell, 1st Lt. J. M. Thompson, 2nd Lt. M. T. West, Junior 2nd Lt. W. T. Mitchell, rank and file 105 men, with recruits.

Company C, formerly Company H - Captain Robert T. Cooper, 1st Lt. W. J. Hardin, 2nd Lt. R. M. Plummer, Junior 2nd Lt. James A. Doyle, rank and file 75 men, with recruits.

Company D, formerly Company C. - Captain Walter S. Jennings, 1st Lt. W. C. Dunham, 2nd Lt. R. R. Williams, Junior 2nd Lt. Y. R. Watkins, rank and file 80 men, with recruits,

Company E, formerly Company F - Captain George W. Jones, 1st Lt. J. B. Murphy, 2nd Lt. B. G. Darden, Junior 2nd Lt. J. F. Matthews, rank and file 87 men, with recruits.

Company F, formerly Company E - Captain R. B. McCormick, 1st Lt. D. G. Stevenson, 2nd Lt. Thomas Thompson, Junior 2nd Lt. G. P. Straley, rank and file 77 men, with recruits.

*Company G, formerly Company A - Captain David Rhea, 1st Lt. David S. Martin, 2nd Lt. John C. Lester, Junior 2nd Lt. Wallace W. Rutledge, rank and file 97 men, with recruits.

*Company H, formerly Company G - Captain James S. Walker, 1st Lt. J. B. McCanless, 2nd Lt. J. A. Rastin, Junior 2nd Lt. Calvin J. Orr, rank and file 101 men, with recruits.

*Company I, formerly Company D - Captain D. G. Alexander, 1st Lt. J. P. Lock, 2nd Lt. J. B. Farley, Junior 2nd Lt. N. B. Rittenberry, rank and file 90 men, with recruits.

Company K, formerly Company I - Captain B. F. Mathews, 1st Lt. John Hildreth, 2nd Lt. Alonzo Lindsay, Junior 2nd Lt. J. H. Hagan, rank and file 87 men, with recruits.

The 3rd Tennessee Infantry was placed in Brigadier General John Gregg's Brigade and was involved in a sharp skirmish at Springdale, Mississippi, and took part in the Battle of Chickasaw Bayou on December 27-29, 1862. The brigade then moved to Port Hudson, Louisiana, and endured the Federal bombardment of Port Hudson.

On May 11, 1863, the 3rd Tennessee Infantry arrived at Jackson, Mississippi, and the following day moved to Raymond, Mississippi, and met the advance of Union General U. S. Grant's army in one of the fiercest and bloodiest engagements of the war. 548 men of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry fought at Raymond, suffering casualties of 32 killed, 76 wounded and 68 captured. Before the battle, Colonel Walker had stepped out in front of the regiment and said, "We will soon be engaged in a battle and before we begin I wish to say that I do not command you to go, but to follow this old bald head of mine..."

"After marching and countermarching, under command of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, in the rear of Vicksburg, until its surrender on the 4th of July, 1863, the regiment found itself in the rifle-pits at Jackson, Miss., holding that point against the enemy from the 9th to the 16th of July, when it was transferred to the army in Georgia." "In the operations around Jackson, the regiment numbered 366 men, and suffered a total loss of 22 men, of whom 3 were killed, 6 wounded, and 13 captured."

On September 19th and 20, 1863, the 3rd Tennessee Infantry fought in the Battle of Chickamauga in north Georgia. 264 men of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry were engaged in that great Confederate victory. The regiment suffered 93 casualties, including 24 killed, 62 wounded and 7 captured.

On November 25, 1863, 195 men of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry were engaged in the Battle of Missionary Ridge, near Chattanooga. Casualties were light with 3 wounded and 1 captured.

The 3rd Tennessee Infantry went into winter camp in north Georgia and, on December 10, 1863, at Dalton, Georgia, rejoined General John C. Brown's Brigade. The following spring they participated in General Joseph E. Johnston's retreat to Atlanta and fought at Rocky Face Ridge, Sugar Creek Valley, Resaca, New Hope Church, Powder Springs Road, and finally at Jonesboro. Major Flavel C. Barber was killed at Resaca. Colonel Calvin Harvey Walker was killed at Powder Springs Road. Lt. Colonel Calvin J. Clack was killed at Jonesboro.


Following the fall of Atlanta, the 3rd Tennessee Infantry followed General John Bell Hood across northern Alabama and home to Tennessee. On November 18, 1864, they were at Columbia, Tennessee. The 3rd Tennessee Infantry reached Franklin late in the evening of November 30, too late to participate in the disasterous battle. From Franklin, The 3rd Tennessee Infantry was detached to General Nathan Bedford Forrest's command at Murfreesboro and did not participate in the Battle of Nashville. Forrest's command served as rear guard as the defeated Confederate Army of Tennessee retreated southward through Franklin, Columbia, and Pulaski toward the safety of the Tennessee River. A report dated December 21, 1864, indicated that the 3rd and 18th Regiments of Tennessee Infantry had been consolidated and had a total of 17 men present.

