Grand Army of the Republic
Ohio GAR Badges
McMillen Post No. 122, South Charleston, Ohio Pin Back

A nice pin back worn by Union veterans who were members of the McMillen Post No. 122 of South Charleston, Ohio.  The pin back has a woman holding a U.S.flag putting a wreath on a G.A.R. monument.  Written around the graphics is "McMillen Post No. 122, Ohio".  The badge was made by the Sommer Badge Manufacturing Company of Newark, New Jersey as noted in the back of the pin back.  The pin is approximately 1 1/4 inches wide.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $35.00 USD

Johnny Clem, the Drummer Boy of Chickamauga, 1933 Pin Back

A neat pin back from the 1933 Grand Army of the Republic Department of Ohio 67th Annual Encampment held in Newark, Ohio.  The pin back has Major General John L. Clem's likeness in the middle of the pin back.  Written around the likeness is "67th Annual Encampment - Dept. Ohio G.A.R. - Maj. Gen. John L. Clem - Newark, Ohio  June 18 - 22, 1933".  The pin back is approximately 1 1/2 inches wide.  The pin back was made by the Lilley Company, Columbus, Ohio as noted in the back of the pin back.

John Clem
Drummer Boy of Chickamauga
Civil War
/
Union
DATE OF BIRTH - DEATH
August 13, 1851 – May 13, 1937

When President Abraham Lincoln in May 1861 issued the call for volunteers to serve in the Union army for a three year term, one of those who tried to answer was Ohio resident John Clem. Not yet 10 years old, Clem’s service was refused by the newly formed 3rd Ohio. Undeterred, Clem later tried to join the 22nd Michigan, where his persistence won over the unit’s officers. They agreed to let him follow the regiment, adopting him as a mascot and unofficial drummer boy. The officers also chipped in to pay his monthly salary of $13 before he finally was allowed to officially enlist in 1863.

Clem became a national celebrity for his actions at Chickamauga. Armed with a musket sawed down for him to carry, Clem joined the 22nd Michigan in the defense of Horseshoe Ridge on the afternoon of September 20. As the Confederate forces surrounded the unit, a Confederate colonel spotted Clem and shouted either “I think the best thing a mite of a chap like you can do is drop that gun” or called him a “damned little Yankee devil,” according to various sources. Rather than surrender, Clem shot the colonel and successfully made his way back to Union lines. For his actions, Clem was promoted to sergeant, the youngest soldier ever to become a noncommissioned officer in the U.S. Army, and became known as the “Drummer Boy of Chickamauga.”

Clem’s legend grew following the battle, although some stories may be apocryphal. One holds that his drum was destroyed at the Battle of Shiloh, earning him the nickname “Johnny Shiloh” and serving as inspiration for the song, “The Drummer Boy of Shiloh.” However, the 22nd Michigan, Clem’s unit, was not mustered until the summer after the Battle of Shiloh, making it unlikely Clem saw action in the battle with that regiment.

Clem went on to fight at Perryville, Murfreesboro, Kennesaw and Atlanta, where he was wounded twice. Clem was discharged from the Army in 1864 at age 13, but sought to rejoin the military in 1870. Nominated to West Point by President Ulysses S. Grant, Clem failed the entrance exam several times before Grant appointed him a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. Clem enjoyed a successful second military career, rising to the rank of colonel and assistant quartermaster general by 1906. He retired on the eve of U.S. entry into World War I with the rank of major general, the last Civil War veteran to actively serve in the U.S. Army. Clem died in 1937 and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $45.00 USD

Captain Henry M. Neil, Ohio Light Artillery Pin Back

A pin back worn at the 1934 Grand Army of the republic, Department of Ohio Annual Encampment held in Columbus, Ohio.  The imagein the middle of the pin back is Captain henry M. Neil.  Captain Neil enlisted in January, 1862 in the 11th Ohio Light Artillery.  On April 28. 1863 he was transferred to the 22nd Ohio Light Artillery.  The pin back is approximately 1 1/2 inches wide.  Written around Captain Neil's image on the pin back is "68th Annual Encampment - Dept. of Ohio G.A.R. - Capt. Henry M. Neil - Columbus, Ohio June 17 - 21, 1934".