The remnant of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry moved with the Army of Tennessee into North Carolina where they were merged into the 4th Consolidated Tennessee Infantry on April 9, 1865. On April 26, 1865, General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee was surrendered. They were paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina, on May 1, 1865.


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $850.00 USD

General J.E.B. Stuart CDV

A nice but somewhat faded image of General James Ewell Brown "Jeb" Stuart.  The image is of Stuart seated and holding his cavalry saber.  Stuart graduated the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1854 and served with the 1st U.S. Cavalry on the Kansas frontier.  He was aide to Colonel Robert E. Lee during the capture of John Brown at Harpers Ferry.  He entered his Confederate service as Colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry and became famous for his exploits in the Shenandoah valley.  He was promoted to brigadier general after 1st Manassas and promoted to major general in July 1862.  Stuart was mortally wounded on May 11, 1864 at Yellow Tavern. 
 
The image has a 3 cent tax revenue stamp on the back and the backmark is E.&H.T. Anthony, New York.  "Jeb Stewart" is written in pencil on the bottom of the photograph.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $250.00 USD

General John Hunt Morgan CDV

A veteran of the Mexican War, General John Hunt Morgan led the Lexington Rifles and joined General Simon Buckner's command when the Civil War started.  From this point until his death three years later his exploits made him one of the legendary figures of the Confederacy.  He was promoted colonel of th 2nd Kentucky Cavalry in April 1862 and brigadier general in December, 1862.  His series of raids into Tennessee, Kentucky, Indian, and Ohio brought him the thanks of the Confederate congress.  On his most famous raid through Ohio in 1863, he was captured.  He escaped and was placed in command of the Department of the Southwestern Virginia.  He bivouacked in Greeneville, Tennessee on the night of September 3, 1864, while in route to attack Federal forces in Knoxville.  He was surprised by Union Cavalry and killed.
 
The image is a bust up image and has some fadding.  The backmark is E.& H.T. Anthony, New York.

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Price: $265.00 USD

General Simon Buckner CDV

General Simon Bolivar Buckner was a Kentucky native who graduated West point in 1844.  He earned two brevet promitins during the war with Mexico and resigned from the U.S. Regular Army in 1855 to pursue his private interests.  At the outbreak of the war he was the adjutant general of the state of Kentucky. He accepted a commision in the Confederate Army in September 1861.  He was left by Generals Floyd and Pillow to consumate the surrender of Fort Donelson.  He was exchanged and led a division in Bragg's invasion of Kentucky and fought at Perryville.  He moved to Mobile, Alabama to fortify it against the Union navy.  He directed a corps at the battle of Chickamauga.  After that he was promoted to Lieutenant General and he moved to the Trans-Mississippi.  He was Kirby Smith's chief of staff.
 
  The image is slightly faded and is attached to the back of the carte.  The back of the image has a line around the edges and has "Buckner" written in pencil.   General Buckner is seated and he is holding his sword.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $165.00 USD

General A.P. Hill - KIA - CDV

After graduating in 1847 from West Point, Hill fought in Mexico and against the Seminoles.  He resigned U.S. service in May 1861 and Entered Confederate service as Colonel of the 13th Virginia Infantry.  He was appointed brigadier general in February 1862 and major general in May 1862.  Hill was promoted lieuteneat general in May 1863.  He was killed April 2, 1865 at Petersburg.  The image has been rounded at the top and has an Anthony backmark.
 

Ambrose Powell Hill
(1825-1865)

Known for his red battle shirt and his hard-hitting attacks at the head of the famed Light Division, Ambrose P. Hill proved to be an example of the Peter principle.
A West Pointer (1847) and veteran artilleryman, he resigned as a first lieutenant on March 1, 1861, and joined the South, where his services included: colonel, 13th Virginia (spring 1861); brigadier general, CSA (February 26, 1862); commanding brigade, Longstreet's Division, Department of Northern Virginia (ca. February 26 - May 27, 1862); major general, CSA (May 26, 1862); commanding Light Division (in lst Corps from June 29 and 2nd Corps from July 27, 1862), Army of Northern Virginia (May 27, 1862 - May 2, 1863); commanding 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (May 2 and 6-30, 1863); lieutenant general, CSA (May 24, 1863); and commanding 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (May 30, 1863-May 7, 1864 and May 21, 1864-April 2, 1865).
In reserve at lst Bull Run, he fought at Yorktown and Williamsburg before being given command of a division. On the day he assumed command he directed the fight at Hanover Court House. He then took part in the Seven Days, distinguishing himself. After fighting at Cedar Mountain, 2nd Bull Run, and the capture of Harpers Ferry, he launched powerful counterattacks at the right moment at both Antietam and Fredericksburg. At Chancellorsville he was on Jackson's famed march around the Union right flank. When Jackson was wounded, Hill took command of the corps but was wounded carrying out his chief's orders to "press right in." At the end of the month he was given command of the new 3rd Corps, which he led to Gettysburg where, suffering from a now unidentifiable illness, he put in a lackluster performance.
He was responsible for the disaster at Bristoe Station that fall and, again ill, was virtually circumvented at the Wilderness when Lee in effect took over command of the corps. He relinquished command temporarily after the battle and missed Spotsylvania but returned for the North Anna and Cold Harbor. Taking part in the siege of Petersburg, he was again ill during part of the winter of 186465. With the lines around the city collapsing on April 2, 1865, he was shot and killed in an encounter with a stray group of federal soldiers.
Interestingly enough, both Stonewall Jackson and Lee called for Hill and his division in their dying delirium. It must have been the old Hill they were recalling. (Hassler, William W., A.P. Hill: Lee's Forgotten General and Schenck, Martin, Up Came Hill.- The Story of the Light Division and of its Leaders)
Source: "Who Was Who In The Civil War" by Stewart Sifakis