11th Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery

Online Books
11th Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery Soldier Roster - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 10, by Ohio Roster Commission (Joseph B. Foraker, Governor, James S. Robinson, Sec'y of State and H. A. Axline, Adjutant-General), 1886     View Entire Book

Regimental History
Eleventh Independent Battery Light Artillery. — Capts., Archibald G. A. Constable, Frank C. Sands, Fletcher E. Armstrong; First Lieuts., Henry M. Neil, Cyrus Sears, William M. Wynne; Second Lieuts., William D. Linn, David A. Southworth, William K. Perrine, Amos B. Alger, William Bush, Milon D. Whaley, John A. McArthy. This battery was mustered into service Oct. 27, 1861, at St. Louis arsenal, Mo., by Lieut. George B. Sanford, 1st U. S. cavalry, to serve for three years, aggregating 151 men, rank and file. Its first actual service was with the New Madrid expedition, from which it brought in 2 Confederate 6-pounder guns as trophies of its success, and then it remained in camp until April 12, improving the time by drilling in field maneuvers. During the siege, and in the battles and skirmishes resulting in the evacuation of Corinth, the battery bore its full share. In September it went into action at Iuka, 102 strong, and during the engagement was charged three different times, suffering a loss of 2 officers and 55 men killed or wounded, 18 being killed on the field and others dying afterward. Not a man flinched and numbers were killed or wounded after the Confederates had passed the muzzles of the guns, some of them nobly dying in the attempt to spike their pieces. But, severely as the battery suffered in this engagement in the loss of men and equipments, it was in a short time again ready for the field and took a prominent part in the battle of Corinth, nobly maintaining its reputation for efficiency and gallantry and suffering a loss of 5 men wounded during the action. During the siege of Vicksburg it was held in reserve and participated in several expeditions to the rear, fighting as occasion required. On the day of the capitulation it was camped at Snyder's bluff on the Yazoo river. The battery was mustered out on Nov. 5, 1864.

 22nd Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery

Online Books
22nd Ohio Independent Battery Light Artillery Soldier Roster - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 10, by Ohio Roster Commission (Joseph B. Foraker, Governor, James S. Robinson, Sec'y of State and H. A. Axline, Adjutant-General), 1886     View Entire Book

Regimental History
Twenty-second Independent Battery Light Artillery. — Capts., Henry M. Neil, Amos B. Alger; First Lieuts., George W. Taylor, Peter Cornell, Harvey Burdell, Silas H. Towler; Second Lieuts., Jacob M. Sharp, William West. A section of this battery was organized April 1, 1863, and placed on duty at Wheeling, W. Va., and in Holmes county, Ohio. This section was brought back to Camp Chase on June 19, 1863, the organization completed, and mustered into service on July 14, 1863, by Capt. J. L. Proctor of the 18th U. S. infantry, to serve for three years. The battery was sent to Parkersburg, W. Va., and thence to Wheeling. From Wheeling it moved to Hancock, Md., in support of Gen. Kelley, and then returned to Parkersburg, sending out detachments in pursuit of Gen. Morgan, then on his raid through Indiana and Ohio. After the capture of Morgan the battery returned to Camp Chase. On Aug. 12, 1863, it marched to Camp Nelson, Ky., and on Sept. 1 marched toward Cumberland gap. It arrived in front of the gap on Sept. 7, and took part in the operations which compelled its surrender. On Jan. 3, 1864, a detachment under command of Lieut. A. B. Alger, in company with a force of 350 cavalry, while on a reconnoissance at Jonesville, Va., was compelled to surrender after 12 hours' fighting, for want of ammunition. On Feb. 14, 1864, Lieut. George W. Taylor was murdered by a Confederate citizen, near Barboursville, Ky., and on June 21, 1864, Peter Cornell was killed by Confederate guerrillas, near Cumberland gap. On June 27, 1864, the battery was ordered to Knoxville, Tenn., and on July 5, 1865, it was ordered to Camp Chase, Ohio, where it was mustered out on the 13th, in accordance with orders from the war department. 

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $40.00 USD

105 Ohio Infantry Captain M.W. Wright Pin Back

A nice pin back with the likeness of Captain Marshall W. Wright of the 105th Ohio Infantry.  Written around the likeness of Captain Wright is "Capt. M.W. Wright, Q.M. 105th O.V.I.".  The pin back is approximately 1 1/4 inches wide.  It was made by the Ehrman Manufacturing Company of Boston, Massachusetts as noted on the back of the pin back.  