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $235.00 USD

General Jubal Early CDV

A nice bust image of General Jubal A. Early.  A 1837 graduate of West Point, he fought in the Mexican War as a major of the Virginia volunteers.  He entered Confederate service as a Colonel of the 24th Virginia Infantry.  He was promoted to brigadier general after 1st Manassas, and major general in 1863.  He became a lieutenant general in 1864.   He fought most of his Confederate career in the Army of Northern Virginia.  In 1864 he fought in the valley and put pressure on Washington, DC.  The image has an "E. &H.T. Anthony" backmark.  The image has been trimmed on the lower part of the CDV.
 
Jubal Early was born in Franklin County, Virginia on November 3, 1816,the third child of ten. When he was sixteen his mother died and the following year he received an appointment as a cadet to West Point. In 1837, he graduated 18th out of a class of 50. After serving in the army in the Seminole Wars in Florida, Early returned to Virginia where he studied law. After becoming a lawyer in 1840, he served in the Virginia Legislature during the 1841 and 1842 sessions. Though he lost reelection the following year, he received an appointment as prosecuting attorney, which he held until 1851. In 1844, Early mustered back into the army as a major. During the United States' war with Mexico, Early performed garrison duties, including a two month stint as military governor in Monterrey, Mexico. In April 1848, he once again was mustered out of service and returned home to continue his law practice.

Always an irascible officer, Jubal A. Early suffered overwhelming defeats in the Shenandoah Valley and went on after the conflict to wage a literary war with a fellow Confederate corps commander. A West Pointer (1837) from Virginia, Early had served one year in the artillery, and later in the Mexican War as a major of volunteers,before taking up law. Also involved in politics, he served in the legislature.

Although he voted against secession at the convention, he entered the military where his assignments included: colonel, 24th Virginia (early 1861); commanding 6th Brigade (in 1st Corps from July 20), Army of the Potomac June 20-October 22, 1861); brigadier general, CSA July 21, 1861);commanding brigade, Van Dorn's-D.H. Hill's Division (in Potomac District until March), Department of Northern Virginia (October 22, 1861-May 5, 1862); commanding Eizey's Brigade, Ewell's Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia Uuly 1-September 17, 1862); commanding the division (September 17, 1862-November 1863; ca. December 4-15, 1863; February-May 7; and May 21-27, 1864); major general, CSA (April 2 3 to rank from January 17, 1863); commanding the corps (November-ca. December 4, 1863 and May 27-June 13, 1864); commanding Valley District, Department of Northern Virginia (December 15, 1863 February 1864 and June 13, 1864-March 29, 1865); commanding 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (May 7-21, 1864); and lieutenant general, CSA (May 31, 1864).

Leading a brigade at 1st Bull Run and Williamsburg, he was wounded at the latter. Returning to duty, he was given another command on the day of Malvern Hill. At Cedar Mountain and 2nd Bull Run he directed this unit and continued until he succeeded to division level at Antietam. He went on to Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg and commanded the corps in the Mine Run operations. Detached, he commanded in the Shenandoah during the winter of 1863-64. After the Battle of the Wilderness he took over temporary control of Hill's Corps during the operations at Spotsylvania. He directed his division at the North Anna and took over Ewell's Corps before Cold Harbor.

A couple of weeks later this command was sent back to the Valley and Early invaded Maryland, fighting Jubal Earlyat Monocacy and on the outskirts of Washington. Falling back to Virginia, he dispatched part off his cavalry to burn Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, in retaliation for Union devastation. In September and October he was defeated in a series of disasters at the hands of Sheridan. The reverses at 3rd Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek ended his power in the Valley and the old 2nd Corps and was recalled to Lee in December.

However, Early remained with a small force that was destroyed at Waynesborough the following March. Lee then removed him, explaining that he was forced to by public reaction and the fact that he could not defend his subordinate without revealing how weak the Confederacy was. Early fled to Mexico but soon returned to practice law. He was connected with the Louisiana Lottery and was president of the Southern Historical Society. Becoming a defender of Lee, he feuded with Republican convert James Longstreet until his death.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $275.00 USD

Jonanthan R. Cleveland, Palmetto Sharpshooters & 4th SC Infantry Tintype

Atintype of a hard to find member of the Palmetto Sharpshooters and the 4th South Carolina Infnatry.  The image is of Jonathan R. Cleveland.  Cleveland served in COmpany L of the Palmetto Sharpshooters.  Cleveland served in the 4th South Carolina Infantry until selected to serve in the Palmetto Sharpshooters.  Cleveland is on the list of members of the Palmetto Shrpshooters present at the Appomattox surrender.  The image has flaked on the upper right side but does not affect the soldier's image.  The tintype is surrounded by a CDV size holded.  Written on the back of the image in period pencil is "Jonathan R. Cleveland".  Also written in pencil on the back of the image is information I have found about Cleveland.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $385.00 USD

General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson CDV

A nice image from life of General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.  Jackson was Genneral Lee's commander to go to when he needed action or something to happen.  Jackson was wounded at Chancellorville and died ten days later.  There is no backmark on the back of this image.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $225.00 USD

General Bushrod Johnson - CSA - CDV

A member of the Class of 1840, United States Military Acadamy at West Point, Bushrod Rust johnson saw service in the Seminole Warin Florida and the war with Mexico.  He resigned the army in 1847 to become a teacher at Western Military Institute at Georgetown, Kentucky and then the Military College of the University of Nashville.  Johnson was active in the militia of both states and entered service to the Confederacy as a colonel of engineers.  He was promoted to brigadier general in January 1862.  He was captured at Fort Donelson but escaped.  Later he was severly wounded at Shiloh.  After his recovery he led his brigade in the Kentucky campaign of 1862, at Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, and in the Knoxville campaign under Longstreet.   He was then transferred East, where he took part in the defense of Petersburg.  He was commisioned major general on May 21, 1864.  He served the rest of the war with the Army of Northern Virginia.  His division was shattered at Sayler's Creek.  He escaped but was on the parole records at Appomattox.  This image is missing the lower left corner.  The backmark is "E. & H.T. Anthony. 501 Broadway, New York, Manufacturers of the best Photographic Albumns.".

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $250.00 USD

Unidentified Confederate 1st Lieutenant CDV

A nice image of a seated Confederate officer.  The officer is wearing a shell jacket with two stripes on the collar.  The backmark is "Lee Gallery 1869, 920 Main Street, Richmond, Va.".  The image is clearly a post war image made from a ambrotype a few years after the war.  A nice Confederate image!

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $265.00 USD

General William Henry Fitzhugh (Rooney) Lee CDV

A nice image of Robert E. Lee's second son William Henry Fitzhugh (Rooney) Lee.  He was called Rooney to distinquish him from his first cousin, General Fitzhugh Lee.  Upon the secession of Virginia, Rooney Lee immediately entered Confederate service as Colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry.  With this regiment he followed Geneal J.E.B. Stuart through virtually all the campaigns of the Cavalry Corps of the Army of Northern virginia.  He was promoted brigadier general in September 1862.  Lee was severly wounded at Brandy Station and while recuperating , was captured by the Federals and imprisioned.  Not exchanged until March 1864, he was promoted major general in April 1864.  He was the youngest major general in Confederate service.  He played a very important part in the closing operations of the cavalry, and was second in command at Appomattox.  There is no backmark on this image.
 