105th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

From Dyer's Compendium

105th Regiment Infantry. Organized at Cleveland, Ohio, and mustered in August 20, 1862. Ordered to Covington, Ky., August 21, 1862; thence to Lexington, Ky., August 25. March to relief of Nelson August 30. Retreat to Louisville, Ky., September 1-15. Attached to 33rd Brigade, 10th Division, Army of the Ohio, to September, 1862. 33rd Brigade, 10th Division, 2nd Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 5th Division (Centre), 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 14th Army Corps, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to July, 1865.
SERVICE.--Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-12. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. March to Munfordsville, Ky., October 12, and duty there till November 30. Expedition to Cave City October 31 and November 26. Moved to Bledsoe Creek November 30. Operations against Morgan December 22, 1862, to January 2, 1863. March to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Murfreesboro January 3-11, and duty there till June. Expedition to Auburn, Liberty and Alexandria February 3-5. Expedition to Woodbury March 3-8. Vaught's Hill, near Milton, March 20. Expedition to McMinnville April 20-30. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Shellmound August 21. Reconnoissance toward Chattanooga August 30-31. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Orchard Knob November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Demonstrations on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27, 1864. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Face Ridge February 23-25. Reconnoissance from Ringgold toward Tunnel Hill April 29. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstrations on Rocky Face Ridge May 8-11. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Utoy Creek August 5-7. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Operations against; Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-15. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Fayetteville, N. C., March 11. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out June 3, 1865. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 104 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 7 Officers and 126 Enlisted men by disease. Total 240.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $40.00 USD

9 Ohio Infantry 50th Anniversary 1911 Post Card

A great post card of the survivors of the 9th Ohio Volunteer Infantry in 1911 at their 50th Anniversary.  This image has a group of the 9th OVI veterans sitting behind a cannon.  All the veterans are listed below the photograph.  A neat post card from the reunion.

9th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Organized in Cincinnati under Col. Robert M. McCook. The members of the regiment were primarily of German descent. The 9th was mustered into three months service April 22nd, 1861 and reorganized into three years service May 28th 1861. It served in West Virginia under McClellan and transferred to the Army of the Potomac, July 27th, and to the Army of the Ohio, in December. The 9th did valuable service in Tennessee, and participated in the battle of Chickamauga, with heavy loss. It took part in the battle of Mission Ridge and was at the battle of Resaca during Sherman's Atlanta campaign. The Regiment's service having expired, it returned to Camp Dennison and was mustered out, June 7th, 1864.

From Dyer's Compendium

9th Regiment Infantry (3 Months). Organized at Camp Harrison near Cincinnati, Ohio, April 22, 1861. Moved to Camp Dennison, Ohio, and duty there till May 27. Reorganized at Camp Dennison for three years May 27 to June 13, 1861, the first three-years Regiment from the State. Three months' men mustered out August 4, 1861.

9th Regiment Infantry (3 Years). Organized at Camp Dennison, Ohio, May 27 to June 13, 1861. Ordered to West Virginia June 16. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Army of Occupation, W. Va., to August, 1861. 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division West Virginia, to November, 1861. 3rd Brigade, Army Ohio, to December, 1861. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Army Ohio, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps, Army Ohio, to November, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, Center 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to May, 1864.
SERVICE.--West Virginia Campaign July 6-17, 1861. Battle of Rich Mountain July 10. Capture of Beverly July 12. Duty at New Creek till August 27. At New River till November 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., November 24-December 2, thence to Lebanon, Ky., and duty there till January, 1862. Advance to Camp Hamilton January 1-17. Battle of Mill Springs January 19-20. March to Louisville, Ky., thence moved to Nashville, Tenn, via Ohio and Cumberland Rivers February 10-March 2. March to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 20-April 7. (Presented by ladies of Louisville with a National flag for gallantry at Mill Springs.) Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Ordered to Tuscumbia, Ala., June 22, and duty there till July 27. Moved to Decherd, Tenn., July 27, thence march to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-September 26. Pursuit of Hood into Kentucky October 1-15. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. March to Nashville, Tenn., via Bowling Green, Lancaster, Danville and Lebanon October 16-November 7. Duty at South Tunnel opening communications with Nashville November 8 26. Guard fords of the Cumberland till January 14. 1863. Duty at Nashville, Tenn., January 15-March 6. Expedition toward Columbia March 6-14. Moved to Triune and duty there till June. Franklin June 4-5. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 27. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-21. Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Brown's Ferry October 27, Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Battles of Orchard Knob November 23. Mission Ridge November 24-25. Demonstration on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27, 1864. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Face Ridge February 23-25. Reconnoissance from Ringgold toward Tunnel Hill April 29. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-25. Demonstration on Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Left front May 25. Mustered out at Camp Dennison, Ohio, June 7, 1864, expiration of term. Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 85 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 60 Enlisted men by disease. Total 153.