William Henry Fitzhugh Lee

Major-General William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, the second son of Gen. Robert E. Lee, was born at
Arlington, Va., May 31, 1837. He was educated at Harvard college, where he was graduated in 1857.
In the same year he was appointed second lieutenant of the Sixth infantry, United States army, and in
this rank he served in the Utah campaign under Albert Sidney Johnston, and subsequently in
California. Early in 1859 he resigned his commission and took charge of his farm, the historic White
House, on the Pamunkey river. He was heartily in sympathy with the Confederate cause, and
organized a cavalry company early in 1861, becoming one of the leading spirits in the formation of
the gallant body of troopers which were subsequently distinguished in the history of the army of
Northern Virginia, and contributed so effectively to its successes. In May he received the rank of
captain, corps of cavalry, C. S. A., and in the same month was promoted major in the regular army.
During the West Virginia campaign he acted as chief of cavalry for General Loring. In the winter of
1861-62 he was ordered to Fredericksburg, Va., and was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the
Ninth Virginia cavalry regiment, promotion to the colonelship following in March. With his regiment he
was attached to the cavalry brigade of J. E. B. Stuart, and shared its operations during the retreat
from Yorktown toward Richmond. In the famous raid around McClellan's army Stuart's men were led
by the three colonels, Fitz Lee, W. H. F. Lee and W. T. Martin; the artillery under Breathed. His
troopers defeated the enemy's cavalry at Hawes' Shop, June 13th, during this expedition. Upon the
organization of the cavalry division in the following month, his regiment was assigned to the brigade
of Fitzhugh Lee, and he participated in the operations of this command in the campaign of Second
Manassas. After serving on the advanced line before Washington, during the advance into Maryland
he was particularly distinguished in the rear-guard fighting after the action at Turner's pass. Squadron
after squadron of his regiment bore the brunt of the attacks of the Federal advance until they were the
last to enter Boonsboro. At this point Colonel Lee was unhorsed and run over in crossing a bridge;
and severely bruised and at first unconscious, lay by the roadside for some time in full view of the
passing enemy. He managed to escape and finally reached the army on the Antietam, where he was
welcomed as one from the dead. Subsequently he commanded a detachment of Lee's brigade
during the Chambersburg raid, and held the advance during the return movement in the rear of
McClellan's army. His intrepid conduct and coolness in demanding the surrender of a largely superior
force of the enemy which held White's ford on the Potomac, caused the withdrawal of this obstacle
which might have been fatal to the safe return of Stuart's command to Virginia. At the reorganization
in November he, having been promoted brigadier-general, was given command of the brigade of
cavalry consisting of the Fifth, Ninth, Tenth, Fifteenth Virginia and Second North Carolina. During the
operations preceding and following the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville he was
frequently engaged, and during the combats with Pleasanton's cavalry before the Gettysburg
campaign he fought at Fleetwood Hill and Brandy Station, where he engaged the enemy in a series
of brilliant charges with his regiments, in one of the last of which he received a severe wound through
the leg. General Stuart reported "the handsome and highly satisfactory manner" in which he handled
his brigade, and the deplorable loss "for a short time only, it is hoped, of his valuable services. " But,
in his helpless condition, he was taken prisoner by Federal raiders and carried to Fortress Monroe,
where, and at Fort Lafayette, he was held until March, 1864. On his return to the army he was
promoted major-general and assigned to the command of a division of the cavalry. He participated in
the operations of the cavalry from the Rapidan to the James in 1864; was at Malvern hill when Grant
crossed the river; opposed Wilson's raid against the Weldon railroad in June; commanded the
cavalry at Globe Tavern, August; at Five Forks held the right of the Confederate line; and during the
retreat to Appomattox, aided Gordon in repulsing repeated assaults. After the surrender he retired to
his plantation, and resided there until his removal to Burke's Station in 1874. He was president for a
time of the State agricultural society, served one term in the State senate, and sat in the Fiftieth, Fifty-
first and Fifty-second Congresses as representative of the Eighth Virginia district. He died at
Alexandria, October 15, 1891.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $285.00 USD

General James R. Chalmers - Forrest's Cavalry - CDV

Here is a nice image of General James R. Chalmers of Forrest's Cavalry.  Chalmers started the Civil War as Colonel of the 9th Mississippi Infantry.  he was promoted to brigadier generral in February 1862 and fought at Shiloh under General Withers.  He led his brigade in the invasion of kentucky under General Bragg and at the battle of Murfreesboro, after which he transferred to cavalry.  He was given a division under General Forrest and fought with him in Northern Mississippi, Kentucky, and Tennessee.  Distinctly an individualist, his relations with Forrest were not always completely harmonious, although his ability and gallantry were unquestioned.  The image has a E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York" backmark.
 

Early life

Born to Mississippi congressman Joseph Williams Chalmers near Lynchburg, Virginia, Chalmers later moved with his family to Jackson, Tennessee, in 1835 and, three years later, to Holly Springs, Mississippi. He later attended St. Thomas Hall.

Studying law at South Carolina College (now present day University of South Carolina) in Columbia, South Carolina, Chalmers graduated in 1851 and, at the age of 21, attended as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention of 1852, before being admitted to the bar the following year.

Chalmers began practicing law upon his return to Holly Springs and, in 1858, later served as district attorney for the seventh judicial district of Mississippi before participating in the secession convention of Mississippi in January 1861.

Military service

Confederate Cavalry General James Ronald Chalmers

In March 1861, Chalmers enlisted in the Confederate Army as a captain and, despite no prior military experience, was elected Colonel of the 9th Mississippi Infantry Regiment the next month.

Stationed at Pensacola, Florida, during the first few months of the war, Chalmers was promoted to brigadier general on February 13, 1862, and later fought under General Withers at the Battle of Shiloh on April 6.

On July 1, 1862, Chalmers' force of nearly 5,000 infantry engaged in battle with Union Col. Philip Sheridan at a forward outpost near Booneville, Mississippi, and, during the subsequent Battle of Booneville, was defeated by the 31-year-old Union officer both by superior weaponry and by repeatedly moving Union troops off military transport trains, deceiving enemy forces into believing the Sheridan's command (only numbering 827 men) to be much larger than their own.

Despite this embarrassing defeat, Chalmers went on to have a successful military career, taking part in the Kentucky Campaign under General Braxton Bragg and as a brigade commander at the Battle of Stones River, where he was wounded at "Hell's Half-Acre".

In 1863, Chalmers was appointed commander of the District of Mississippi and East Louisiana before his transfer to the first division of Maj. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry corps the following year. Earning the nickname "Little 'Un" while under Forrest, Chalmers saw action in Confederate military operations in North Mississippi, Kentucky, and West Tennessee, as well service with the Confederate Army of Tennessee during Lt. Gen. John B. Hood's 1864 campaign. He was paroled in Gainesville, Alabama, on May 10, 1865.[1]

Later years

In the years following the war, Chalmers returned to Mississippi where he resumed his law career and, as a prominent Mississippi political figure during Reconstruction, served as a member of the state senate from 1876 to 1877. After Mississippi's readmission into the Union, Chalmers was elected a U.S. Representative for the state for three terms in 1877, 1878, and 1882 respectively. Although failing in three other bids for election, contested by John R. Lynch and Van H. Manning, Chalmers retired from politics and, in 1888, moved to Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he continued his law practice until his death on April 9, 1898. He was buried in Memphis, Tennessee, at Elmwood Cemetery, Evergreen Section, Lot 448.

 
J. R. CHALMERS, son of the Hon. Judge Joseph W. Chalmers (who was in the United States Senate under Polk’s administration), was born in Halifax County, Virginia, on the 11th of January, 1831. He is the oldest and only survivor of seven children—four sons and three daughters. In 1834 or 1835 he removed with his father to Jackson, Tennessee, and thence to Holly Springs, Marshall County, Mississippi, in 1839, where he was sent to school and prepared for college, which he entered at Columbia, South Carolina, in September, 1848, where he graduated in December, 1851, taking the second honor in a class of about fifteen. Returning to Holly Springs, he at once entered upon the study of law in the office of Barton & Chalmers, the firm being composed of his father and the great and gifted Roger Barton. In 1852 he was a delegate to the Democratic Convention which nominated Franklin Pierce for President. The next year he began to practice law at Holly Springs, and in 1857 he was elected District Attorney of the Seventh Judicial District, over several worthy and popular competitors. He was soon recognized as one of the ablest prosecuting attorneys in the State, and greatly increased and strengthened his popularity. He was a delegate from DeSoto County to the Mississippi State Convention, which passed the ordinance of secession, in January, 1861, and chairman of the military committee in that body.

The subject of this sketch was elected Colonel of the Ninth Mississippi Regiment of infantry, which was the first that entered the Confederate service from that State. His first engagement was a successful attack upon Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island, south of Pensacola, Florida.

Chalmers was appointed Brigadier-General on the 13th of February, 1862, and was in command of the forces that drove Sherman and his gunboats back from Eastport, Mississippi, on March 12th, and thus saved Bear Creek bridge from destruction, and the Memphis and Charleston Railroad from falling into the hands of the enemy. At the battle of Shiloh he commanded the extreme right brigade, and made the last charge on Sunday that was made by the Confederates on that eventful day. Balls passed through his clothing, and his horse was shot from under him on Monday. When the Confederate army fell back to Tupelo, Bragg assigned Chalmers to a cavalry command for a short time, but having been recalled to take charge of his infantry brigade, he went with Bragg on his Kentucky campaign. The former made an unsuccessful attack upon Mumfordsville, and was complimented by the latter for what he did. At the battle of Murfreesboro General Chalmers was severely wounded, and before he had fully recovered from the effect of his wound he was assigned by Bragg to the command of the cavalry in Northwest Mississippi, at the special request of the Governor of that State—Pettus.

General Chalmers now went to work in his new field and organized the “squads” and companies into regiments, which afterward, under his command, formed a prominent part in that terrible column that enabled Forrest to perform his wondrous feats and made his name immortal, causing him to go down the ages as the “Wizard of the Saddle.” General Chalmers commanded the first division of Forrest’s Cavalry from January, 1864, to the close of the war, as fully set forth in the preceding pages of this work, to which I refer the reader for the balance of the military career of this gallant and noble officer. He accepted the terms of surrender in good faith, and returned to his home in North Mississippi, where he again began the practice of his profession—the law.

In 1872 he was on the electoral ticket in Mississippi for Horace Greeley; in 1872 he was elected to the State Senate; in 1876 he was elected to Congress, from what is known as the “Shoe-string District,” and again in 1878, without opposition. In 1880 he was returned as elected, but was unseated in a contest by John R. Lynch, the Republican candidate. General Chalmers then removed from Vicksburg to Sardis, Mississippi, and in 1882 became an independent Democratic candidate for Congress against V. H. Manning, the regular Democratic nominee, and after a close, exciting canvass was elected, but by some sort of manipulation or legerdemain at Jackson by the Governor and Secretary of State, he was refused his certificate of election, though he was finally seated by a Democratic House, after a most exciting contest between Manning and himself. In 1884 and 1886 he was again a candidate against the Hon. J. B. Morgan, the regular Democratic nominee, and while there is but little doubt in the minds of his friends that he was elected both times, yet the certificate of election was given to his opponent.

As a speaker, General Chalmers is fluent, bold, pointed, and fearless. In his style he draws occasionally upon a cultivated and exuberant fancy, but indulges more frequently in pointed and racy anecdote. As a friend, he is sincere, true, and devoted; as an enemy, fearless and inflexible; but at all times just and generous, as ready to atone for a wrong, when he is convinced that he has committed one, as he is, upon the other hand, steadfast and immovable when satisfied that he is right.

I take the following from a letter recently received from Colonel C. R. Barteau:

“I meet General Chalmers frequently, and he inquires about your book. As I know him better, I love and appreciate the man. His talent is of a high order, his character spotless, and his moral courage beyond all question.”