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $60.00 USD

94 Ohio Volunteer Infantry Identified Shield/Ladder Badge

Offered is a super badge worn by John W. Ganger of Company K, 94th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  The hanger has “Co. K” written on it.  The drop which is attached to the hanger is in the shape of an acorn or 14th Corps symbol.  Written on the drop is “94” OHIO VOL. INF. – War 1861-5 – John W. Ganger”. 

 John W. Ganger

Residence was not listed; 19 years old.

 

Enlisted on 8/11/1862 as a Private.

 

On 8/24/1862 he mustered into "K" Co. OH 94th Infantry

He was Mustered Out on 6/5/1865 at Washington, DC

 

 

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

From Dyer's Compendium

94th Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Piqua, Ohio, and mustered in August 22, 1862. Ordered to Lexington, Ky., August 28. Expedition to Yates' Ford, Kentucky River, August 30-September 3. Yates' Ford August 31. Tait's Ferry, Kentucky River, September 1. Retreat to Louisville, Ky., September 2-3. Attached to 9th Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of the Ohio, September, 1862. 9th Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Center 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 14th Army Corps, to June, 1865.
SERVICE.--Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15, 1862. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 16-November 7, and duty there till December 26. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Duty at Murfreesboro till June, Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River, and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Davis Cross Roads or Dug Gap September 11. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Rossville Gap September 21. Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Lookout Mountain November 24-25. Mission Ridge November 25. Pea Vine Valley and Graysville November 26. Ringgold Gap, Taylor's Ridge, November 27. Demonstrations on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27, 1864. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Face Ridge February 23-25. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Rocky Face Ridge May Buzzard's Roost Gap May 8-9. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Pickett's Mills May 27. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River May 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Utoy Creek August 5-7. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Near Red Oak August 29. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Near Rocky Mount, S.C., February 28. Taylor's Hole Creek, Averysboro, N. C., March 16. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out June 6, 1865. Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 52 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 144 Enlisted men by disease. Total 199.


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $435.00 USD

58 Ohio Volunteer Infantry Identified Shield/Ladder Badge

Offered is a neat identified badge worn by M. Zeller of Company F, 58th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  The badge has two ladders and one shield for the bottom drop.  Written on the two ladders is “CO- F – 58 OHIO”.  Written on the attached shield is “VOL. INF. – War 1861-65 – M. Zeller”.  There are also crossed muskets and a 17th Corps arrow symbol. 

Martin Zellers

Residence was not listed; 19 years old.

 

Enlisted on 12/6/1861 as a Private.

 

On 1/9/1862 he mustered into "F" Co. OH 58th Infantry

He was Mustered Out on 1/14/1865 at Vicksburg, MS

 

 

He was listed as:

* Wounded 4/29/1863 Grand Gulf, MS

 

 

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

58th Ohio Regiment Infantry

Regimental History

Fifty-eighth Infantry. — Col., Valentine Bausenwein ; Lieut.-Cols., Ferdinand F. Remple, Peter Dister, Ezra P. Jackson, William S. Friesner; Maj., Andrew Gallfy. This regiment was organized at Camp Chase, from Oct. 1, 1861, to Jan. 28, 1862, to serve for three years. It remained at Camp Chase, perfecting itself in the "school of the soldier," until in Feb., 1862, when it was transported by rail to Cincinnati, and there embarked on steamers for Fort Donelson, Tenn., where it arrived on Feb. 13. Preparations were at once made to take part in the assault on the fort and after moving a short distance a furious attack was made by the enemy, but the shock was met with coolness, ending in the Confederates being hurled back into their intrenchments. Early on the morning of the 16th the regiment was marched to the center of the line, where it remained until the announcement of the surrender of the fort. It went into the battle of Shiloh on the morning of the second day's fighting and was under fire until 4 p. m., its loss being 9 killed and 43 wounded. Then came the tedious, exhausting march on Corinth, creeping with snail-like pace toward that miserable town, and after the evacuation the regiment with the rest of the army took possession. In a reconnoissance down the Mississippi on transports a Confederate steamer with 5,000 stands of arms and 2 pieces of artillery, was captured near Milliken's bend, La. In the affair at Chickasaw bluffs the regiment lost 47 per cent, of the whole number engaged. It remained in this vicinity until in January, when it reembarked on transports and sailed down the Yazoo river to its mouth; thence up the Mississippi and White rivers to Arkansas Post, where it took a prominent part in the capture of that place. In March an expedition was ordered up the Yazoo river to Deer creek, resulting in a three days' fight, in which the regiment lost a few men. In the battle of Grand Gulf the regiment lost heavily. It then joined the land forces at Vicksburg, where it remained until ordered home to be mustered out, which was consummated on Jan. 14, 1865.