The general is now (1887) engaged in the practice of law in the city of Memphis, Tennessee, in connection with his former comrade-in-arms and almost lifetime friend, Colonel Thomas W. Harris. They are recognized as among the leaders and most efficient of the Southern bar.

J. R. CHALMERS, son of the Hon. Judge Joseph W. Chalmers (who was in the United States Senate under Polk’s administration), was born in Halifax County, Virginia, on the 11th of January, 1831. He is the oldest and only survivor of seven children—four sons and three daughters. In 1834 or 1835 he removed with his father to Jackson, Tennessee, and thence to Holly Springs, Marshall County, Mississippi, in 1839, where he was sent to school and prepared for college, which he entered at Columbia, South Carolina, in September, 1848, where he graduated in December, 1851, taking the second honor in a class of about fifteen. Returning to Holly Springs, he at once entered upon the study of law in the office of Barton & Chalmers, the firm being composed of his father and the great and gifted Roger Barton. In 1852 he was a delegate to the Democratic Convention which nominated Franklin Pierce for President. The next year he began to practice law at Holly Springs, and in 1857 he was elected District Attorney of the Seventh Judicial District, over several worthy and popular competitors. He was soon recognized as one of the ablest prosecuting attorneys in the State, and greatly increased and strengthened his popularity. He was a delegate from DeSoto County to the Mississippi State Convention, which passed the ordinance of secession, in January, 1861, and chairman of the military committee in that body.

The subject of this sketch was elected Colonel of the Ninth Mississippi Regiment of infantry, which was the first that entered the Confederate service from that State. His first engagement was a successful attack upon Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island, south of Pensacola, Florida.

Chalmers was appointed Brigadier-General on the 13th of February, 1862, and was in command of the forces that drove Sherman and his gunboats back from Eastport, Mississippi, on March 12th, and thus saved Bear Creek bridge from destruction, and the Memphis and Charleston Railroad from falling into the hands of the enemy. At the battle of Shiloh he commanded the extreme right brigade, and made the last charge on Sunday that was made by the Confederates on that eventful day. Balls passed through his clothing, and his horse was shot from under him on Monday. When the Confederate army fell back to Tupelo, Bragg assigned Chalmers to a cavalry command for a short time, but having been recalled to take charge of his infantry brigade, he went with Bragg on his Kentucky campaign. The former made an unsuccessful attack upon Mumfordsville, and was complimented by the latter for what he did. At the battle of Murfreesboro General Chalmers was severely wounded, and before he had fully recovered from the effect of his wound he was assigned by Bragg to the command of the cavalry in Northwest Mississippi, at the special request of the Governor of that State—Pettus.

General Chalmers now went to work in his new field and organized the “squads” and companies into regiments, which afterward, under his command, formed a prominent part in that terrible column that enabled Forrest to perform his wondrous feats and made his name immortal, causing him to go down the ages as the “Wizard of the Saddle.” General Chalmers commanded the first division of Forrest’s Cavalry from January, 1864, to the close of the war, as fully set forth in the preceding pages of this work, to which I refer the reader for the balance of the military career of this gallant and noble officer. He accepted the terms of surrender in good faith, and returned to his home in North Mississippi, where he again began the practice of his profession—the law.

In 1872 he was on the electoral ticket in Mississippi for Horace Greeley; in 1872 he was elected to the State Senate; in 1876 he was elected to Congress, from what is known as the “Shoe-string District,” and again in 1878, without opposition. In 1880 he was returned as elected, but was unseated in a contest by John R. Lynch, the Republican candidate. General Chalmers then removed from Vicksburg to Sardis, Mississippi, and in 1882 became an independent Democratic candidate for Congress against V. H. Manning, the regular Democratic nominee, and after a close, exciting canvass was elected, but by some sort of manipulation or legerdemain at Jackson by the Governor and Secretary of State, he was refused his certificate of election, though he was finally seated by a Democratic House, after a most exciting contest between Manning and himself. In 1884 and 1886 he was again a candidate against the Hon. J. B. Morgan, the regular Democratic nominee, and while there is but little doubt in the minds of his friends that he was elected both times, yet the certificate of election was given to his opponent.

As a speaker, General Chalmers is fluent, bold, pointed, and fearless. In his style he draws occasionally upon a cultivated and exuberant fancy, but indulges more frequently in pointed and racy anecdote. As a friend, he is sincere, true, and devoted; as an enemy, fearless and inflexible; but at all times just and generous, as ready to atone for a wrong, when he is convinced that he has committed one, as he is, upon the other hand, steadfast and immovable when satisfied that he is right.

I take the following from a letter recently received from Colonel C. R. Barteau:

“I meet General Chalmers frequently, and he inquires about your book. As I know him better, I love and appreciate the man. His talent is of a high order, his character spotless, and his moral courage beyond all question.”

The general is now (1887) engaged in the practice of law in the city of Memphis, Tennessee, in connection with his former comrade-in-arms and almost lifetime friend, Colonel Thomas W. Harris. They are recognized as among the leaders and most efficient of the Southern bar.