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $455.00 USD

46 Ohio Volunteer Infantry Identified Shield/ Ladder badge

Offered is a great badge worn by Albert McIntire of Company C, 46th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  The hanger has the name of the soldier on it “Albert McIntire”.  The shield has “Co. C – 46” Ohio Vol. Inf” written on it.  The United States flag is on the bottom of the shield.   

 46th Ohio Regiment Infantry

Online Books
46th Ohio Infantry Soldier Roster - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 4, by Ohio Roster Commission (Joseph B. Foraker, Governor, James S. Robinson, Sec'y of State and H. A. Axline, Adjutant-General), 1886     View Entire Book

Regimental History
Forty-sixth Infantry.— Cols., Thomas Worthington, Charles C. Walcutt; Lieut.-Cols., William Smith, Isaac N. Alexander, Edward N. Upton; Majs., Henry H. Giesy, John B. Neil. This regiment was organized at Worthington, from Oct. 23, 1861, to Jan. 28, 1862, to serve for three years. It was sent to the field from Camp Chase in Feb., 1862, with an aggregate of 975 men, and reported at Paducah, Ky. It was engaged during the entire battle of Shiloh, with a loss of 280 killed and wounded, and 15 captured. It remained upon that field until April 27, when it moved with the army upon Corinth. Early in June, 1863, it was transported to Vicksburg and participated in the siege of that place. In the campaign against Jackson, Miss., the regiment suffered greatly from heat and the scarcity of water. At the battle of Missionary ridge it was engaged severely and sustained a heavy loss in killed and wounded. Immediately after this battle the regiment moved on the Knoxville campaign, and having raised the siege of that place marched to Scottsboro, Ala., for winter quarters. There it veteranized and after its furlough home returned to camp. On May 1, 1864, it moved in the direction of Chattanooga and thence by way of Snake Creek gap to Resaca, where it was actively engaged for three days, but with slight loss. In two engagements at Dallas the Spencer rifles of the regiment caused such havoc in the charging columns, that ever after the 46th was known and dreaded throughout the opposing army. In the assault at Kennesaw mountain the regiment captured 60 prisoners, but its own loss in killed and wounded was severe. The regiment was engaged in skirmishing about Atlanta until July 22, when it assisted in repelling an attack on the 17th corps. From this time it was constantly engaged in skirmishing and participated in Sherman's flank movement to Jonesboro. On Sept. 2, it was again engaged and succeeded in capturing the enemy's fortified skirmish line. It shared in the final movements of Sherman's army, and was mustered out on July 22, 1865. During its term of service it lost 20 men captured and 705 men killed, wounded and died of disease.

Footnotes:

Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 2  


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $395.00 USD

1919 G.A.R. Department of Ohio, Lima, Ohio Badge

A nice badge worn by an Ohio veteran at the 1919 Grand Army of the Republic Department of Ohio reunion held in Lima, Ohio.  The hanger is heavy metal and has the likeness of President Abraham Lincoln on it.  Written around President Lincoln is "Representative G.A.R. - 53rd Annual Encampment - Lima, Ohio - June 16 - 20, 1919".  The drop is in the shape of a star with "G.A.R." entwined in a circle in the middle.  An anchor, crossed sabers, crossed rifles, crossed cannon tubes, and an infantry horn are surrounding the circle.  The badge was made by the S.G. Childs Co. Engravers, Chicago as noted on the back of the drop

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $45.00 USD

Washington County, Ohio Veterans Association Members badge

A neat badge worn by Union veterans who were members of the Washington County, Ohio, Veterans Association.  The hanger is of a brass type metal with "Member" lodged in the middle.  A red, white, and blue ribbon is attached.  Attached to the ribbon is a celluloid disk with the likeness of President Abraham Lincoln.  Written around Lincoln's likeness is "Washington County, Ohio, Veterans Association - 1861 - 1865".  