J. R. CHALMERS, son of the Hon. Judge Joseph W. Chalmers (who was in the United States Senate under Polk’s administration), was born in Halifax County, Virginia, on the 11th of January, 1831. He is the oldest and only survivor of seven children—four sons and three daughters. In 1834 or 1835 he removed with his father to Jackson, Tennessee, and thence to Holly Springs, Marshall County, Mississippi, in 1839, where he was sent to school and prepared for college, which he entered at Columbia, South Carolina, in September, 1848, where he graduated in December, 1851, taking the second honor in a class of about fifteen. Returning to Holly Springs, he at once entered upon the study of law in the office of Barton & Chalmers, the firm being composed of his father and the great and gifted Roger Barton. In 1852 he was a delegate to the Democratic Convention which nominated Franklin Pierce for President. The next year he began to practice law at Holly Springs, and in 1857 he was elected District Attorney of the Seventh Judicial District, over several worthy and popular competitors. He was soon recognized as one of the ablest prosecuting attorneys in the State, and greatly increased and strengthened his popularity. He was a delegate from DeSoto County to the Mississippi State Convention, which passed the ordinance of secession, in January, 1861, and chairman of the military committee in that body.

The subject of this sketch was elected Colonel of the Ninth Mississippi Regiment of infantry, which was the first that entered the Confederate service from that State. His first engagement was a successful attack upon Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island, south of Pensacola, Florida.

Chalmers was appointed Brigadier-General on the 13th of February, 1862, and was in command of the forces that drove Sherman and his gunboats back from Eastport, Mississippi, on March 12th, and thus saved Bear Creek bridge from destruction, and the Memphis and Charleston Railroad from falling into the hands of the enemy. At the battle of Shiloh he commanded the extreme right brigade, and made the last charge on Sunday that was made by the Confederates on that eventful day. Balls passed through his clothing, and his horse was shot from under him on Monday. When the Confederate army fell back to Tupelo, Bragg assigned Chalmers to a cavalry command for a short time, but having been recalled to take charge of his infantry brigade, he went with Bragg on his Kentucky campaign. The former made an unsuccessful attack upon Mumfordsville, and was complimented by the latter for what he did. At the battle of Murfreesboro General Chalmers was severely wounded, and before he had fully recovered from the effect of his wound he was assigned by Bragg to the command of the cavalry in Northwest Mississippi, at the special request of the Governor of that State—Pettus.

General Chalmers now went to work in his new field and organized the “squads” and companies into regiments, which afterward, under his command, formed a prominent part in that terrible column that enabled Forrest to perform his wondrous feats and made his name immortal, causing him to go down the ages as the “Wizard of the Saddle.” General Chalmers commanded the first division of Forrest’s Cavalry from January, 1864, to the close of the war, as fully set forth in the preceding pages of this work, to which I refer the reader for the balance of the military career of this gallant and noble officer. He accepted the terms of surrender in good faith, and returned to his home in North Mississippi, where he again began the practice of his profession—the law.

In 1872 he was on the electoral ticket in Mississippi for Horace Greeley; in 1872 he was elected to the State Senate; in 1876 he was elected to Congress, from what is known as the “Shoe-string District,” and again in 1878, without opposition. In 1880 he was returned as elected, but was unseated in a contest by John R. Lynch, the Republican candidate. General Chalmers then removed from Vicksburg to Sardis, Mississippi, and in 1882 became an independent Democratic candidate for Congress against V. H. Manning, the regular Democratic nominee, and after a close, exciting canvass was elected, but by some sort of manipulation or legerdemain at Jackson by the Governor and Secretary of State, he was refused his certificate of election, though he was finally seated by a Democratic House, after a most exciting contest between Manning and himself. In 1884 and 1886 he was again a candidate against the Hon. J. B. Morgan, the regular Democratic nominee, and while there is but little doubt in the minds of his friends that he was elected both times, yet the certificate of election was given to his opponent.

As a speaker, General Chalmers is fluent, bold, pointed, and fearless. In his style he draws occasionally upon a cultivated and exuberant fancy, but indulges more frequently in pointed and racy anecdote. As a friend, he is sincere, true, and devoted; as an enemy, fearless and inflexible; but at all times just and generous, as ready to atone for a wrong, when he is convinced that he has committed one, as he is, upon the other hand, steadfast and immovable when satisfied that he is right.

I take the following from a letter recently received from Colonel C. R. Barteau:

“I meet General Chalmers frequently, and he inquires about your book. As I know him better, I love and appreciate the man. His talent is of a high order, his character spotless, and his moral courage beyond all question.”

The general is now (1887) engaged in the practice of law in the city of Memphis, Tennessee, in connection with his former comrade-in-arms and almost lifetime friend, Colonel Thomas W. Harris. They are recognized as among the leaders and most efficient of the Southern bar.


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $295.00 USD

Confederate Soldier with Black Cloth over Buttons CDV

A nice image of a Confederate soldier after the war.  He is wearing black cloth over his military buttons.  While we all know this was fairly common, we don't find many photographs of this.  The backmark is "Guay & Co., No. 75, Camp Street, New Orleans".  The image is trimmed and rounded at the top of the carte to fit in a photograph book. 

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $250.00 USD

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