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $85.00 USD

1889 Dept. of Ohio Reunion Badge held in Dayton, Ohio

Another great badge worn by Ohio veterans at their Grand Army of the Republic Ohio Department encampment held in 1889 at Dayton, Ohio.  The hanger is a simple metal bar with "Dayton, Ohio" written on it.  A red ribbon is attached to the hanger.  On the ribbon is "Delegate" in gold ink.  Attached to the ribbon is a drop.  In the center of the drop is the likeness of Daniel C. Putnam, the Department Commander.  His likeness is surrounded by laurel leaves and a knap sack is over his head.  On the knap sack "GAR".  Written on the drop is "1887 - 1888 - Department Commander - Daniel C. Putnam".  On the back of the drop is written "23rd Annual Encampment G.A.R. Dept. of Ohio - April 24.25.26. 1889.  Dayton, Ohio".

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $65.00 USD

1927 GAR Canton, Ohio State Reunion Badge

A nice badge worn by an Ohio veteran at the 1927 Grand Army of the Republic Ohio department encampment held in Canton, Ohio.  This nice three piece badge has a metal hanger with "G.A.R." in the slot and covered by a clear plastic piece.  A red, white, and blue ribbon is attached to the hanger.  Written in silver ink on the ribbon is "61st Annual Encampment - G.A.R. of Ohio - Canton - June 12 - 16, 1927".  A metal drop is attached to the ribbon.  On the drop is the likeness of the McKinley Monument.  Written around the likeness is "McKinley Monument - Canton, Ohio".  The badge is made by the Bastion Brothers Badge Company, Rochester, NY as noted on the back of the drop.  

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $45.00 USD

1905 GAR Ohio State Encampment Badge - Washington Court House, Ohio

A beautiful badge worn by Ohio veterans at the 1905 Grand Army of the Republic Department of Ohio encampment held at Washington Court House, Ohio.  The hanger of this badge has a court house with the scales of justice surrounding a likeness of George Washington.  Written on the  hanger is "Washington Court House - Souvenir".  A really neat cavalry type hat is hanging from the hanger.  Also attached to the hanger is a red, white, and blue ribbon.  Attached to the ribbon is a drop with the Ohio state seal in the middle of the drop.  Surrounding the drop is written "39th Annual Encampment G.A.R. - 1905".  Surrounding the writing is a cannon, drum, cavalry horse, and several stacked muskets.  Written on the back of the drop is "39th Annual Encampment Department of Ohio - G.A.R. - Washington C.H. Ohio, June 6-7-8-9. 1905.".

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $75.00 USD

1924 GAR Ohio State Encampment Badge - Warren, Ohio

A very clean and nice badge worn by veterans at the 1924 Grand Army of the Republic Department of Ohio Encampment held at Warren, Ohio.  This great badge has a large hanger with a GAR membership badge on it with "Representative - GAR - Dep't of Ohio - 58th Ann'l Enc'pt - Warren, 1924" written on it.  The attached drop has the likeness of General Simon Perkins in the middle of the drop.  Written around the likeness is "General Simon Perkins".  A red ribbon is attached to the hanger and is in good condition.  

Simon Perkins

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General Simon Perkins (September 17, 1771 - November 6, 1844) was an early settler, businessman and surveyor of the Western Reserve of Connecticut, which would later become northeast Ohio. He co-founded Akron, Ohio with Paul Williams in 1825. He served as a brigadier-general during the War of 1812.

Biography[edit]

Engraving of General Simon Perkins from Fifty Years and Over of Akron and Summit County by Samuel A. Lane from the original oil portrait by Jarvis.

Simon Perkins was born on September 17, 1771, in Norwich, Connecticut. He was of mostly English descent though he also had small amounts of Scottish ancestry from his mother. He was the oldest son of Capt. Simon Perkins and Olive Douglas. His father died at age 41 in 1778 while serving in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. Simon was descended from one of the oldest English Puritan families of New England, and his ancestry went back to John Perkins who came to the new world with Roger Williams in 1631. His mother was a descendant of William Douglas, one of the founders of New London, Connecticut.[1] At a young age, Perkins learned how to survey and in 1795 he went to Oswego, New York where he surveyed and worked in land sales for three years. In late 1797, he was employed by the Erie Land Company to become the company's land agent in Ohio. The Erie Land Company was organized by General Moses Cleaveland and other members of the Connecticut Land Company. He surveyed the company's land holdings in 1798 and established his headquarters in Warren, Ohio, where he lived the rest of his life. He remained an agent of the Erie Land Company until 1831.

In 1801, he was appointed the first postmaster in the Connecticut Western Reserve, remaining in the position until 1829. In 1807, he established a mail route to Detroit by negotiating a treaty with Native American tribes after urging from Postmaster General Gideon Granger.

In 1808, Perkins became a brigadier-general in the Ohio militia. In the War of 1812, he defended the northwestern portion of Ohio from Native American and British attack after General William Hull's surrender of Detroit in the fall of 1812. He commanded approximately 400 men.

General Perkins established the Western Reserve Bank of Warren on November 24, 1813. This bank had 64 stockholders and a capital of about $100,000. He also assisted in founding other banks in Painesville and Norwalk. Additionally, Perkins co-founded the Brier Hill Iron & Coal Company, later the Brier Hill Steel Company in Youngstown, Ohio. He served as a trustee of Warren Academy, agent for Aetna Life Insurance Company, and stockholder and president of the Trumbull and Ashtabula Turnpike Company. Most importantly he served as state canal commissioner from 1826 to 1838, being one of the main planners for the route of the Ohio and Erie Canal. He also served as auditor of Trumbull County, Ohio from 1810-1812.

Perkins was one of the largest land owners in the state. Portage County, Ohio records of 1815 show that he paid one-eleventh of all state real estate taxes from the county. Some of the townships listed are now in present-day Summit County, Ohio. Most of these holdings were acquired through outright purchases. Some of his holdings were in what is now Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio and western Akron, Ohio. On March 25, 1815, he purchased 1,298 acres from Samuel Parkman for $2.08 an acre. This tract would become most of downtown Akron. When he learned of plans for a canal system that would run from Cleveland to the Ohio River, he immediately began to make more purchases of more land in this area. Some of this land was located near Summit Lake, located in what is now south Akron. He hoped that the new canal would be routed through this lake, increasing the value of the land. In 1825, he was successful in convincing the other canal commissioners of this route and therefore donated land to the state for the canal right-of-way. Also in 1825, he and Paul Williams (a settler from Connecticut) donated 100 lots of land to the state, thus founding the City of Akron. It was recorded on December 6, 1825 at the Portage County seat of Ravenna. Due to its location at the highest point on the new canal, Akron quickly became a prosperous town. However, Gen. Perkins never lived in Akron. His oldest son, Colonel Simon Perkins, moved to the Akron area in 1834 to oversee his father's holdings in the area. His large house, the Perkins Stone Mansion, was completed in 1837 and remains to this day, now operated as a house museum by The Summit County Historical Society of Akron, Ohio. Col. Perkins also operated a large sheep farm and wool business, among other concerns, which for a time was managed by the abolitionist John Brown.

General Perkins married Nancy Ann Bishop on March 1, 1804. They had nine children, Simon, Anna Maria, Olive Douglas, Alfred, Martha, Charles, Joseph, Jacob and Henry Bishop. Joseph became president of the Bank of Commerce in Cleveland and president and co-founder of Lake View Cemetery. He was also known for leading reform movements in Ohio jails and infirmaries. Jacob became manager and builder for the Cleveland & Mahoning Railroad.

General Simon Perkins died November 6, 1844 in Warren. His wife died April 24, 1862. Original oil portraits of General and Mrs. Simon Perkins are on view at the Perkins Stone Mansion,.


Shipping Weight: 1 lb
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1911 GAR Ohio State Badge - Admiral Farragut on drop

A very nice badge from the 1911 Grand Army of the Republic Ohio State encampment held at Lorain, Ohio.  This great badge has an eagle holding a saber in it's claws, sitting on a pair of crossed cannons and cannon balls, and the word "DELEGATE" on the hanger.  A beautiful US flag ribbon is attached.  The drop has a likeness of Admiral Farragut in the middle of the drop.  Written around the likeness of Admiral Farragut is "Presented by Admiral Farragut Post No. 2 - Lorain, Ohio - Admiral Farragut".  A likeness of the outer harbor at Lorain is in the center of the back of the drop.  Written around the likeness is "45th Annual Encampment G.A.R. Lorain Ohio - June 19 - 26 - 1911 - The Outer Harbor, Lorain, Ohio".  The badge is approximately 6 inches by 1 7/8 inches.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $85.00 USD

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